From: Rod Speed on
me(a)privacy.net wrote
> Rod Speed <rod.speed.aaa(a)gmail.com> wrote

>> I bought a new car instead of farting around with used cars.

> That may actually be MORE frugal than a used car in my opinion

Nar, its never frugal, just much more convenient.

Corse I did keep the previous one I bought new for
35+ years, so overall it is a pretty frugal approach.


From: Shaun Eli on
Food and wine. That's what saving all the money on everything else is
for!

Shaun Eli
www.BrainChampagne.com
From: missussex on
On Oct 24, 7:29 pm, Shaun Eli <missingch...(a)BrainChampagne.com> wrote:
> Food and wine.  That's what saving all the money on everything else is
> for!
>
> Shaun Eliwww.BrainChampagne.com

Exactly! We're retired and on a limited income. Our "new" car is 1993
Geo Prizm (the other car is a 1987 Accord). We live in a small one-
bedroom house and seldom travel. I shop for clothes at resale shops
and thrift stores. But we dine out at least once a week and love good
wine.

I am also not frugal when it comes to fragrances. I like Chanel and
Dior. The cheap stuff just doesn't cut it for me.
From: Michael Black on
On Sat, 24 Oct 2009, Shawn Hirn wrote:

> In article <XUxEm.1517$KA5.329(a)newsfe12.iad>, "OhioGuy" <none(a)none.net>
> wrote:
>
>> I was having a discussion with someone this past week, and had to admit
>> that while I try to be frugal in nearly every part of my life, I simply want
>> a long, hot shower - sometimes I take a half hour one. <this came up because
>> our new house has no natural gas hookup, and I've heard that the electric
>> water heaters can have trouble keeping up with usage>
>>
>> So this is probably the area where I'm not so frugal, and I allow myself
>> to indulge.
>
> Me? Probably travel. I live to travel. I don't have kids or a wife, but
> I do have a good deal of friends who also like to travel so I end up
> taking three or four vacations a year. For example, in June, I went to
> England to visit some relatives, then I hooked up with some friends in
> Liverpool. In August, I spent eight days with a friend in Las Vegas,
> then a few weeks later, I spent a weekend at the beach.
>
People are talking "frugal" without defining it.

There used to be a woman who posted here regularly who stated outright
she was frugal in her routine life so she could afford to go to Europe to
speed skate each year.

That seems to be a good definition, especially since it also overlaps with
frugality being about making good purchases. If I buy electronic gadgetry
at garage sales for very little, one could argue it's not frugal to do so,
yet if I'm doing it it's more frugal than the people I'm buying them from
who so badly had to have those items they paid top dollar for, and yet
no longer want.

Running a hot shower with nobody in it is not frugal, I don't think you
there is any way to spin it in a frugal way. But if it gives someone
pleasure, then it's hardly a bad thing. It likely isn't smart if someone
has lots of debt and isn't frugal generally, but by being frugal generally
it allows for some perks. Frugality shouldn't be about living a monk-like
existence.

One might assume that when you travel, you are frugal, trying to get a
good travel price. Someone who travels on a whim loses out on advanced
booking prices, someone who can plan ahead, or wait patiently, can save
money. ONe might also assume you don't rush out and buy a new wardrobe
each time you travel.

Michael

From: holarchy on
Michael Black wrote:
> On Sat, 24 Oct 2009, Shawn Hirn wrote:
>
>> In article <XUxEm.1517$KA5.329(a)newsfe12.iad>, "OhioGuy"
>> <none(a)none.net> wrote:
>>
>>> I was having a discussion with someone this past week, and had to
>>> admit that while I try to be frugal in nearly every part of my
>>> life, I simply want a long, hot shower - sometimes I take a half
>>> hour one. <this came up because our new house has no natural gas
>>> hookup, and I've heard that the electric water heaters can have
>>> trouble keeping up with usage> So this is probably the area where I'm not so frugal, and I allow
>>> myself to indulge.
>>
>> Me? Probably travel. I live to travel. I don't have kids or a wife,
>> but I do have a good deal of friends who also like to travel so I
>> end up taking three or four vacations a year. For example, in June,
>> I went to England to visit some relatives, then I hooked up with
>> some friends in Liverpool. In August, I spent eight days with a
>> friend in Las Vegas, then a few weeks later, I spent a weekend at
>> the beach.

> People are talking "frugal" without defining it.

It isn't possible to define it precisely.

> There used to be a woman who posted here regularly who stated outright
> she was frugal in her routine life so she could afford to go to
> Europe to speed skate each year.

Clearly not frugal.

> That seems to be a good definition,

Nope. Nothing like frugal.

> especially since it also overlaps
> with frugality being about making good purchases. If I buy
> electronic gadgetry at garage sales for very little, one could argue
> it's not frugal to do so, yet if I'm doing it it's more frugal than
> the people I'm buying them from who so badly had to have those items
> they paid top dollar for, and yet no longer want.
>
> Running a hot shower with nobody in it is not frugal, I don't think
> you there is any way to spin it in a frugal way. But if it gives
> someone pleasure, then it's hardly a bad thing.

An entirely separate matter to what is frugal.

> It likely isn't
> smart if someone has lots of debt and isn't frugal generally, but by
> being frugal generally it allows for some perks. Frugality shouldn't
> be about living a monk-like existence.

No one said it was.

> One might assume that when you travel, you are frugal, trying to get a
> good travel price. Someone who travels on a whim loses out on
> advanced booking prices, someone who can plan ahead, or wait
> patiently, can save money. ONe might also assume you don't rush out
> and buy a new wardrobe each time you travel.
>
> Michael