From: petrolcan on
In article <h9gqms$rb3$1(a)news.eternal-september.org>, Observer says...
>
> "Rob Morley" <nospam(a)ntlworld.com> wrote in message
> news:20090924205429.379cbbbc(a)bluemoon...
> > On Thu, 24 Sep 2009 18:39:25 +0100
> > "Ben Short" <bshort(a)supanet.com> wrote:
> >
> >> I bought a battery for my phone which will not take a charge so is
> >> faulty. It is also a very bad fit and literally has to be forced into
> >> position so it's going back.
> >>
> >> However I was under the impression if an item was faulty it was the
> >> seller who had to pay for the return postage, but on the eBay page it
> >> states
> >>
> >> "
> >> What can I do about an item that is damaged/defective/not as
> >> expected/missing parts?
> >> Please contact the seller to resolve this issue. This seller accepts
> >> returns.The buyer pays for return postage.The seller's return policy
> >> is shown belowaccessorycityuk: Our no quibble returns policy means
> >> you can return the item to us within the first 30 days for any
> >> reason, you don't even have to give one!.Before you can return an
> >> item, you need to contact the seller."
> >>
> >> The BUYER pays for the postage??? Is this right
> >>
> > No, that's only for returns under the Distance Selling Regulations,
> > faulty goods come under the Sale of Goods Act. Tell the seller that
> > it's not of merchantable quality or fit for purpose, and that you
> > reject it. By the letter of the SOGA he has to arrange to collect it,
> > you have to make it available for collection, he has to reimburse you
> > all purchase costs including P&P. What more often happens is the seller
> > will refund without asking for the item to be returned, or he'll send
> > you a postage paid envelope, or he'll offer to reimburse you for the
> > cost of postage if you return the item.
>
>
> A poster who gives a nice factual answer, to the point, informative and no
> snide remarks or pointscoring - what a refreshing change. ;-)

It'll never last :-)
From: Rob Morley on
On Thu, 24 Sep 2009 22:00:29 +0100
"Ben Short" <bshort(a)supanet.com> wrote:

>
> "Roger" <roger20nospam(a)ntlworld.com> wrote in message
> news:h9gfjp$qf3$1(a)news.albasani.net...
> >
> > "Ben Short" <bshort(a)supanet.com> wrote in message
> > news:h9gasd$ibm$1(a)news.eternal-september.org...
> >>I bought a battery for my phone which will not take a charge so is
> >>faulty. It is also a very bad fit and literally has to be forced
> >>into position so it's going back.
> >>
> >
> > Refer to the answers given to all the other newsgroups you sent the
> > same message
> > to!
> >
> >
>
> Actually Roger it was sent to just one although you like to sound as
> if it was sent to many.

"Roger" likes to sound very important and knowledgeable, but we know
he's just a loony, so don't worry about it.

From: The Older Gentleman on
Rob Morley <nospam(a)ntlworld.com> wrote:

> No, that's only for returns under the Distance Selling Regulations,
> faulty goods come under the Sale of Goods Act. Tell the seller that
> it's not of merchantable quality or fit for purpose, and that you
> reject it. By the letter of the SOGA he has to arrange to collect it,
> you have to make it available for collection, he has to reimburse you
> all purchase costs including P&P. What more often happens is the seller
> will refund without asking for the item to be returned, or he'll send
> you a postage paid envelope, or he'll offer to reimburse you for the
> cost of postage if you return the item.

Concise and useful.

--
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Try Googling before asking a damn silly question.
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