From: Bill on
> I don't have access to the outside of the AC - I think I can't open it
> from the inside.
> If I spray with Lysol, should I spray the intake or just the blow out
> area?
>

Spray in the intake. Also remove the filter and you will see "coils". Pour a
bit of bleach on the coils so it drips down to the bottom. This is where the
standing water will be and that is the source of the smell. The bleach will
kill the bacteria. Do this when you will be gone for awhile and open your
windows - run the A/C to get rid of the bleach smell.

Newer window A/C units are designed to have standing water in them. The rear
fan blade splashes the water on the rear coils and this makes it run more
efficiently. But the standing water can stink!

I carefully drilled holes in the bottom of mine (outside) so all the water
would drain out. End of problem...



From: GregS on
In article <8cim3oF820U1(a)mid.individual.net>, "Bill" <billnomailnospamx(a)yahoo.com> wrote:
>> I don't have access to the outside of the AC - I think I can't open it
>> from the inside.
>> If I spray with Lysol, should I spray the intake or just the blow out
>> area?
>>
>
>Spray in the intake. Also remove the filter and you will see "coils". Pour a
>bit of bleach on the coils so it drips down to the bottom. This is where the
>standing water will be and that is the source of the smell. The bleach will
>kill the bacteria. Do this when you will be gone for awhile and open your
>windows - run the A/C to get rid of the bleach smell.
>
>Newer window A/C units are designed to have standing water in them. The rear
>fan blade splashes the water on the rear coils and this makes it run more
>efficiently. But the standing water can stink!
>
>I carefully drilled holes in the bottom of mine (outside) so all the water
>would drain out. End of problem...


Window units have had standing water for cooling misting for as
long as I can remember, about1960. Most start leaking after
they rust out, decreasing efficiency. There are probably some that
just drain. They are suppose to get rid of water by evaporation, but
usually start dripping anyway. Many have plastic ater holding tank, or
in some cases a steel tank. You know what steel does.

The rear water should not have too much effect, unless
the unit has a vent, but most vent types are designed to suck out.

I would dilute bleach 2:1 or more, and use a spray bottle to fully coat every part of the
coils. You could also use OxyClean mixed with water.
From: GregS on
In article <i41a1v$h7f$1(a)usenet01.srv.cis.pitt.edu>, zekfrivo(a)zekfrivolous.com (GregS) wrote:
>In article <8cim3oF820U1(a)mid.individual.net>, "Bill"
> <billnomailnospamx(a)yahoo.com> wrote:
>>> I don't have access to the outside of the AC - I think I can't open it
>>> from the inside.
>>> If I spray with Lysol, should I spray the intake or just the blow out
>>> area?
>>>
>>
>>Spray in the intake. Also remove the filter and you will see "coils". Pour a
>>bit of bleach on the coils so it drips down to the bottom. This is where the
>>standing water will be and that is the source of the smell. The bleach will
>>kill the bacteria. Do this when you will be gone for awhile and open your
>>windows - run the A/C to get rid of the bleach smell.
>>
>>Newer window A/C units are designed to have standing water in them. The rear
>>fan blade splashes the water on the rear coils and this makes it run more
>>efficiently. But the standing water can stink!
>>
>>I carefully drilled holes in the bottom of mine (outside) so all the water
>>would drain out. End of problem...
>
>
>Window units have had standing water for cooling misting for as
>long as I can remember, about1960. Most start leaking after
>they rust out, decreasing efficiency. There are probably some that
>just drain. They are suppose to get rid of water by evaporation, but
>usually start dripping anyway. Many have plastic ater holding tank, or
>in some cases a steel tank. You know what steel does.
>
>The rear water should not have too much effect, unless
>the unit has a vent, but most vent types are designed to suck out.
>
>I would dilute bleach 2:1 or more, and use a spray bottle to fully coat every
> part of the
>coils. You could also use OxyClean mixed with water.

Forgot, I would add a few drops of fantastic or sililar to the bleach/water solution.
This is also my bathroom formula. The soap helps the liquid to fully coat
the aluminum or bathroom walls. It also has a cleansing effect.
From: Richard Fangnail on
I sprayed the AC with ordinary Lysol. The bad smell went away. I was
afraid the apt would smell like Lysol now, but it smells like nothing.