From: MsMonarchdancer on
On Mon, 15 Jan 2007 10:45:51 -0800, Steve wrote:
> The cylinder clips in place with two spring steel clips at 180 degrees to
> one another. This allows it to be flipped for proper keyway orientation.
> It's designed for removal with a special tool but you you can also probe the
> clips from the rear with a sharp pick or other instrument.

It would be nice to have a DIAGRAM of those two apparently deeply hidden
clips as locating them was too difficult for me when I tried on my own. The
good news is I complained to Kwikset on their web site and they very kindly
responded multiple tikmes to my email.

The first time they responded, they said many people just leave the locks
upside down. When I responded back that I thought that was unprofessional,
they kindly wrote back that they would send me the tool for free.

I must say that my anger at them subsided at that point as the Kwikset
support person was truly trying to help me.

> Note that this
> lock is also vulnerable to a widely available tool that removes the cylinder
> from the front even while locked so the security that it provides is next to
> nill.

I've since learned this is a "grade 3" lock and that a grade 1 or 2 would
be better. Since the door has glass panels, I wonder if it really matters.
I guess breaking glass leaves a mess while removing the lock cylinder does
not?

If a thief removes the lock cylinder with that tool, does it leave a
telltale mess or is it transparent?


From: SMS on
Stormin Mormon wrote:
> Guess that makes TWO guys who have never worked on a Kwikset knob
> lock?

Actually I've worked on them extensively, doing re-keying at least three
times in my house, and once at someone elses house. I just never ran
into this situation.
From: DB on

<MsMonarchdancer(a)gmail.com> wrote in message
news:14892922mt1us.cayqy52fdpm4$.dlg(a)40tude.net...
> On Mon, 15 Jan 2007 10:45:51 -0800, Steve wrote:
>> The cylinder clips in place with two spring steel clips at 180 degrees to
>> one another. This allows it to be flipped for proper keyway orientation.
>> It's designed for removal with a special tool but you you can also probe
>> the
>> clips from the rear with a sharp pick or other instrument.
>
> It would be nice to have a DIAGRAM of those two apparently deeply hidden
> clips as locating them was too difficult for me when I tried on my own.

You have to remove the spindle and then probe down the spindle hole. If you
don't have the tool and have to do them one at a time it helps to insert a
key in the lock and use it to pull so the clip you did doesn't pop back
while you do the 2nd one. It can also just be knocked out like other people
have suggested.

Here it is step by step:

http://members.bellatlantic.net/~vze4vxnd/kwikrekey.html


From: thecanns on

DB wrote:
> <MsMonarchdancer(a)gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:14892922mt1us.cayqy52fdpm4$.dlg(a)40tude.net...
> > On Mon, 15 Jan 2007 10:45:51 -0800, Steve wrote:
> >> The cylinder clips in place with two spring steel clips at 180 degrees to
> >> one another. This allows it to be flipped for proper keyway orientation.
> >> It's designed for removal with a special tool but you you can also probe
> >> the
> >> clips from the rear with a sharp pick or other instrument.
> >
> > It would be nice to have a DIAGRAM of those two apparently deeply hidden
> > clips as locating them was too difficult for me when I tried on my own.
>
> You have to remove the spindle and then probe down the spindle hole. If you
> don't have the tool and have to do them one at a time it helps to insert a
> key in the lock and use it to pull so the clip you did doesn't pop back
> while you do the 2nd one. It can also just be knocked out like other people
> have suggested.
>
> Here it is step by step:
>
> http://members.bellatlantic.net/~vze4vxnd/kwikrekey.html

Has this horse been beat to death yet?

From: goma865 on

> If a thief removes the lock cylinder with that tool, does it leave a
> telltale mess or is it transparent?


Chances are they won't take the time to replace the pop-out.But even if
they do, it will look like someone drove a screw into the keyway.
The Kwikset-or Tylo, or "kwikkie" or "pop-job" is a very prolific and
cheap lock that lots of people buy because they are cheap.
I have done plenty of them when I first started doing locksmithing
years ago.
I don't work on them or rekey them that much because they are so easily
replaced.
Like the other guy said-you bring it to the shop-I'd probably do it for
free.
There's probably a lockie out there that would do that-or not for very
much.

Next time you want a lock for a door, go stand in front of the door.If
it's the front door stand on the outside and stand right in front of
where the knob/lever is.
Now position your body so that half of you is in front of the door and
the other half of you is front of the wall next to the knob/lever.
In other words imagine that the frame of the door (next to where the
knob/lever is)is a vertical line running parallel to the middle of your
body.
Stand a few feet away from the frame with your arms down.
Now bend your arms at the elbows like you are shooting 2 pistols from
the hip.
Which hand is closer to the knob/lever?
If left hand-It is a left hand door
If right hand-it is a right hand door
If the door opens outward in either case-it is reverse.
So it could be right hand-(If your right hand is closest and it opens
inward)or right hand reverse-(If your right hand is closest and the
door opens outward)
Or left hand-or left hand reverse.

Alot of grade 1 and 2 locks will be handed, so you are better off,
especially if you can tell a locksmith"Well, I need a deadbolt for a
Left-Hand door" or "I need a deadbolt for a right hand reverse door".

Hope this helps.
goma.