From: Evelyn C. Leeper on
Not only does Coinstar charge an exorbitant fee for counting your coins
(almost 10%), but they apparently frequently undercount the amount.

I took advantage of their recent offer for free coin counting if you
took an electronic gift certificate for one of their partner merchants
instead of cash. In addition, if you counted at least $30 worth, you
got an extra $10 amazon.com gift certificate.

So I got three rolls of quarters at the bank ($30) and dumped them in.
The total Coinstar registered was $29.61. I threw in two more quarters
to make $30.11. When I got home, I googled and discovered that this was
not an unusual occurrence.

They did send the additional $10 certificate, so I got $40.11 for my
$40.50, and spending money at amazon is not a problem for me, but I
would never use them without being offered a big premium like this.
Even if they don't take a commission if you take a certificate, they may
still short-change you.

--
Evelyn C. Leeper
I believe I found the missing link between animal
and civilized man. It is us. -Konrad Lorenz
From: Shawn Hirn on
In article <gXf2j.6$RG5.2(a)newsfe09.lga>,
"Evelyn C. Leeper" <eleeper(a)optonline.net> wrote:

> Not only does Coinstar charge an exorbitant fee for counting your coins
> (almost 10%), but they apparently frequently undercount the amount.
>
> I took advantage of their recent offer for free coin counting if you
> took an electronic gift certificate for one of their partner merchants
> instead of cash. In addition, if you counted at least $30 worth, you
> got an extra $10 amazon.com gift certificate.
>
> So I got three rolls of quarters at the bank ($30) and dumped them in.
> The total Coinstar registered was $29.61. I threw in two more quarters
> to make $30.11. When I got home, I googled and discovered that this was
> not an unusual occurrence.
>
> They did send the additional $10 certificate, so I got $40.11 for my
> $40.50, and spending money at amazon is not a problem for me, but I
> would never use them without being offered a big premium like this.
> Even if they don't take a commission if you take a certificate, they may
> still short-change you.

This topic has been discussed on this newsgroup before, not not
recently. Posting that warning was a good idea on your part. All coin
counting machines are subject to some amount of error. The mistake made
in your situation was 1.3% off, which isn't terrible, but it always
seems like the error is never in the customer's favor.

In my opinion, the only sensible reason to use those retail coin
counting machines is to get a deal like you received. People who use
a CoinStar machine just to count change are follish if they don't take
advantage of one of those gift certificate deals.
From: larry on
Shawn Hirn wrote:
> In article <gXf2j.6$RG5.2(a)newsfe09.lga>,
> "Evelyn C. Leeper" <eleeper(a)optonline.net> wrote:

>>So I got three rolls of quarters at the bank ($30) and dumped them in.
>>The total Coinstar registered was $29.61. I threw in two more quarters
>>to make $30.11. When I got home, I googled and discovered that this was
>>not an unusual occurrence.
>>
.. The mistake made
> in your situation was 1.3% off, which isn't terrible, but it always
> seems like the error is never in the customer's favor.
>
> In my opinion, the only sensible reason to use those retail coin
> counting machines is to get a deal like you received. People who use
> a CoinStar machine just to count change are follish if they don't take
> advantage of one of those gift certificate deals.

Did you open and count what you got from the bank? Seems a
lot of bank customer hand rolled rolls end up short. The
machine rolls from a large bank or the fed, with the paper
crimped at the ends like a can lid, are very seldom wrong.
The automated roll machine counts the coins and then
measures the height of the stack and won't roll unless both
are correct. Bags of rolled coins are weighed before they
are put in the vault.

One of our banks won't accept hand rolled coins without the
last 6 digits of the account number on them.

-larry / dallas
From: Sanity on

"larry" <noone(a)home.com> wrote in message
news:9qi2j.48067$eY.11526(a)newssvr13.news.prodigy.net...
> Shawn Hirn wrote:
>> In article <gXf2j.6$RG5.2(a)newsfe09.lga>,
>> "Evelyn C. Leeper" <eleeper(a)optonline.net> wrote:
>
>>>So I got three rolls of quarters at the bank ($30) and dumped them in.
>>>The total Coinstar registered was $29.61. I threw in two more quarters
>>>to make $30.11. When I got home, I googled and discovered that this was
>>>not an unusual occurrence.
>>>
> . The mistake made
>> in your situation was 1.3% off, which isn't terrible, but it always seems
>> like the error is never in the customer's favor.
>>
>> In my opinion, the only sensible reason to use those retail coin counting
>> machines is to get a deal like you received. People who use a CoinStar
>> machine just to count change are follish if they don't take advantage of
>> one of those gift certificate deals.
>
> Did you open and count what you got from the bank? Seems a lot of bank
> customer hand rolled rolls end up short. The machine rolls from a large
> bank or the fed, with the paper crimped at the ends like a can lid, are
> very seldom wrong. The automated roll machine counts the coins and then
> measures the height of the stack and won't roll unless both are correct.
> Bags of rolled coins are weighed before they are put in the vault.
>
> One of our banks won't accept hand rolled coins without the last 6 digits
> of the account number on them.
>
> -larry / dallas

But how do you get 29.61 with a roll of quarters?



From: larry on
Sanity wrote:

> "larry" <noone(a)home.com> wrote in message
> news:9qi2j.48067$eY.11526(a)newssvr13.news.prodigy.net...
>
>>Shawn Hirn wrote:
>>
>>>In article <gXf2j.6$RG5.2(a)newsfe09.lga>,
>>> "Evelyn C. Leeper" <eleeper(a)optonline.net> wrote:
>>
>>>>So I got three rolls of quarters at the bank ($30) and dumped them in.
>>>>The total Coinstar registered was $29.61. I threw in two more quarters
>>>>to make $30.11. When I got home, I googled and discovered that this was
>>>>not an unusual occurrence.
>>>>
>>
>>. The mistake made
>>
>>>in your situation was 1.3% off, which isn't terrible, but it always seems
>>>like the error is never in the customer's favor.
>>>
>>>In my opinion, the only sensible reason to use those retail coin counting
>>>machines is to get a deal like you received. People who use a CoinStar
>>>machine just to count change are follish if they don't take advantage of
>>>one of those gift certificate deals.
>>
>>Did you open and count what you got from the bank? Seems a lot of bank
>>customer hand rolled rolls end up short. The machine rolls from a large
>>bank or the fed, with the paper crimped at the ends like a can lid, are
>>very seldom wrong. The automated roll machine counts the coins and then
>>measures the height of the stack and won't roll unless both are correct.
>>Bags of rolled coins are weighed before they are put in the vault.
>>
>>One of our banks won't accept hand rolled coins without the last 6 digits
>>of the account number on them.
>>
>>-larry / dallas
>
>
> But how do you get 29.61 with a roll of quarters?
>

I figured it was a damaged quarter or a few canadiens got
mixed in ;-)

I'll start the math,
1 counted as a penny .01
1 counted as a dime .10
118 counted as quarters 29.50
120 29.61

feel like I back in my coin vault days in Houston ;-)

-larry / dallas

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