From: Dodgy Geezer on
Chris Hills wrote:
> On 05/02/2010 16:34, Paul Georgeson wrote:
>> No, it's not reasonable for the seller to stand the cost of shipping.
>>
>> In the very first line of your post, you admitted it's "your mistake" and
>> yet you expect the seller to pick up the tab!
>>
>> Get a life...
>
> So you absolve the seller of all responsibility for not responding to
> the customer in the 2 business days between when the case was opened and
> when they shipped?
>
> For the record, I am not disputing anything with the seller and treating
> this as a learning opportunity.

If it was shipped by Royal Mail then the return won't cost the seller
anything. Just ask for a refund now, they might make you wait but, under
the DSR's, they cannot make the refund dependant on the return.

Seems like six of one and half a dozen of the other, I'd just be patient
and wait for the refund to come through. If it doesn't then start a
Paypal claim.
From: DubDriver on

"Chris Hills" <chaz(a)chaz6.com> wrote in message
news:hkgnuh$fn$1(a)chaz6.eternal-september.org...
> Hi
>
> I recently mistakenly ordered an item from an ebay seller. The seller is
> registered as a business and clearly outlines their responsibilities under
> soga. Shortly after I had made the order (within a couple of hours), I
> realised my mistake and opened a ticket through ebay for a return. This
> was done out of business hours. However, they still shipped the item 2
> business days later having not responded to my claim.
>
> Is it reasonable that they should cover the cost of postage since they
> should not have shipped the item in the first place (supposing that the
> cost of postage exceeded the cost of processing the order).
>
> Regards,
>
> Chris
>

Can a consumer cancel an order before they receive the
goods or where goods are lost in transit?

3.35 Yes. Where the DSRs give consumers rights to cancel, this right is
unconditional. If consumers cancel before they have received the
goods you must refund the total price of the goods, including any
delivery charges. Consumers who have cancelled under the DSRs
may refuse to accept delivery of the goods. Refusal in such a
situation cannot be treated as a breach of contract.

http://www.oft.gov.uk/shared_oft/business_leaflets/general/oft698.pdf



From: Chris Hills on
On 05/02/2010 18:24, DubDriver wrote:
> Can a consumer cancel an order before they receive the
> goods or where goods are lost in transit?
>
> 3.35 Yes. Where the DSRs give consumers rights to cancel, this right is
> unconditional. If consumers cancel before they have received the
> goods you must refund the total price of the goods, including any
> delivery charges. Consumers who have cancelled under the DSRs
> may refuse to accept delivery of the goods. Refusal in such a
> situation cannot be treated as a breach of contract.
>
> http://www.oft.gov.uk/shared_oft/business_leaflets/general/oft698.pdf

Thanks! That is pretty definitive advice.
From: Rob Morley on
On Fri, 05 Feb 2010 16:34:46 GMT
"Paul Georgeson" <Sgt Fuller Fan Club(a)Sgt.co.uk.com> wrote:

> No, it's not reasonable for the seller to stand the cost of shipping.
>
> In the very first line of your post, you admitted it's "your mistake"
> and yet you expect the seller to pick up the tab!
>
> Get a life...
>
You clearly don't understand the Consumer Protection (Distance Selling)
Regulations 2000. Get a clue.

From: Dodgy Geezer on
Rob Morley wrote:
> On Fri, 05 Feb 2010 16:34:46 GMT
> "Paul Georgeson" <Sgt Fuller Fan Club(a)Sgt.co.uk.com> wrote:
>
>> No, it's not reasonable for the seller to stand the cost of shipping.
>>
>> In the very first line of your post, you admitted it's "your mistake"
>> and yet you expect the seller to pick up the tab!
>>
>> Get a life...
>>
> You clearly don't understand the Consumer Protection (Distance Selling)
> Regulations 2000. Get a clue.
>

Most buyers don't either. Common sense should prevail here, no need for
lobbing quotes from regulations at each other. The seller will get his
goods back, the buyer will get a refund.
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