From: johannes on
What is the point of "hand salted" anyway?

Firstly, I prefer decide the salt level or otherwise by myself, not
somebody else doing it on my behalf. Especially not "hand salted".

Come to think of it, salt was the means of preserving food through
the middle ages. But people died fairly young.

Older houses had a small basements; it was colder down there, but
the cramped space and narrow stairs was a hazard for the house wives.

Then there were times when the milk man also delivered a ice block
to the front door! That provided enough cooling in an insulated
cupboard for about a week or so. Somehow there is a solution to
everything...
From: IanT on

"johannes" <johs(a)size282976242442fitter.com> wrote in message
news:4B6D75E4.46637769(a)size282976242442fitter.com...
> What is the point of "hand salted" anyway?
>

It is a method of preserving it. Would you prefer rotted fish?

> Firstly, I prefer decide the salt level or otherwise by myself, not
> somebody else doing it on my behalf. Especially not "hand salted".
>

So don't buy it. The body needs salt, so don't be taken in by very
misleading claims that salt is bad for you. It is no harm to anyone
that isn't a huge fat slag that drinks pint after pint each night, smokes
constantly and can only wobble to the post office to collect disability
allowance payments. If you are fit and healthy salt is no harm at all.


> Come to think of it, salt was the means of preserving food through
> the middle ages. But people died fairly young.
>

That is because of diseases and illnesses that were not treatable. Now
we have the NHS. So you trying to link salt to deaths is silly.
Even alcoholics now claim they "caught alcohol disease" due to their
addiction - something they chose, not something they caught!
Advances in sanitation and germ control, apart from filthy hospitals
tat people don't clean properly due to financial cutbacks, all help -
so people do live longer now. There have been huge advances in
medical procedures. You would have thought cancer could be treated
now, especially after the amount Limited companies registered as Charities
for tax purposes claim to be spending on research.

> Older houses had a small basements; it was colder down there, but
> the cramped space and narrow stairs was a hazard for the house wives.
>

It depends on how big the woman was. No Health & Safety Executive
in those days. How narrow is narrow! How cramped is cramped?
I have seen some NEW houses that can't accomodate a car in the garage
and in which miniature furniture needs building in each room so it will fit!


> Then there were times when the milk man also delivered a ice block
> to the front door!

Christ! how old are you! That was probably in the days when horses
were used as transport.

>That provided enough cooling in an insulated
> cupboard for about a week or so.

Oh the days before people had a fridge! You must be at least 130.

>Somehow there is a solution to
> everything...

There is, don't buy things you don't want and don't complain as no one
will listen anyway.


From: DubDriver on

"IanT" <noemail(a)email.co.uk> wrote in message
news:hkkep5$odc$1(a)news.eternal-september.org...
>
> The body needs salt, so don't be taken in by very
> misleading claims that salt is bad for you. It is no harm to anyone

Advice worth taking with a pinch of salt

From: johannes on


IanT wrote:
>
> "johannes" <johs(a)size282976242442fitter.com> wrote in message
> news:4B6D75E4.46637769(a)size282976242442fitter.com...
> > What is the point of "hand salted" anyway?
> >
>
> It is a method of preserving it. Would you prefer rotted fish?
>
> > Firstly, I prefer decide the salt level or otherwise by myself, not
> > somebody else doing it on my behalf. Especially not "hand salted".
> >
>
> So don't buy it. The body needs salt, so don't be taken in by very
> misleading claims that salt is bad for you. It is no harm to anyone
> that isn't a huge fat slag that drinks pint after pint each night, smokes
> constantly and can only wobble to the post office to collect disability
> allowance payments. If you are fit and healthy salt is no harm at all.

True, but most thing are already salted, so why add more? The TV chef
Gary Rhodes is particularly prone to sprinkle salt all over everything.

> > Come to think of it, salt was the means of preserving food through
> > the middle ages. But people died fairly young.
> >
>
> That is because of diseases and illnesses that were not treatable. Now
> we have the NHS. So you trying to link salt to deaths is silly.
> Even alcoholics now claim they "caught alcohol disease" due to their
> addiction - something they chose, not something they caught!
> Advances in sanitation and germ control, apart from filthy hospitals
> tat people don't clean properly due to financial cutbacks, all help -
> so people do live longer now. There have been huge advances in
> medical procedures. You would have thought cancer could be treated
> now, especially after the amount Limited companies registered as Charities
> for tax purposes claim to be spending on research.
>
> > Older houses had a small basements; it was colder down there, but
> > the cramped space and narrow stairs was a hazard for the house wives.
> >
>
> It depends on how big the woman was. No Health & Safety Executive
> in those days. How narrow is narrow! How cramped is cramped?
> I have seen some NEW houses that can't accomodate a car in the garage
> and in which miniature furniture needs building in each room so it will fit!

Quite true :) and they use short people and small furniture in their
advertisement.
>
> > Then there were times when the milk man also delivered a ice block
> > to the front door!
>
> Christ! how old are you! That was probably in the days when horses
> were used as transport.

Yes, we had the baker delivering in the morning with horse drawn carriage.
Horses were ideal for the door to door delivery; easy to start and stop
every few meters down the road. The same for coal delivery and for the
dust man. The wheels had car tyres with air. Gardeners were delighted by
scooping up the poop. Nowadays there is no door delivery and many bakers
don't bake and the postage go amiss.

> >That provided enough cooling in an insulated
> > cupboard for about a week or so.
>
> Oh the days before people had a fridge! You must be at least 130.
>

Not really. I think fridges came in the late 1950's

> >Somehow there is a solution to
> > everything...
>
> There is, don't buy things you don't want and don't complain as no one
> will listen anyway.

Thanks for listening :)
From: Steve on
Nomen Nescio wrote:
> It is so very easy to get in touch with Virginmedia

Do me, do me; please out me, o £337 one!

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