From: "Malcom "Mal" Reynolds" on
In article
<e647d5d0n30f3av76c912ntmfjap9rmfhp(a)4ax.
com>,
� Jeem � <not(a)thebeach.now> wrote:

> On Sun, 11 Oct 2009 20:16:59 -0700 (PDT), phil scott
> <phil(a)philscott.net> wrote:
>
> >On Oct 11, 1:14�pm, Marsha <m...(a)xeb.net> wrote:
> >> My milktoast sister does plan on consulting an attorney finally, but
> >> does anyone know what she has to do to get rid of a roommate
> >> (boyfriend)? �She owns the home outright. �He's a verbal abuser and
> >> plays mind games, like hiding her jewelry and undoing a couple small
> >> improvements he's made to her home. �She owns the home outright. �He has
> >> never paid anywhere near an equal share of the bills. �I'm thinking she
> >> may have to formally give him 30 days notice and then just evict him,
> >> probably with the help of some law enforcement.
> >>
> >> Marsha
> >
> >unless she as a written lease agreement she can simply change the
> >locks and leave
> >his stuff in plastic sacks on the front law, notify the police of
> >potential issues, and have
> >someone stay with her until the dust settles.
>
> Agreed. If there is no rental agreement or lease, she has no
> obligation to allow the BF to live with her. She is doing this just of
> her own free will. She had a romantic interest in the man and now she
> does not. That does not obligate her to allow him to live in her home.
> If they were renting an apartment or house and both names were on the
> lease, that would be a different story.

Of course if his name is on any of the
utilities...
From: "Malcom "Mal" Reynolds" on
In article
<e28ff199-0096-49d8-84f0-c0fb4c772e05(a)g1
g2000pra.googlegroups.com>,
"friesian(a)zoocrewphoto.com"
<friesian(a)zoocrewphoto.com> wrote:

> On Oct 12, 1:29�pm, � Jeem � <n...(a)thebeach.now> wrote:
> > On Sun, 11 Oct 2009 20:16:59 -0700 (PDT), phil scott
> >
> >
> >
> > <p...(a)philscott.net> wrote:
> > >On Oct 11, 1:14�pm, Marsha <m...(a)xeb.net> wrote:
> > >> My milktoast sister does plan on consulting an attorney finally, but
> > >> does anyone know what she has to do to get rid of a roommate
> > >> (boyfriend)? �She owns the home outright. �He's a verbal abuser and
> > >> plays mind games, like hiding her jewelry and undoing a couple small
> > >> improvements he's made to her home. �She owns the home outright. �He has
> > >> never paid anywhere near an equal share of the bills. �I'm thinking she
> > >> may have to formally give him 30 days notice and then just evict him,
> > >> probably with the help of some law enforcement.
> >
> > >> Marsha
> >
> > >unless she as a written lease agreement she can simply change the
> > >locks and leave
> > >his stuff in plastic sacks on the front law, notify the police of
> > >potential issues, and have
> > >someone stay with her until the dust settles.
> >
> > Agreed. If there is no rental agreement or lease, she has no
> > obligation to allow the BF to live with her. She is doing this just of
> > her own free will. She had a romantic interest in the man and now she
> > does not. That does not obligate her to allow him to live in her home.
> > If they were renting an apartment or house and both names were on the
> > lease, that would be a different story.
>
> It can get complicated though if any of the utilities are in his name,
> or if he has proof of payments. And since he has lived there multiple
> years, his ID will have that address on it. So, the police may not be
> able to make a decision that he doesn't have legal right to be there.
> And that means sending it to the court system, which will take time.
>
> We've had renters admit in court that they are more than 6 months
> behind on rent and have no money to pay. Yet they still get 30 days to
> move out while we have to keep the utilities on or risk being sued.
> The system in our state favors the renter and not the homeowner. We
> couldn't even turn off the cable or wireless internet. The guy was
> spending all day playing games on the internet. If we could have
> turned off the internet (which we were paying for), he would have had
> a reason to leave sooner.

Wow, internet access has finally made it
to the list of necessary utilities
From: Rod Speed on
� Jeem � wrote
> Rod Speed <rod.speed.aaa(a)gmail.com> wrote

>>> He did not pay any rent to her nor did he pay his part of the living
>>> expenses from what I have read. It was through her generosity that
>>> he lived there rent free because she was romantically involved with him.

>> He did however do some stuff that 'Marsha' claims he has undone now.

>>> He lived there rent free which is a privilege, not a right.

>> No one said anything about rights.

