From: A.Lee on
Mungo "Two Sheds" Toadfoot <eastREMOVEkent(a)gmail.com> wrote:

> I want one.
> I'm not terribly rich at the moment.
> Which one of these two do I want, or does anyone know of a better one for
> <=�70?

Where are you?

I've got one of these:
<http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=120129103086&index
URL=1#ebayphotohosting>
Or:
<http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=220118423120&index
URL=1#ebayphotohosting>

(not my auctions)
For sale at the mo, �30. Used last year, but have now upgraded as I'm
going full-time in a gardening/handyman business, and need something a
bit bigger.
I'm in Leicester.
A bit impractical to post it really.
Alan.
--
To reply by e-mail, change the ' + ' to 'plus'.
From: Dave Liquorice on
On Sat, 09 Jun 2007 13:05:22 GMT, Palindrome wrote:

> What use do you plan for it?

That is the key.

Of the two posted I'd go for the second, it has more power and twin line
bump feed head. Twin line means less vibration as the head is balanced.
It'll cope with long rough grass and nettles but not anything woody like
brambles. For that a brush cutter is needed.

--
Cheers new5pam(a)howhill.com
Dave. pam is missing e-mail



From: The Natural Philosopher on
Mungo "Two Sheds" Toadfoot wrote:
> Palindrome wrote:
>> What use do you plan for it?
>>
>> If it is for more than trimming of the edges where a mower can't get,
>> I suggest that you consider a brushcutter:
>>
>
> It's just for lawn edges/along fences/around trees and sheds etc. I'm
> leaning toward the second one simply because it's just bigger all round.
>
> I take it the line doodah can be re-wound with line, rather than having to
> replace the whole thing with a new one?
>

Yes.

I am not sure a reliable one is to be had for under a ton new though.


> Si
>
>
>
From: spamlet on
They are death to trees: nearly all the trees in our town (that the council
can get at) have been ringbarked by idiots using these horrendous devices,
and the same seems to be the case in most other towns I've visited too.

Using them in a garden - as with other noisy power tools - takes away the
point of having a garden in any case.

S


"Mungo "Two Sheds" Toadfoot" <eastREMOVEkent(a)gmail.com> wrote in message
news:QaKdnYw8bdbhPffbnZ2dnUVZ8smonZ2d(a)pipex.net...
>I want one.
>
> I'm not terribly rich at the moment.
>
> Which one of these two do I want, or does anyone know of a better one for
> <=�70?
>
> <http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Product/partNumber/7201228/Trail/C%24cip%3D49998.DIY%2C%2Bgarden%2Band%2Bcar%3EC%24cip%3D50094.Garden%2Bpower%2Btools%3EC%24cip%3D50096.Grass%2Btrimmers.htm>
>
> http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Product/partNumber/7200195/Trail/C%24cip%3D49998.DIY%2C%2Bgarden%2Band%2Bcar%3EC%24cip%3D50094.Garden%2Bpower%2Btools%3EC%24cip%3D50096.Grass%2Btrimmers.htm
>
> Kin 'ell, sorry about the enormous URLs but they should work.
>
> Si
>
>


From: Andy Hall on
On 2007-06-09 14:27:36 +0100, Palindrome <me9(a)privacy.net> said:

> The Medway Handyman wrote:
>> Palindrome wrote:
>>
>>
>>> These do everything a strimmer does, plus one heck of a lot more with
>>> the blade in place - without constant stopping for the blasted lines
>>> when they break every two minutes.
>>>
>>> I have had a number of strimmers before finally buying a brush
>>> cutter..now I use it for everything that the petrol mower can't touch.
>>
>>
>> What's the difference? Is a brush cutter simply a strimmer that you
>> can fit a blade to?
>>
>>
>
> It's the blade that makes the difference. It will cut down things like
> thistles in an instant - whereas the line on a strimmer will take ages,
> assuming that it doesn't break first.. Even tree shoots, bracken,
> brambles, almost anything..ideal for clearing an unloved garden.
>
> The length of the thing keeps it away from toes. The blade is friction
> driven, so it will stop if it hits anything, without stalling the motor.

Is the arrangement with the line any better? I have yet to find a
strimmer with a reliable mechanism and reasonable lifetime.