From: Don Klipstein on
In article <45C9DDB2.A320F430(a)rcn.com>, Rick wrote:

>If they can get the color right. How many "white" LED flash lights have
>you seen that aren't really white? More like a bluish white. Wanna see
>the dear wife put makeup on with those? 8-)

How often does anyone's wife apply makeup by light of any flashlight?

Also, I do agree that LED flashlights have a harsher, more bluish color
than incandescents ones have, but I do see the usual white LEDs having
the advantage over incandescents of not losing any energy efficiency at
all when moderately or moderately severely underpowered, while
incandescents have energy efficiency varying directly and significantly
more than proportionately with magnitude of overpowering/underpowering.
Get two flashlights, one incandescent, both taking same type/number of
battery cells, and both of same photometric output with identical fresh
batteries, with one being anh LED model and the other being an
incandescent model. Turn both on at the same time and see how they run
down, and chances are that the LED one has some usefulness as a flashlight
when the incandescent one is down to the brightness of an idling
cigarette - even if the LED one and the incandescent one had the same
photometric efficiency at "time zero".

- Don Klipstein (don(a)misty.com)
From: Michael Black on
Don Klipstein (don(a)manx.misty.com) writes:
> In article <45C9DDB2.A320F430(a)rcn.com>, Rick wrote:
>
>>If they can get the color right. How many "white" LED flash lights have
>>you seen that aren't really white? More like a bluish white. Wanna see
>>the dear wife put makeup on with those? 8-)
>
> How often does anyone's wife apply makeup by light of any flashlight?
>
> Also, I do agree that LED flashlights have a harsher, more bluish color
> than incandescents ones have,

I actually like the light from LED flashlights better than the light
from incandescent flashlights. There seems something unnatural about
the incandescent light, and the LED flashlights provide something that's
missing.

Michael
From: fluffy bunny on
In article <slrnesl9vu.o0e.don(a)manx.misty.com>,
don(a)manx.misty.com (Don Klipstein) wrote:

> In article <45C9DDB2.A320F430(a)rcn.com>, Rick wrote:
>
> >If they can get the color right. How many "white" LED flash lights have
> >you seen that aren't really white? More like a bluish white. Wanna see
> >the dear wife put makeup on with those? 8-)
>
> How often does anyone's wife apply makeup by light of any flashlight?
>
> Also, I do agree that LED flashlights have a harsher, more bluish color
> than incandescents ones have, but I do see the usual white LEDs having
> the advantage over incandescents of not losing any energy efficiency at
> all when moderately or moderately severely underpowered, while
> incandescents have energy efficiency varying directly and significantly
> more than proportionately with magnitude of overpowering/underpowering.
> Get two flashlights, one incandescent, both taking same type/number of
> battery cells, and both of same photometric output with identical fresh
> batteries, with one being anh LED model and the other being an
> incandescent model. Turn both on at the same time and see how they run
> down, and chances are that the LED one has some usefulness as a flashlight
> when the incandescent one is down to the brightness of an idling
> cigarette - even if the LED one and the incandescent one had the same
> photometric efficiency at "time zero".

This is one of those double-edged sword things.

I like to periodically remind my fellow bicyclists of this fact -- those
little red tail light blinkies may continue to blink, but after a "few"
(i leave the term undefined) hours of operation, they're just not very
bright, even though they're still the same wonderful red color.

So, when's the last time all the cyclists here changed their blinky
batteries?

..max