From: James on
Who here eat home aged beef without stomach distress? Google resulted
in articles on how to and other articles on why not to.

Anyone here ever got sick eating home aged beef?

Is the meat that's turned color on the grocer's shelf actually more
tender and have better flavor?

From: aem on
On Aug 30, 5:17 am, James <j0069b...(a)hotmail.com> wrote:
> Who here eat home aged beef without stomach distress? Google resulted
> in articles on how to and other articles on why not to.
>
I frequently put ribeye steaks on a rack over a tray and leave in the
refrigerator uncovered for 2 or 3 or 4 days before grilling them. It
doesn't make a big difference but we think it's usually an
improvement.

> Anyone here ever got sick eating home aged beef?

No, never.
>
> Is the meat that's turned color on the grocer's shelf actually more
> tender and have better flavor?

Don't know, don't buy it. -aem

From: Rod Speed on
James <j0069bond(a)hotmail.com> wrote

> Who here eat home aged beef without stomach distress?

I never ever get 'stomach distress' from food.

> Google resulted in articles on how to and other articles on why not to.

> Anyone here ever got sick eating home aged beef?

> Is the meat that's turned color on the grocer's
> shelf actually more tender and have better flavor?

Yep, thats why its done.


From: Clinton Wasylishen on
On Aug 30, 12:12 pm, "Rod Speed" <rod.speed....(a)gmail.com> wrote:
> James <j0069b...(a)hotmail.com> wrote
>
> > Who here eat home aged beef without stomach distress?
>
> I never ever get 'stomach distress' from food.
>
> > Google resulted in articles on how to and other articles on why not to.
> > Anyone here ever got sick eating home aged beef?
> > Is the meat that's turned color on the grocer's
> > shelf actually more tender and have better flavor?
>
> Yep, thats why its done.

The colour that the meat turns is natural - when exposed to air, that
is how it is supposed to look.

The red colour you see is not natural... not at all. They go the
extra mile to be sure that your meat looks as red as possible...
because that is what we have been conditioned to think is normal.

:o)

steve(a)bantrel.com

From: Paul M. Cook on

"James" <j0069bond(a)hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1188476260.106588.226530(a)w3g2000hsg.googlegroups.com...
> Who here eat home aged beef without stomach distress? Google resulted
> in articles on how to and other articles on why not to.
>
> Anyone here ever got sick eating home aged beef?

Not if it is done right.

>
> Is the meat that's turned color on the grocer's shelf actually more
> tender and have better flavor?

The key us dryness. Some decomposition is going on but the dryness keeps
that to a minimum. You are removing excess moisture and allowing the meat
to partially break down its connective fibers. Roting and aging are two
different things. Dry aged beef is more purple, rotten meat is brown.

Paul