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From: Linda on
Serious now, please.

I go and get some high-priced super chemical-resistent rubber gloves for
doing the washing up. A few seconds after starting I cut a small hole
in the gloves. What an **** idiot!

Ok, get a dishwasher. Wash sharp knives separately. I know, I know.
But nothing seems to stop them getting holed.

Happens every few days. Am getting sick of this so no I'm going to
patch the nearly-new glove with a hole.

But that's where it gets hard. If I use a self-adhesive repair patch
for a bicycle inner tube (inside and maybe outside too (if the "hole" is
actually more like a small cut) then the hot water.

What sort of adhesive would make a good repair of the glove? Some
adhesives make the the rubber deform (it takes a few days). Would a
contact adhesive resist the heat of the water better? I like the water
hot.

Can anyone help. Am sure there could be lots of crazy replies and
that's ok,. but I also want to fix this!
From: dlzc on
Dear Linda:

On Mar 29, 7:45 am, Linda <nom...(a)riomail.com> wrote:
> Serious now, please.
>
> I go and get some high-priced super chemical-resistent

"super chemical-resistent"

> rubber gloves for doing the washing up.
....
> What sort of adhesive would make a good repair of the
> glove?

You want a chemical resistent glove, that is not resistent to
chemicals?

Surgeons have this problem all the time. They use thin gloves, and
they put on multiple layers.

Put surgical gloves (like a bicycle inner tube) on under your thick
gloves (like the tread on a bicycle tire). Won't be perfect, but will
be better.

David A. Smith

From: Lawrence on
On Mar 29, 9:45 am, Linda <nom...(a)riomail.com> wrote:
> Serious now, please.
>
> I go and get some high-priced super chemical-resistent rubber gloves for
> doing the washing up. A few seconds after starting I cut a small hole
> in the gloves. What an **** idiot!
>
> Ok, get a dishwasher. Wash sharp knives separately. I know, I know.
> But nothing seems to stop them getting holed.
>
> Happens every few days. Am getting sick of this so no I'm going to
> patch the nearly-new glove with a hole.
>
> But that's where it gets hard. If I use a self-adhesive repair patch
> for a bicycle inner tube (inside and maybe outside too (if the "hole" is
> actually more like a small cut) then the hot water.
>
> What sort of adhesive would make a good repair of the glove? Some
> adhesives make the the rubber deform (it takes a few days). Would a
> contact adhesive resist the heat of the water better? I like the water
> hot.
>
> Can anyone help. Am sure there could be lots of crazy replies and
> that's ok,. but I also want to fix this!

You don't say how you damaged them but it can be helpful if you keep
your nails short. No rubber gloves are expected to last
indefinetely. Just buy two pair. When one fails you will always have
the other pair. Then, next time you go out buy one pair. That way
you will always have a replacement. If you want to be really cheap
then replace only the damaged one and continue using the one thats
undamaged.

From: philipuk on
On 29 Mar, 15:45, Linda <nom...(a)riomail.com> wrote:
> Serious now, please.
>
> I go and get some high-priced super chemical-resistent rubber gloves for
> doing the washing up. A few seconds after starting I cut a small hole
> in the gloves. What an **** idiot!
>
> Ok, get a dishwasher. Wash sharp knives separately. I know, I know.
> But nothing seems to stop them getting holed.
>
> Happens every few days. Am getting sick of this so no I'm going to
> patch the nearly-new glove with a hole.
>
> But that's where it gets hard. If I use a self-adhesive repair patch
> for a bicycle inner tube (inside and maybe outside too (if the "hole" is
> actually more like a small cut) then the hot water.
>
> What sort of adhesive would make a good repair of the glove? Some
> adhesives make the the rubber deform (it takes a few days). Would a
> contact adhesive resist the heat of the water better? I like the water
> hot.
>
> Can anyone help. Am sure there could be lots of crazy replies and
> that's ok,. but I also want to fix this!

Never put sharp knives in the washing up bowl. It is dangerous. Keep
them outside the bowl and be careful when washing them!

Philip

From: Roger Mills on
In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
Linda <nomail(a)riomail.com> wrote:

> Serious now, please.
>
> I go and get some high-priced super chemical-resistent rubber gloves
> for doing the washing up. A few seconds after starting I cut a small
> hole in the gloves. What an **** idiot!
>
> Ok, get a dishwasher. Wash sharp knives separately. I know, I know.
> But nothing seems to stop them getting holed.
>
> Happens every few days. Am getting sick of this so no I'm going to
> patch the nearly-new glove with a hole.
>
> But that's where it gets hard. If I use a self-adhesive repair patch
> for a bicycle inner tube (inside and maybe outside too (if the "hole"
> is actually more like a small cut) then the hot water.
>
> What sort of adhesive would make a good repair of the glove? Some
> adhesives make the the rubber deform (it takes a few days). Would a
> contact adhesive resist the heat of the water better? I like the
> water hot.
>
> Can anyone help. Am sure there could be lots of crazy replies and
> that's ok,. but I also want to fix this!

Why wear gloves at all - washing-up liquid's not *that* harmful to the skin.
At least if you cut your hands instead of the gloves, nature will repair
them!<g>

[That was my mother's logic for sending me out in short trousers when I was
a kid, anyway - skin would re-grow on knees, but cloth wouldn't mend
itself!]
--
Cheers,
Roger
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