From: Niel J Humphreys on
"Peter Crosland" <g6jns(a)yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
news:dd6dnUx9Rf_UHTnWnZ2dnUVZ8iqdnZ2d(a)brightview.co.uk...
> "Jim" <jim(a)theseaside.co.uk> wrote in message
> news:hPTon.362963$Np2.16680(a)newsfe24.ams2...
>> Peter Crosland wrote:
>>>
>>> As it says on the picture for installation only on a Dell PC. Anything
>>> else is a breach of the licence.
>>>
>>
>> By chance it actually is for a 2nd hand Dell laptop I have bought :)
>> The picture says 'For distribution with a new Dell PC only' but the
>> seller says 'Can be installed on any PC' - seems contradictory to me?
>
>
> What can be done, and what it legal to do, are two different things. To be
> really accurate the licence is for it to be installed on one Dell machine
> only. That installation will already have taken place so installation on
> another machine, even a Dell, is still in breach of the licence. Having
> said that I don't see any moral issue with what you are proposing except
> it would lining the pocket of someone who clearly is acting illegally in
> selling them.


Also worth bearing in mind that Microsoft's licence terms are written for US
law and a lot of it is contrary to EU law.
--



From: John Whitworth on


"Jim" <jim(a)theseaside.co.uk> wrote in message
news:9CUon.470533$Dy7.451206(a)newsfe26.ams2...
> Mike wrote:
>> Actually I thought an OEM license is only intended for the machine on
>> which it was first installed. Not sure if you'll run into problems when
>> you come to activate it (Genuine Advantage may reject it)
>
> Thanks, Mike,
> That's my view as well (I bought an OEM version for a PC that I built
> myself a while back - no problems)
> I'm assuming that that this item is a genuine version of XP which has not
> been installed on any other machine...

I'd imagine that it's a CD which came with a brand new Dell machine, but was
surplus to requirements, due to the firm that bought the original PC using
imaged installs of XP. I.e. one corporate license code. So this one is
unlikely to ever have been used.

I did think that they locked manufacturer specific OEM CDs to only allow
installation onto a machine with the correct BIOS info. However, the
description does explicitly state otherwise. And you have a Dell anyway.

Strictly speaking, it is not really legit to be selling this, as it's
probably already been sold with a new PC. But technically I doubt you'll
have problems.

Interesting, though, that it says: "This is a LEGAL FULL edition complete
with the original unique COA Licence sticker which is designed to be used on
ANY PC. Please note as this software is the OEM version to comply with Ebay
policies it must be shipped with a piece of Hardware.". I wonder what piece
of hardware it will be shipped with. USB drive?

JW

From: John Whitworth on


"Peter Crosland" <g6jns(a)yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
news:dd6dnUx9Rf_UHTnWnZ2dnUVZ8iqdnZ2d(a)brightview.co.uk...
> "Jim" <jim(a)theseaside.co.uk> wrote in message
> news:hPTon.362963$Np2.16680(a)newsfe24.ams2...
>> Peter Crosland wrote:
>>>
>>> As it says on the picture for installation only on a Dell PC. Anything
>>> else is a breach of the licence.
>>>
>>
>> By chance it actually is for a 2nd hand Dell laptop I have bought :)
>> The picture says 'For distribution with a new Dell PC only' but the
>> seller says 'Can be installed on any PC' - seems contradictory to me?
>
>
> What can be done, and what it legal to do, are two different things. To be
> really accurate the licence is for it to be installed on one Dell machine
> only. That installation will already have taken place so installation on
> another machine

Not necessarily. If the original machine went to a corporate customer, and
imaged installs of XP were used instead, then it wouldn't have been needed.
At my company, every laptop has a unique license code on the bottom, but
every machine is running from the one corporate license code - i.e. the
imaged install.

JW

From: Niel J Humphreys on
"John Whitworth" <sexyjw(a)g_EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE_mail.com> wrote in message
news:4ba4a9f9$0$2474$db0fefd9(a)news.zen.co.uk...
>
> I'd imagine that it's a CD which came with a brand new Dell machine, but
> was surplus to requirements, due to the firm that bought the original PC
> using imaged installs of XP. I.e. one corporate license code. So this one
> is unlikely to ever have been used.
>
> I did think that they locked manufacturer specific OEM CDs to only allow
> installation onto a machine with the correct BIOS info. However, the
> description does explicitly state otherwise. And you have a Dell anyway.

Not really, you can install Dell operating system CD on any machine and the
COA will work fine. What will happen if you install it on a non Dell machine
is that you will have to activate the installation with MS within 30 days.
This will involve changing the keycode during activation to the one on the
COA sticker from what I imagine is the generic Dell keycode written into the
setup.

If you use a Dell operating system CD on any Dell machine then it will be
pre-activated and there will be no need to enter a keycode at all -
theoretically meaning you don't really need the COA.

> Strictly speaking, it is not really legit to be selling this, as it's
> probably already been sold with a new PC. But technically I doubt you'll
> have problems.

Under the EU Software Directive which the UK adopted under another name it
is legal, however MS have expensive lawyers and to date no-one has been able
to afford to challenge this in court and set statute.



From: Jim on
John Whitworth wrote:
>
> Not necessarily. If the original machine went to a corporate customer,
> and imaged installs of XP were used instead, then it wouldn't have been
> needed. At my company, every laptop has a unique license code on the
> bottom, but every machine is running from the one corporate license code
> - i.e. the imaged install.
>
> JW

Many thanks to you all for your helpful replies - this is a lot clearer
to me now :)
I shall order a copy and let you know how it goes...

Thanks again,

Jim