>>> I do not see how he can have any rights except for the
>>> aforementioned right to retain his personal possessions.

>> He does anyway in quite a few US jurisdictions.

>>> Perhaps you can elaborate on what other rights the BF may have?

>> Read up on palimony sometime.

> Palimony laws vary state to state.

What I said in different words.

And it aint necessarily black letter law thats relevant anyway.


From: Rod Speed on
� Jeem � wrote
> Marsha <mas(a)xeb.net> wrote

>> My milktoast sister does plan on consulting an attorney finally, but
>> does anyone know what she has to do to get rid of a roommate
>> (boyfriend)? She owns the home outright. He's a verbal abuser and
>> plays mind games, like hiding her jewelry and undoing a couple small
>> improvements he's made to her home. She owns the home outright.
>> He has never paid anywhere near an equal share of the bills. I'm
>> thinking she may have to formally give him 30 days notice and then
>> just evict him, probably with the help of some law enforcement.

> You know, Marsha, I think a very effective way of your
> sister getting her BF out of the house is to cheat on him.

He may not give a damn. Plenty of married people dont.

> I mean have a short-term affair and don't even try to hide it.
> Let herself get caught, like letting him "accidentally" see a
> love letter in her email or witness her kissing holding hands
> with another guy. If her infidelity will not get him out of the
> house, I do not know what would.


From: friesian on
On Oct 12, 10:00 pm, "Malcom \"Mal\" Reynolds" <atlas-
bug...(a)invalid.invalid> wrote:
> In article
> <e28ff199-0096-49d8-84f0-c0fb4c772e05(a)g1
> g2000pra.googlegroups.com>,
>  "fries...(a)zoocrewphoto.com"
>
>
>
>  <fries...(a)zoocrewphoto.com> wrote:
> > On Oct 12, 1:29 pm, « Jeem » <n...(a)thebeach.now> wrote:
> > > On Sun, 11 Oct 2009 20:16:59 -0700 (PDT), phil scott
>
> > > <p...(a)philscott.net> wrote:
> > > >On Oct 11, 1:14 pm, Marsha <m...(a)xeb.net> wrote:
> > > >> My milktoast sister does plan on consulting an attorney finally, but
> > > >> does anyone know what she has to do to get rid of a roommate
> > > >> (boyfriend)?  She owns the home outright.  He's a verbal abuser and
> > > >> plays mind games, like hiding her jewelry and undoing a couple small
> > > >> improvements he's made to her home.  She owns the home outright.  He has
> > > >> never paid anywhere near an equal share of the bills.  I'm thinking she
> > > >> may have to formally give him 30 days notice and then just evict him,
> > > >> probably with the help of some law enforcement.
>
> > > >> Marsha
>
> > > >unless she as a written lease agreement she can simply change the
> > > >locks and leave
> > > >his stuff in plastic sacks on the front law, notify the police of
> > > >potential issues, and have
> > > >someone stay with her until the dust settles.
>
> > > Agreed. If there is no rental agreement or lease, she has no
> > > obligation to allow the BF to live with her. She is doing this just of
> > > her own free will. She had a romantic interest in the man and now she
> > > does not. That does not obligate her to allow him to live in her home..
> > > If they were renting an apartment or house and both names were on the
> > > lease, that would be a different story.
>
> > It can get complicated though if any of the utilities are in his name,
> > or if he has proof of payments. And since he has lived there multiple
> > years, his ID will have that address on it. So, the police may not be
> > able to make a decision that he doesn't have legal right to be there.
> > And that means sending it to the court system, which will take time.
>
> > We've had renters admit in court that they are more than 6 months
> > behind on rent and have no money to pay. Yet they still get 30 days to
> > move out while we have to keep the utilities on or risk being sued.
> > The system in our state favors the renter and not the homeowner. We
> > couldn't even turn off the cable or wireless internet. The guy was
> > spending all day playing games on the internet. If we could have
> > turned off the internet (which we were paying for), he would have had
> > a reason to leave sooner.
>
> Wow, internet access has finally made it
> to the list of necessary utilities

When you rent rooms in a house and internet is either included in a
situation of utilities bundled with the rent, or the cost of internet
is divided by the renters, then yes, it would be considered a utility.
It was mentioned in the ad and the rental contract. So, shutting it
down when they don't pay rent is counted as harassment. We were told
by our lawyer that we could not shut it down without facing a lawsuit
from the deadbeat who was already 4 months behind on rent.

This is a situation where one house is shared by 3-4 renters. So, it
isn't a whole house or apartment being rented to one person who would
choose to get internet or not.