From: Vandy Terre on
On Wed, 28 Oct 2009 10:35:21 -0400, Susan Bugher <sebugher(a)yahoo.com> wrote:

><smile> Another "you know you're getting old when. . ." moment. Of
>course you can live without a dryer. I can remember when scarcely anyone
>owned a clothes dryer. (They became popular in the 1940-50s).
>
>I suggest you get a clothesline or a drying rack and try line drying
>before you give up your dryer. Line dried clothes are stiff and "boardy"
>if you don't have a good breezy drying day or if you dry them indoors.
>Things like comforters take "forever" to dry. . .

Clothing will not be as stiff and boardy if you add fabric softener to the final
rinse. If you are using a ringer washer/ top load with center agitator, use a
softener ball. The ball opens in the final rinse and saves you time watching
the washer for the right cycle.
>
>Dryers are a great time saver too, especially if you do lots of laundry.
>
>If the tradeoffs are acceptable to you, give up your dryer. For what
>it's worth, I'd hate to have to give up mine. . .
>
>Susan
>
>
>
>
>
>

From: Vandy Terre on
On Tue, 27 Oct 2009 21:31:47 -0500, me(a)privacy.net wrote:

>I'm thinking abt selling my clothes dryer and keeping
>the washer only
>
>I'm single and will be moving a lot and not sure I even
>need a dryer.
>
>Could you live without a dryer? If yes, how would YOU
>dry your clothes?

How much is moving a lot? A washer is a lot of weight to manage in a loaded
vehicle or to just move it. You might want to sell both if you are moving more
than once a year. Clothing can be washed by hand and hung on a drying rack
inside or clothes line outside. Just make sure you have at least three outfits
to use in rotation. One that you are wearing, one that is drying and a spare if
the drying one isn't dry.

Now if you still intend to move the washer with you, remember to pack it full
once it is loaded on the moving vehicle. Wrap dishes or other kitchen stuff in
dish towels and dish clothes before packing to reduce breakage. Avoid packing
any thing in paper/ noodle/ packing material that you can. Clothing, bed
linens, towels and small rugs can be used to wrap many things. Doing this cuts
down on the weight being moved and the amount of trash to discard. Ideally, you
cut your load down to what fits easily into what ever you drive. Find homes for
any pets if you will be renting. Finding a rental that allows pets can be very
difficult and expensive.

Now if you are really moving a lot as in near monthly, you might want to
consider purchase of a small motor home. Then just plan to live in what ever
camp ground is closest to place of work. But again, toss anything you don't
really need or want. Weight in any moving vehicle costs money to move.

Once upon a time I made the mistake of marrying a man that would not keep a job,
pay the bills, or buy food. As a result I spent three years moving. I got
rather good at it. While married to him I averaged five different cities a year
with at least three addresses per city and we lived in four different States. I
finally got tired of being the only one paying any bills or buying any food and
moving, divorced him. Now I own the land beneath my home and have been here
near twenty years.

From: sr on

<me(a)privacy.net> wrote in message
news:j7bfe59b45m66s5bpenmgh0b152giaja3n(a)4ax.com...
> I'm thinking abt selling my clothes dryer and keeping
> the washer only
>
> I'm single and will be moving a lot and not sure I even
> need a dryer.
>
> Could you live without a dryer? If yes, how would YOU
> dry your clothes?
I have a clothes dry, now. I don't dry clothes in it, but put the clothes
in it to shake out the wrinkles than I put the damp clothes on plastic
hanger and put them on the clothes line. Did the same at the nursing home,
it's a wonderful thing. Love the smell, also


From: sr on

"Napoleon" <anarch(a)666yes.net> wrote in message
news:m4hge5tffp9t0huqdg9kvg9nddfvc7stq8(a)4ax.com...
> On Tue, 27 Oct 2009 21:31:47 -0500, me(a)privacy.net wrote:
>>Could you live without a dryer? If yes, how would YOU
>>dry your clothes?
>
> Yes, I have dryer, but rarely use it. I hang my clothes outside and in
> the winter hang them in the basement. It makes it easier to have at
> least two indoor clothes lines and a drying rack for the small things.
> The dryer is mainly used for towels, that can get hard and itchy if
> dried on the line.
>
> Watch out for neighborhoods that don't allow you to hang clothes
> outside. It's ridiculous, they don't like the look of hanging clothes,
> but the humongous, chinese, plastic swingsets are fine.
=
In the winter, I hang clothes beside the woodstove area


From: Les Cargill on
Susan Bugher wrote:
> me(a)privacy.net wrote:
>
> > I'm thinking abt selling my clothes dryer and keeping
> > the washer only
> >
> > I'm single and will be moving a lot and not sure I even
> > need a dryer.
> >
> > Could you live without a dryer? If yes, how would YOU
> > dry your clothes?
>
> <smile> Another "you know you're getting old when. . ." moment. Of
> course you can live without a dryer. I can remember when scarcely anyone
> owned a clothes dryer. (They became popular in the 1940-50s).
>
> I suggest you get a clothesline or a drying rack and try line drying
> before you give up your dryer. Line dried clothes are stiff and "boardy"
> if you don't have a good breezy drying day or if you dry them indoors.
> Things like comforters take "forever" to dry. . .
>
> Dryers are a great time saver too, especially if you do lots of laundry.
>
> If the tradeoffs are acceptable to you, give up your dryer. For what
> it's worth, I'd hate to have to give up mine. . .
>
> Susan
>
>
>
>
>
>
>


But how much money does a clothes dryer cost to run? This:
http://www.csgnetwork.com/elecenergycalcs.html
says $0.30 per load. A whopping 30 loads a month is
$9.00 a month.... I can't imagine 30 loads a month - I
run about eight per person in the household...

--
Les Cargill