From: George Grapman on
spinner wrote:
> On Mon, 26 Nov 2007 09:41:54 -0800, nospam wrote:
>
>> I count out my quarters but let coin start count out everything else.
>
> I take my coins to my bank and use the coin counter there for free.


There is a bank in the NY-NJ area that lets non-customers use their
counter. Can't remember the name.
From: Don Klipstein on
In <4AD2j.2313$C24.1152(a)newssvr17.news.prodigy.net>, George Grapman wrote:
>spinner wrote:

>> I take my coins to my bank and use the coin counter there for free.
>
> There is a bank in the NY-NJ area that lets non-customers use their
>counter. Can't remember the name.

Commerce Bank?

- Don Klipstein (don(a)misty.com)
From: George Orwell on
On 26 Nov 2007 11:21:17 -0500, jeffj(a)panix.com (Jeff Jonas) wrote:

>I use the CoinStar only for pennies
>since vending machines don't take pennies,

There are two machines that accept pennies, the self-checkout machines at
Home Depot and Lowes. Besides dropping in all my spare quarters, dimes, and
nickels, you can also insert pennies. The machines also take dollar coins,
which I sometimes get in change when I buy stamps at the post office. It's
a great way to get rid of all your spare change when buying something at
the big hardware stores. I bought some air filters over the weekend, and
ended up inserting over $6 in coins before having to insert some bills...

Il mittente di questo messaggio|The sender address of this
non corrisponde ad un utente |message is not related to a real
reale ma all'indirizzo fittizio|person but to a fake address of an
di un sistema anonimizzatore |anonymous system
Per maggiori informazioni |For more info
https://www.mixmaster.it

From: sarge137 on
On Nov 25, 6:06 pm, sarge137 <rbooth9...(a)yahoo.com> wrote:
> On Nov 25, 4:20 pm, Bill <billru...(a)prodigy.net> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > sarge137 wrote:
>
> > > I don't use Coinstar, but every now and again I take a quart jar of
> > > mixed coins to my credit union. They don't charge me, but they run
> > > them through their coin counter, and credit my account. The deposit
> > > is usually between $60 and $80. It never occurred to me that the
> > > count might not be accurate. I think next time I'll waste an hour or
> > > so of my time and count them before I go. I don't think they'd
> > > deliberately cheat me, but are these machines ever calibrated? A
> > > dollar here, a dollar there...
>
> > And what's going to happen if their count is off? Will they
> > believe you over what their machine says (and how are they going
> > to get just your coins to check it)? I had a similar problem to
> > the other poster's. I bought 3 rolls of quarters from my bank
> > and the CS machine rang them up one quarter short. I never
> > thought to weigh them before dumping them in the machine to
> > check that they were the same, and I would expect my bank to
> > verify that they were correct before giving them to me. I
> > certainly trust them more than the CS machine. I wonder if they
> > ever make an error in the customer's favor?
>
> > Bill
>
> Well, I doubt there'll be a big enough difference for me to worry
> about it, but 'm going to do it anyway. Since I know my credit union
> wouldn't rip me off, I'm want to see how my results compare with the
> OPs.
>
> Since my interest is now piqued, I'm going to call my account rep
> tomorrow and ask how she'd handle such a dispute. I'll check back.
>
> Regards,
> Sarge- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Well, I took my half full jar of coins by my credit union this
morning. I counted before I left and came up with $27.83.

The teller came back with a ticket for that exact amount and I signed
the deposit slip. Not a scientific test, but I'm satisfied.

On the way out I stopped by my account rep's desk, and asked her what
would happen if I disputed the count. She told me that the coins are
held in a seperate bin until the deposit is finalized, so they can be
easily pulled for a recount. If the recount comes up the same they'll
give the customer the option of accepting the count as is; give them
tubes so they roll the coins themselves, which are then verified by
weight; or taking the coins elsewhere. They test their coin and bill
counters at least once a week according to criteria provided by the
manufacturer. The machines themselves keep internal reports of each
transaction and test. And finally, those periodic tests are reviewed
and verified during their annual federal audit.

I told her about this discussion thread and she said the Coinstar
machines aren't checked for consistency as often, if at all, like
those used in regulated and insured financial institutions. She
didn't know, and wouldn't speculate if they were designed the same as
hers, or if they could be manipulated in some way to deliberately
undercount the coins.

Regards,
Sarge
From: George Grapman on
Don Klipstein wrote:
> In <4AD2j.2313$C24.1152(a)newssvr17.news.prodigy.net>, George Grapman wrote:
>> spinner wrote:
>
>>> I take my coins to my bank and use the coin counter there for free.
>> There is a bank in the NY-NJ area that lets non-customers use their
>> counter. Can't remember the name.
>
> Commerce Bank?
>
> - Don Klipstein (don(a)misty.com)

Yes, thanks.
First  |  Prev  |  Next  |  Last
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
Prev: U4ik
Next: Web site for product reviews?