From: Samatha Hill -- take out TRASH to reply on
Marsha wrote:
>> Well she doesn't have to be forceful. She's the owner, her will is
>> law. Let the cops enforce it.
>
> She's has no self-esteem and doesn't like confrontation. Part of her
> problem is that she's never lived alone and she's afraid.


Ahh, might a domestic violence charge (emotional abuse) be pursuable?
From: Samatha Hill -- take out TRASH to reply on
� Jeem � wrote:
>
> If the OP's sister resides in the majority of states which do not
> recognize Common Law Marriage, then she has the right to allow her BF
> to stay or tell him to leave, if his name is not on the deed to the
> home.


In California, which does not recognize common-law marriage, she still
has to evict him, unless there is a domestic violence issue, which
honestly sounds like the most reasonable solution and the best bet.
From: Samatha Hill -- take out TRASH to reply on
� Jeem � wrote:
>
> Agreed. If there is no rental agreement or lease, she has no
> obligation to allow the BF to live with her. She is doing this just of
> her own free will. She had a romantic interest in the man and now she
> does not. That does not obligate her to allow him to live in her home.
> If they were renting an apartment or house and both names were on the
> lease, that would be a different story.

I know from personal experience that this is not true in California.

Marsha (are you the same Marsha I know from SMT?), you could call your
sister's local police department and given them details and ask what her
options are -- or have her call.
From: Samatha Hill -- take out TRASH to reply on
Marsha wrote:
>
> Yep. She's already "forbidden" from talking to the neighbor (a friendly
> male).


That in itself is good starting grounds for a domestic violence case.
From: Samatha Hill -- take out TRASH to reply on
What he said.

ranck(a)vt.edu wrote:
>
> Your sister needs to call a domestic abuse hotline. They are available
> everywhere, and the people there will have information about who to call
> and how to proceed. They will have the information that is pertinent to
> her local area and state. She should not wait until he gets violent, she
> should call now! At the least they'll be able to give her some perspective.
>
> She will probably make excuses, "he's not that bad," etc. Try to convince
> her that she doesn't have to take any of the advice she gets, but they
> will know about the legal issues and it won't cost her anything to just
> find out what her options are.