From: Anthony Matonak on
Jeff wrote:
....
> <URL: http://www.theinquirer.net/default.aspx?article=29472 />
>
> Nichia claims to have an LED with 113 lumens/watt and there's another
> lab model at 130 lumens. That takes us close to replacing household CF's
> with LEDs within the decade.

Lasers are more efficient at producing light than LEDs so,
presumably, at some point we'll start seeing lasers used for
general lighting.

Anthony
From: Don Klipstein on
In article <45c714dc$0$5821$4c368faf(a)roadrunner.com>, Anthony Matonak wrote:
>Jeff wrote:
>...
>> <URL: http://www.theinquirer.net/default.aspx?article=29472 />
>>
>> Nichia claims to have an LED with 113 lumens/watt and there's another
>> lab model at 130 lumens. That takes us close to replacing household CF's
>> with LEDs within the decade.
>
>Lasers are more efficient at producing light than LEDs so,
>presumably, at some point we'll start seeing lasers used for
>general lighting.

What lasers are more efficient at producing light than LEDs?

The most efficient lasers I ever heard of are infrared diode lasers, and
they have been more efficient than LEDs but LEDs are advancing faster and
just about catching up. I sure never heard of any visible light lasers
more efficient than some LEDs on the market now.

- Don Klipstein (don(a)misty.com)
From: Anthony Matonak on
Don Klipstein wrote:
> In article <45c714dc$0$5821$4c368faf(a)roadrunner.com>, Anthony Matonak wrote:
>>
>>Lasers are more efficient at producing light than LEDs so,
>>presumably, at some point we'll start seeing lasers used for
>>general lighting.
>
> What lasers are more efficient at producing light than LEDs?
>
> The most efficient lasers I ever heard of are infrared diode lasers, and
> they have been more efficient than LEDs but LEDs are advancing faster and
> just about catching up. I sure never heard of any visible light lasers
> more efficient than some LEDs on the market now.

I don't know where I got the idea but a quick google search found
me another fellow who thinks lasers have potential. :)

http://www.repairfaq.org/sam/laserdio.htm#diocss7a
: Consider: Some commercially available high power laser diodes have an
: overall conversion efficiency - electrical power in to optical power
: out - of over 50 percent. Current research is attempting to boost this
: past 80 percent.
:
: Incandescent lamps are only about 5 percent efficient; halogen lamps
: around 7 to 10 percent; and fluorescents, about 15 to 20 percent. High
: brightness LEDS suitable for lighting applications are advancing but
: are currently somewhere around halogen lamps in efficiency (though
: under some conditions, LEDs at low power may exceed 25 percent
: efficiency). But, it's unlikely that the LED could even match the
: laser diode due to the basic physics.

Anthony
From: Michael Black on
Anthony Matonak (anthonym40(a)nothing.like.socal.rr.com) writes:
> Don Klipstein wrote:
>> In article <45c714dc$0$5821$4c368faf(a)roadrunner.com>, Anthony Matonak wrote:
>>>
>>>Lasers are more efficient at producing light than LEDs so,
>>>presumably, at some point we'll start seeing lasers used for
>>>general lighting.
>>
>> What lasers are more efficient at producing light than LEDs?
>>
>> The most efficient lasers I ever heard of are infrared diode lasers, and
>> they have been more efficient than LEDs but LEDs are advancing faster and
>> just about catching up. I sure never heard of any visible light lasers
>> more efficient than some LEDs on the market now.
>
> I don't know where I got the idea but a quick google search found
> me another fellow who thinks lasers have potential. :)
>
But, the point of lasers is that they are a very small beam. They
wouldn't be useful if they weren't. SO the fact that you get a nice
read dot on the wall down the hall that's brighter than a flashlight
would give at the distance isn't important. Because you can't do
much in the way of lighting with that little red dot, while you can
do things with the flashlight. (Of course, there are things you
can do with the laser, but it doesn't include lighting.)

MIchael

From: Don Klipstein on
In article <45c77227$0$24461$4c368faf(a)roadrunner.com>, Anthony Matonak wrote:
>Don Klipstein wrote:
>> In article <45c714dc$0$5821$4c368faf(a)roadrunner.com>, Anthony Matonak wrote:
>>>
>>>Lasers are more efficient at producing light than LEDs so,
>>>presumably, at some point we'll start seeing lasers used for
>>>general lighting.
>>
>> What lasers are more efficient at producing light than LEDs?
>>
>> The most efficient lasers I ever heard of are infrared diode lasers, and
>> they have been more efficient than LEDs but LEDs are advancing faster and
>> just about catching up. I sure never heard of any visible light lasers
>> more efficient than some LEDs on the market now.
>
>I don't know where I got the idea but a quick google search found
>me another fellow who thinks lasers have potential. :)
>
>http://www.repairfaq.org/sam/laserdio.htm#diocss7a
>: Consider: Some commercially available high power laser diodes have an
>: overall conversion efficiency - electrical power in to optical power
>: out - of over 50 percent. Current research is attempting to boost this
>: past 80 percent.
>:
>: Incandescent lamps are only about 5 percent efficient; halogen lamps
>: around 7 to 10 percent; and fluorescents, about 15 to 20 percent. High
>: brightness LEDS suitable for lighting applications are advancing but
>: are currently somewhere around halogen lamps in efficiency (though
>: under some conditions, LEDs at low power may exceed 25 percent
>: efficiency). But, it's unlikely that the LED could even match the
>: laser diode due to the basic physics.

That is several years old and needs to be updated since LEDs have
advanced since then. I think I helped Sam Goldwasser out with
that one around 1999 or 2000 or so.

Meanwhile, those really efficient laser diodes remain all infrared.

- Don Klipstein (don(a)misty.com)