From: BeaForoni on
I have changed all my light bulbs to flouresent and the savings was
considerable, until the utility company raised rates. Now I am
starting
to see LED bulbs. Seem kind of spendy. Anyone have experience with
them?

From: throwitout on
On Jan 30, 6:08 pm, BeaFor...(a)msn.com wrote:
> I have changed all my light bulbs to flouresent and the savings was
> considerable, until the utility company raised rates. Now I am
> starting
> to see LED bulbs. Seem kind of spendy. Anyone have experience with
> them?

Won't see them replacing your household lights anytime soon.
Efficiency is about the same or worse than Florescent. I've yet to see
one match the light output of a normal light

From: Don Klipstein on
In article <1170194924.192588.288550(a)j27g2000cwj.googlegroups.com>,
BeaForoni(a)msn.com wrote:
>I have changed all my light bulbs to flouresent and the savings was
>considerable, until the utility company raised rates. Now I am
>starting to see LED bulbs. Seem kind of spendy. Anyone have experience
>with them?

I have some and I know quite a bit about LEDs.

The latest LEDs coming into production only have about the same
efficiency as fluorescents, and they cost a good order of magnitude more
per watt in initial cost, and they don't last forever (I mostly hear
50,000 hours and I have heard test results of some lasting less than
10,000 hours).

Most white LEDs in products on the shelves now are much less efficient
than fluorescents, mostly closer to incandescents than to fluorescents in
efficiency.

Screw-in LED "bulbs" are in the 1-5 watt range. With efficiency at best
the same as fluorescents, don't expect to see much of these exceeding
the performance of a 7 watt compact fluorescent or a 30 watt incandescent
floodlight or spotlight just yet.

My experience so far, although with units a year or two old already, has
been comparable to or weaker than a 15 watt incandescent in total light
output.

Please be aware of hype in LEDs. They are advancing and will see more
and more applications as they improve. But keep in mind that some have
touted them as more efficienct than fluorescents as far back as the late
1990's!

- Don Klipstein (don(a)misty.com)
From: Seerialmom on
On Jan 30, 2:08 pm, BeaFor...(a)msn.com wrote:
> I have changed all my light bulbs to flouresent and the savings was
> considerable, until the utility company raised rates. Now I am
> starting
> to see LED bulbs. Seem kind of spendy. Anyone have experience with
> them?

The only thing I have LED's in at the moment is my hand-crank
flashlights. I believe there were quite a few LED Christmas lights
recently; more expensive initially but lower cost to run. Many cities
have taken to use the LEDs in traffic lights as well.

I don't think you're the first to notice the correlation between
"lowering your consumption" and rates being raised. I've jumped
through many hoops making my house energy efficient (insulation, dual
pane windows, energy star appliances) but never really seeing any
dramatic decrease in my bill. If I could get "off the grid" through
solar I would (I suppose I could but not sure I want to invest $20,000
to save $120 a month).

From: Don K on
"Seerialmom" <seerialmom(a)yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1170200408.225596.222060(a)a34g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
>
> The only thing I have LED's in at the moment is my hand-crank
> flashlights. I believe there were quite a few LED Christmas lights
> recently; more expensive initially but lower cost to run.

Just wait until you get the bill for the carpel tunnel surgery. ;-)

> Many cities have taken to use the LEDs in traffic lights as well.

That probably has more to do with the high cost and effort to replace
a burnt-out bulb than with LED energy efficiency.

> I don't think you're the first to notice the correlation between
> "lowering your consumption" and rates being raised. I've jumped
> through many hoops making my house energy efficient (insulation, dual
> pane windows, energy star appliances) but never really seeing any
> dramatic decrease in my bill.

You've got cause and effect backwards.
The increasing rates caused you to lower your consumption.
Your lower consumption didn't cause the rates to increase.

Don