From: Peter Parry on
On Sun, 14 Mar 2010 20:02:34 +0000 (UTC), Moog <efcmoog(a)gmail.invalid>
wrote:

>Peter Parry illuminated uk.people.consumers.ebay by typing:
>
>>>Refer to the 2 year EU
>>>warranty, for instance. It is a "directive".
>>
>> No it isn't. There never has been a "2 year EU warranty", just a lot
>> of people who couldn't read.
>
>http://ec.europa.eu/publications/booklets/move/64/index_en.htm
>
>Explicitly....from page 7.
>"The fact is that a two year guarantee applies for the sale of all consumer
>goods everywhere in the EU"
>
>What was it you were saying again?

That you should read the Directive and not the political (and badly
translated) fluff in pretty coloured brochures. The two year period
is not a guarantee period. It limits how long sellers may be held
liable, but liability will be subject, amongst other things, to what
can reasonably be expected from the goods. In EU speak "warranty"
refers to the length of time in which a claim can be made. It does
not mean the same as "guarantee" or warranty in English when used as
an alternative word to guarantee.

Directive 1999/44/EC, the Sale of Consumer Goods and Associated
Guarantees Directive was introduced into English law by the Sale and
Supply of Goods to Consumers regulations 2002 (it was a minimum
harmonisation measure). As the UK already had a 6 year liability
period set by the Limitation Act 1980 there was no need to reduce it
to the 2 year EU liability limitations period.

The Directive is at

http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=CELEX:31999L0044:EN:HTML

the part which caused confusion for some was

"Article 5
Time limits
1. The seller shall be held liable under Article 3 where the lack of
conformity becomes apparent within two years as from delivery of the
goods. If, under national legislation, the rights laid down in Article
3(2) are subject to a limitation period, that period shall not expire
within a period of two years from the time of delivery."

So, quite simply, no two year guarantee exists. In fact there is no
requirement whatsoever for a manufacturer or seller to offer any
guarantee at all.
From: Rob Morley on
On Sun, 14 Mar 2010 20:02:34 +0000 (UTC)
Moog <efcmoog(a)gmail.invalid> wrote:

> Please do shut up. You have made some noise, you have not applied ANY
> substance.

Irony overload.

From: Steve Walker on
Rob Morley wrote:
> On Sun, 14 Mar 2010 20:02:34 +0000 (UTC)
> Moog <efcmoog(a)gmail.invalid> wrote:
>
>> Please do shut up. You have made some noise, you have not applied ANY
>> substance.
>
> Irony overload.

Mmm, I know who's opinion I trust and it doesn't begin with 'm'


From: Fran on

"Steve Walker" <spam-trap(a)beeb.net> wrote in message
news:807jhcFkisU1(a)mid.individual.net...
> Rob Morley wrote:
>> On Sun, 14 Mar 2010 20:02:34 +0000 (UTC)
>> Moog <efcmoog(a)gmail.invalid> wrote:
>>
>>> Please do shut up. You have made some noise, you have not applied ANY
>>> substance.
>>
>> Irony overload.
>
> Mmm, I know who's opinion I trust and it doesn't begin with 'm'

Morley and Moog both begin with "M".


From: Rob Morley on
On Mon, 15 Mar 2010 22:57:14 -0000
"Fran" <autumnacorn(a)vendredi.fr.com> wrote:

>
> "Steve Walker" <spam-trap(a)beeb.net> wrote in message
> news:807jhcFkisU1(a)mid.individual.net...
> > Rob Morley wrote:
> >> On Sun, 14 Mar 2010 20:02:34 +0000 (UTC)
> >> Moog <efcmoog(a)gmail.invalid> wrote:
> >>
> >>> Please do shut up. You have made some noise, you have not applied
> >>> ANY substance.
> >>
> >> Irony overload.
> >
> > Mmm, I know who's opinion I trust and it doesn't begin with 'm'
>
> Morley and Moog both begin with "M".
>
>
The disagreement was between "M" and "PP".

First  |  Prev  | 
Pages: 1 2 3
Prev: Sending to South Korea
Next: Christmas, in March ?