From: BB on
On Fri, 09 Mar 2007 13:57:03 -0700, timeOday wrote:

> I'm a naturally frugal/cheap fellow, but I'm starting to talk myself
> into getting a flat panel TV so I can mount it on the wall and regain an
> entire side of my front room.

I remember seeing those on TV and thinking how cool it would be to just
have a screen hanging on the wall. Then I started noticing how many inputs
and outputs I have on the back of the TV, and what a mess of cables would
be hanging off of them. Plus my speakers stick out almost as far as my
(rear-projection) TV.

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From: Dave on

>
>> I'm a naturally frugal/cheap fellow, but I'm starting to talk myself
>> into getting a flat panel TV so I can mount it on the wall and regain an
>> entire side of my front room.
>
> I remember seeing those on TV and thinking how cool it would be to just
> have a screen hanging on the wall. Then I started noticing how many inputs
> and outputs I have on the back of the TV, and what a mess of cables would
> be hanging off of them. Plus my speakers stick out almost as far as my
> (rear-projection) TV.

The main problem with wall-mounting a TV/Monitor or projection screen is
that the top of the viewable area of your TV should be NO HIGHER THAN eye
level, when you are seated in your normal viewing position. It is more
natural for human eyes to look straight ahead or even slightly DOWNWARD
while watching TV (or viewing computer monitors, also!). Beyond comfort
though, it is easier for the human eye to focus on objects when you are
looking 'down' at them. So having the -top- of your TV no higher than eye
level when you are seated improves both comfort AND image quality.

Hang the TV on the wall? Doesn't make any sense unless there is nothing
else on that particular wall. You can't regain space by hanging a TV on the
wall, for example. If you hang the TV on the wall, it would need to be hung
so low that you couldn't put anything else on that wall. Plus it probably
wouldn't be safe to hang the TV on the wall, unless you hang it way too
high. For example, if it's hanging on the wall, what stops you from walking
into it? What stops children/pets from knocking it off the wall?

Hanging it high enough to be relatively safe would be a very bad idea for
ergonomic and image quality reasons. -Dave

From: me on
"Dave" <noway(a)nohow.not> wrote:

>Hang the TV on the wall? Doesn't make any sense unless there is nothing
>else on that particular wall. You can't regain space by hanging a TV on the

I'm thinking Id rather just set the TV on a somewhat
low and longish table
From: me on
timeOday <timeOday-UNSPAM(a)theknack.net> wrote:

>I would rather do all the switching and converting with the receiver.
>Then the TV just needs an HDMI input. A TV will never have the
>switching capabilities of a decent receiver with dozens of connectors on
>the back.

So are you saying you'd rather just have a "monitor"
flat panel rather than a flat panel with built in TV
tuner?

Like the units Westinghouse makes that have no built in
tuners?
From: BB on
On Sun, 11 Mar 2007 17:31:24 -0500, Dave wrote:

> Hanging it high enough to be relatively safe would be a very bad idea for
> ergonomic and image quality reasons.

I've seen that. There's an event in my city where they fix up some big new
houses as "dream houses", and lately they've had some fancy electronics
setups. One house had a flat-panel mounted ABOVE THE FIREPLACE! The bottom
was about eye-level if you were STANDING! It was possible to watch it
sitting down, but extremely uncomfortable.

The installation was probably done by a home video contractor who should
have known better.

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