From: Shawn Hirn on
In article <45c094b9$0$97235$892e7fe2(a)authen.yellow.readfreenews.net>,
"Mike T." <noway(a)nohow.not> wrote:

> <BeaForoni(a)msn.com> wrote in message
> news:1170194924.192588.288550(a)j27g2000cwj.googlegroups.com...
> >I have changed all my light bulbs to flouresent and the savings was
> > considerable, until the utility company raised rates. Now I am
> > starting
> > to see LED bulbs. Seem kind of spendy. Anyone have experience with
> > them?
> >
>
> The LEDs produce intense light in a narrow beam. If you put a diffuser in
> front of them, the intensity drops to near zero.
>
> Short answer: LEDs are GREAT for flashlights, useless for household
> lighting. Other than night-lites, that is. LED night-lites are great. But
> the LED household lighting isn't significantly brighter than
> ight-lites. -Dave

A news report I recently heard on a public radio station said that a new
kind of energy efficient LED light bulb is available for residential and
commercial buildings. This news report said that Wal-Mart is the largest
corporate user of energy in the United States and they are buying up
these light bulbs in huge quantities to replace older bulbs in their
stores. They are replacing less efficient bulbs with the new LEDs as the
old bulbs burn out and they are already saving a lot of money on power,
but this also benefits the environment.

Evidently, as a result of Wal-Mart buying so many of these LED bulbs,
the price has gone up high and its hard for consumers to buy them for
home use because the manufacturing isn't up to demand yet, but that's
likely to improve over the next few months.
From: fluffy bunny on
In article <srhi-DFD342.09111931012007(a)newsgroups.comcast.net>,
Shawn Hirn <srhi(a)comcast.net> wrote:

> Evidently, as a result of Wal-Mart buying so many of these LED bulbs,
> the price has gone up high and its hard for consumers to buy them for
> home use because the manufacturing isn't up to demand yet, but that's
> likely to improve over the next few months.

I expect that LED's are going to virtually exterminate hot-filament and
gas discharge lamps in almost all applications over the next decade,
barring niche-applications such as [can't think of any]. They will,
soon, revolutionize the way we think about illuminating our homes and
offices.

In twenty years, old style lamps will be curios, much like kerosene
lamps.

As replace incandescents, they will obviate the need for terawatts of
illumination power over the next few years, and even, by dint of their
incredible reliability, save lives.

Its hard to overstate the breakthrough (or if you prefer, the profound
incremental steps) represented by the recent few years of LED
engineering. The LED flashlights for sale today are impressive, but
they're not state of the art, and the state of the art has a ways to go
before it plateaus. They're truly a modern miracle.

..max
From: Paul M. Eldridge on
I'm afraid the news report got things a bit garbled. Wal-Mart is
replacing the fluorescent lighting inside their refrigeration and
freezer display cases with LEDs at 500 of their U.S. locations, and if
they're happy with the results, they will eventually do the same at
all 6,700 stores world-wide. The primary reason for this change out
is that cold operating environments do not adversely impact LEDs as
they do fluorescents, so for this type of application, they're an
excellent fit. Rest assured, the overhead fluorescent lighting in
their stores will remain intact for many years to come.

Source:
http://www.geconsumerproducts.com/pressroom/press_releases/lighting/gelcore/Walmart_LED_display.htm

For anyone who wants to explore this topic in greater detail, see:

http://www.lrc.rpi.edu/programs/solidstate/pdf/SPIE4776-13_Raghavan.pdf

I can't imagine the conversion of these display cases will have any
material impact on supply and, if anything, it should help drive down
the cost of this technology.

Cheers,
Paul

On Wed, 31 Jan 2007 09:11:19 -0500, Shawn Hirn <srhi(a)comcast.net>
wrote:

>A news report I recently heard on a public radio station said that a new
>kind of energy efficient LED light bulb is available for residential and
>commercial buildings. This news report said that Wal-Mart is the largest
>corporate user of energy in the United States and they are buying up
>these light bulbs in huge quantities to replace older bulbs in their
>stores. They are replacing less efficient bulbs with the new LEDs as the
>old bulbs burn out and they are already saving a lot of money on power,
>but this also benefits the environment.
>
>Evidently, as a result of Wal-Mart buying so many of these LED bulbs,
>the price has gone up high and its hard for consumers to buy them for
>home use because the manufacturing isn't up to demand yet, but that's
>likely to improve over the next few months.

From: Rod Speed on
fluffy bunny <betatron(a)earthlink.net> wrote
> Shawn Hirn <srhi(a)comcast.net> wrote

>> Evidently, as a result of Wal-Mart buying so many of these LED bulbs,
>> the price has gone up high and its hard for consumers to buy them for
>> home use because the manufacturing isn't up to demand yet, but that's
>> likely to improve over the next few months.

> I expect that LED's are going to virtually exterminate hot-filament
> and gas discharge lamps in almost all applications over the next
> decade, barring niche-applications such as [can't think of any].

The most obvious example is where you need heat as well as light.

> They will, soon, revolutionize the way we
> think about illuminating our homes and offices.

Nope, it will just be another evolution.

> In twenty years, old style lamps will be curios, much like kerosene lamps.

The same claim was made when fluoros first showed up, didnt happen.

> As replace incandescents, they will obviate the need for
> terawatts of illumination power over the next few years,

We'll see. Cant see them being viable for exterior large scale lighting any time soon.

> and even, by dint of their incredible reliability, save lives.

> Its hard to overstate the breakthrough (or if you prefer, the profound
> incremental steps) represented by the recent few years of LED
> engineering. The LED flashlights for sale today are impressive, but
> they're not state of the art, and the state of the art has a ways to
> go before it plateaus. They're truly a modern miracle.

The same claim was made when fluoros first showed up, didnt happen.


From: Seerialmom on
On Jan 30, 4:07 pm, "Don K" <dk(a)dont_bother_me.com> wrote:
> "Seerialmom" <seerial...(a)yahoo.com> wrote in message
>
> news:1170200408.225596.222060(a)a34g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
>
>
>
> > The only thing I have LED's in at the moment is my hand-crank
> > flashlights. I believe there were quite a few LED Christmas lights
> > recently; more expensive initially but lower cost to run.
>
> Just wait until you get the bill for the carpel tunnel surgery. ;-)
>
> > Many cities have taken to use the LEDs in traffic lights as well.
>
> That probably has more to do with the high cost and effort to replace
> a burnt-out bulb than with LED energy efficiency.
>
> > I don't think you're the first to notice the correlation between
> > "lowering your consumption" and rates being raised. I've jumped
> > through many hoops making my house energy efficient (insulation, dual
> > pane windows, energy star appliances) but never really seeing any
> > dramatic decrease in my bill.
>
> You've got cause and effect backwards.
> The increasing rates caused you to lower your consumption.
> Your lower consumption didn't cause the rates to increase.
>
> Don

Actually what I was saying is that after doing all these supposedly
energy saving changes on the house not changing behavior otherwise,
the bill did not go down. Our local utilities have been promoting
various rebates on energy efficient appliances and house applications
but I believe the rates had also increased.

Speaking of electric bill....wonder how much I'll get slammed for my
apartment sized freezer running constantly for 4 days? My son left
the door slightly ajar the other day when he put something in it; I
just found out this morning when I saw water underneath and all the
items "frosty". Bleh! Guess I have to defrost when I get home;
luckily items are still frozen.