From: Rich on
Dave wrote:
>>> And with only electricity for heat? That's hardly a cheap housing
>>> solution. :) -Dave
>>
>> What makes you think the only option for heat is electricity?
>> Sure, electricity is the only utility installed on the property
>> but that doesn't mean a person couldn't get propane, oil or
>> something else delivered.
>>
>> Anthony
>
> Anthony - This is alaska we are talking about. Think about asking
> someone to deliver oil for you to antarctica and you'll get the idea.
> Worse, the town only has a population of 300 to begin with, 80 miles
> or so from the next nearest town. Yikes.
>
> I'm betting propane/oil is either not available, or prohibitively
> xpensive. -Dave

What temp would propane freeze or not work properly or the regulators may
not work at those -60 temps? Maybe that's another consideration?

Rich



From: Gene S. Berkowitz on
In article <45fd9757$0$1422$4c368faf(a)roadrunner.com>, anthonym40
@nothing.like.socal.rr.com says...
> Dave wrote:
> >>
> >> Be aware that this town of 300 is about 80 miles SW of Fairbanks,
> >> and winter temps can get down to -60 degF on a regular basis.
> >> This is an attempt to increase the year round population, so it's
> >> not the way to get a cheap summer-only cabin.
> >
> > And with only electricity for heat? That's hardly a cheap housing
> > solution. :) -Dave
>
> What makes you think the only option for heat is electricity?
> Sure, electricity is the only utility installed on the property
> but that doesn't mean a person couldn't get propane, oil or
> something else delivered.
>
> Anthony

A quick check on Google shows that there is a heating services company
in Nenana, which is approximately 15 miles north of Anderson by highway.

The Alaska Railroad serves Anderson, and there is a small airport.

It's also the location of the Clear Air Force Station, "Home of the 13th
and 213th Space Warning Squadrons", and it seems that AF personnel and
their families make up a good deal of the residents.

--Gene




From: Gene S. Berkowitz on
In article <45fdabc4$0$97259$892e7fe2(a)authen.yellow.readfreenews.net>,
noway(a)nohow.not says...
>
> >>
> >> And with only electricity for heat? That's hardly a cheap housing
> >> solution. :) -Dave
> >
> > What makes you think the only option for heat is electricity?
> > Sure, electricity is the only utility installed on the property
> > but that doesn't mean a person couldn't get propane, oil or
> > something else delivered.
> >
> > Anthony
>
> Anthony - This is alaska we are talking about. Think about asking someone
> to deliver oil for you to antarctica and you'll get the idea. Worse, the
> town only has a population of 300 to begin with, 80 miles or so from the
> next nearest town. Yikes.
>
> I'm betting propane/oil is either not available, or prohibitively
> xpensive. -Dave

There is barge service to Nenana also, owned by Crowley:

"Crowley and Service Oil & Gas, Inc. (SOG) sell products from
ChevronTexaco, Shell, Citgo, 76 Products, Lubriplate, Tesoro, Mobil, and
more.

Crowley sells packaged petroleum products for automotive, aviation,
construction, and marine applications at many locations. Crowley
delivers via barge to coastal and river locations. We understand the
demanding climate in Alaska and sell products to meet your needs."

...that includes heating oil and propane.

--Gene
From: OhioGuy on
> The main problem I see with this free land is that the land has only
> electricity for utility that can be used for heat. Figure a

There are actually several other sources of energy to consider:

1) Coal - there are plenty of coal mines out in the Montana and SW Canada
region. There are also trains that go to Alaska, so it shouldn't be too
hard to get coal delivered. Chances are that it is already being delivered
to the area for power plants and electricity generation

2) They could siphon off some of that crude oil from the Alaska pipeline and
burn it in an oil burning furnace

3) It is windy most of the time up there, so a windmill could easily
generate a good amount of electricity


From: Gene S. Berkowitz on
In article <etn5mf$ofm$1(a)aioe.org>, none(a)none.net says...
> > The main problem I see with this free land is that the land has only
> > electricity for utility that can be used for heat. Figure a
>
> There are actually several other sources of energy to consider:
>
> 1) Coal - there are plenty of coal mines out in the Montana and SW Canada
> region. There are also trains that go to Alaska, so it shouldn't be too
> hard to get coal delivered. Chances are that it is already being delivered
> to the area for power plants and electricity generation
>
> 2) They could siphon off some of that crude oil from the Alaska pipeline and
> burn it in an oil burning furnace
>
> 3) It is windy most of the time up there, so a windmill could easily
> generate a good amount of electricity

Considering that the main employer in the town is a PAVE PAWS
installation, I think you'll find that the living is a bit easier than
the "bear skins & bone knives" being discussed:

http://www.google.com/maps?q=Anderson,+AK&ie=UTF8&z=17&ll=64.30025,-
149.190795&spn=0.002782,0.012188&t=k&om=1

--Gene