From: Dennis P. Harris on
People are apparently lining up early Monday morning at Anderson
City Hall for a chance to buy free lots. The story was in
today's Anchorage Daily News http://www.adn.com , but better to
check the city's official web site at
http://www.anderson.govoffice.com/index.asp?Type=B_BASIC&SEC={6CFBB21F-BBF2-4DC4-936C-6486CF465B27}

"The City of Anderson is selling up to twenty-six lots at no
costs starting March 19, 2007 at 9:00 AM. Applications will be
selected on a first come, first served bases. A $500.00
refundable deposit will be required at the time of application.
Applicant will be required to build a residential home within 2
years from date of signed agreement. Other covenants and
restrictions apply. Lots are 1.3 acres in size, electrical and
phone has been installed. In April, the city council will hold a
lot selection meeting for applicants to select their individual
lots, based upon the first come, first served critieria. For
more information contact the city clerk @ 582-2500 or
coaclerk(a)mtaonline.net. "

Be aware that this town of 300 is about 80 miles SW of Fairbanks,
and winter temps can get down to -60 degF on a regular basis.
This is an attempt to increase the year round population, so it's
not the way to get a cheap summer-only cabin.



From: Don K on
"Dennis P. Harris" <NO_SPAM_TO_dpharris(a)gci.net> wrote in message
news:jouov2d3ue1ajav331bf9g49aqicpfhjk0(a)4ax.com...
> "The City of Anderson is selling up to twenty-six lots at no
> costs starting March 19, 2007 at 9:00 AM. Applications will be
> selected on a first come, first served bases. A $500.00
> refundable deposit will be required at the time of application.
> Applicant will be required to build a residential home within 2
> years from date of signed agreement. Other covenants and
> restrictions apply. Lots are 1.3 acres in size, electrical and
> phone has been installed. In April, the city council will hold a
> lot selection meeting for applicants to select their individual
> lots, based upon the first come, first served critieria.

Reminds me of the "dollar" houses that were sold in Baltimore in the 60's.
These were abandoned houses sold to anyone that would rehabilitate
them and live in them for a few years. By and large, it was pretty
successful, IIRC.

Don


From: Dave on

>
> Be aware that this town of 300 is about 80 miles SW of Fairbanks,
> and winter temps can get down to -60 degF on a regular basis.
> This is an attempt to increase the year round population, so it's
> not the way to get a cheap summer-only cabin.

And with only electricity for heat? That's hardly a cheap housing solution.
:) -Dave

From: Michael Black on
"Dave" (noway(a)nohow.not) writes:
>>
>> Be aware that this town of 300 is about 80 miles SW of Fairbanks,
>> and winter temps can get down to -60 degF on a regular basis.
>> This is an attempt to increase the year round population, so it's
>> not the way to get a cheap summer-only cabin.
>
> And with only electricity for heat? That's hardly a cheap housing solution.
> :) -Dave
>
Just before I saw the original post, I was watching something on tv about
living up north here in Canada. They mentioned a large cost to get the
food items up there, the result being really expensive food. Then they
showed the regrigerator section, and it was empty. They were hoping for
a shipment later in the week to restock.

I don't know whether it's still the case, but I remember hearing about how
in Barrow, Alaska, they basically order once a year, and then a barge brings
up the needed items. Presumably the slow boat is cheaper than flying things
in.

So yes, the land might be free (if someone actually rushes up there and gets
it), but they do have to consider the rest of their life living up there. At
the very least, it will require a radical shift in thinking.

Michael


From: Dave on

>>> Be aware that this town of 300 is about 80 miles SW of Fairbanks,
>>> and winter temps can get down to -60 degF on a regular basis.
>>> This is an attempt to increase the year round population, so it's
>>> not the way to get a cheap summer-only cabin.
>>
>> And with only electricity for heat? That's hardly a cheap housing
>> solution.
>> :) -Dave
>>
> Just before I saw the original post, I was watching something on tv about
> living up north here in Canada. They mentioned a large cost to get the
> food items up there, the result being really expensive food. Then they
> showed the regrigerator section, and it was empty. They were hoping for
> a shipment later in the week to restock.
>
> I don't know whether it's still the case, but I remember hearing about how
> in Barrow, Alaska, they basically order once a year, and then a barge
> brings
> up the needed items. Presumably the slow boat is cheaper than flying
> things
> in.
>
> So yes, the land might be free (if someone actually rushes up there and
> gets
> it), but they do have to consider the rest of their life living up there.
> At
> the very least, it will require a radical shift in thinking.
>
> Michael

I've been to alaska on business. Last time was a couple of years ago. In
general, everything is about 50% more expensive than the same (whatever)
would cost in the 'lower 48'. The only exception seems to be gasoline.
From memory, gasoline was actually a TAD cheaper than gasoline back home
(new hampshire) at the time. I remember thinking it was about 10 cents per
gallon less, all grades. Of course, they have lots of oil in the state.

The main problem I see with this free land is that the land has only
electricity for utility that can be used for heat. Figure a thousand bucks
or more per month (likely much more) to heat in the cold months. -Dave