From: Bob F on
Napoleon wrote:
> On Wed, 11 Aug 2010 07:38:46 -0700, "Bill"
> <billnomailnospamx(a)yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>
>> Maybe they are running a credit, criminal, and drivers license check?
>
> No. They can't without your specific consent. There is no specific
> consent on the application.
>
>> Then what people think of others is often a reflection of
>> themselves. If someone is honest, they would tend to think others
>> are honest and trust others. If someone is dishonest, they would
>> tend to think others are dishonest as well. So the way someone
>> responds to the request for their SSN might show if the person is
>> trusting of others or not. Also can the person do what is requested
>> of them, or is the person going to be a trouble maker constantly
>> informing the manager of what his/her "rights" are, etc.?
>
> OMG. I never expected this answer. Oh well, it's a post 911 world. The
> next time you get your identity stolen (as I have), get back to me and
> let me know if you will "comply" with any request to give your SSN.
> As for being a troublemaker, I can't believe how far America has
> fallen to "being a good little German."
>
>> The company is hiring a total stranger. They are best to find out as
>> much as possible about the job applicant before hiring...
>
> Then specifically ask for a credit/background check, which requires
> the applicant to either agree or disagree. Don't ask for an SSN on the
> general application. Sorry, I prefer to hide my SSN from total
> strangers as well.

But don't expect a job from people that disagree with you on this. Not going to
happen.


From: Cindy Hamilton on
On Aug 13, 1:44 am, rvanson <rvan...(a)yahoo.com> wrote:

> There is a company called Hireright that is a huge datbase for
> informtaion on many individuals.
>
> Once you are on the database your info is almost impossible to have
> removed or altered. Welcome to the Brave New World of the USSA.

However, in this case it's free enterprise compiling the database, so
your reference to the USSA (parallel to USSR, I assume) is
somewhat off the mark.
From: Cindy Hamilton on
On Aug 13, 1:41 am, rvanson <rvan...(a)yahoo.com> wrote:
> On Wed, 11 Aug 2010 08:19:23 -0500, Napoleon <ana...(a)666yes.net>
> wrote:
>
> >More and more people are asking for your social security number when
> >you fill out a job application. I always decline and write "upon hire"
> >instead.
>
> >I remember in the 80's and early 90's that the SSN was only given
> >after you were hired to prove that you could work in the USA (of
> >course other forms of ID could be used instead). I believe it's
> >illegal to ask for the SSN on a job application - what use is it? A
> >job application is not a credit check, which supposedly safeguards
> >sensitive info such as SSNs. A job application is just a sheet of
> >paper anyone can get their hands on. I don't trust giving out my SSN
> >to just anyone for no reason.
>
> >Of course all the jobs where I declined to give my SSN I was not hired
> >for. Could be a coincidence, or not.
>
> No, its not coincedence at all.
>
> The USA has been forming into a neo-fascist police state since before
> 9/11. I was asked to show the management my SS card to add on an
> application to rent an apartment a while back.

That does not make the USA a police state. That was a purely
private transaction. You are free to rent from someone who does not
need your social security card.

> They also wanted my drivers license wanted to copy the documents on
> the spot along with my personal check so they could have my bank
> account number too. Needless to say I declined to give them that
> information.

Which proves that there is still quite a lot of freedom here.

> There is little privacy to be had in the US anymore, sadly enough.
>
> Its next to impossible to do anything without all manner of checks.
> Some companies are taking hair samples to drug test before hiring. It
> wont be long till they want DNA samples just like in the sci-fi movie,
> "Gattica" and that was made before 9/11 and the Bush regime.

Which also has nothing to do wiht the government. You can blame
the private sector for all of this.
From: George on
On 8/13/2010 12:57 PM, Bob F wrote:
> Napoleon wrote:
>> On Wed, 11 Aug 2010 07:38:46 -0700, "Bill"
>> <billnomailnospamx(a)yahoo.com> wrote:
>>
>>
>>> Maybe they are running a credit, criminal, and drivers license check?
>>
>> No. They can't without your specific consent. There is no specific
>> consent on the application.
>>
>>> Then what people think of others is often a reflection of
>>> themselves. If someone is honest, they would tend to think others
>>> are honest and trust others. If someone is dishonest, they would
>>> tend to think others are dishonest as well. So the way someone
>>> responds to the request for their SSN might show if the person is
>>> trusting of others or not. Also can the person do what is requested
>>> of them, or is the person going to be a trouble maker constantly
>>> informing the manager of what his/her "rights" are, etc.?
>>
>> OMG. I never expected this answer. Oh well, it's a post 911 world. The
>> next time you get your identity stolen (as I have), get back to me and
>> let me know if you will "comply" with any request to give your SSN.
>> As for being a troublemaker, I can't believe how far America has
>> fallen to "being a good little German."
>>
>>> The company is hiring a total stranger. They are best to find out as
>>> much as possible about the job applicant before hiring...
>>
>> Then specifically ask for a credit/background check, which requires
>> the applicant to either agree or disagree. Don't ask for an SSN on the
>> general application. Sorry, I prefer to hide my SSN from total
>> strangers as well.
>
> But don't expect a job from people that disagree with you on this. Not going to
> happen.
>
>
Sure, but one of the best jobs I ever had was because the business owner
appreciated the idea of privacy and people who could respect his.

I just don't get the direction we are going in where so many people
don't seem to have a personal identity and feel the need to tell
everyone everything they do.
From: The Real Bev on
On 08/12/10 22:44, rvanson wrote:

> They are doing alot more then that.
>
> There is a company called Hireright that is a huge datbase for
> informtaion on many individuals.
>
> Once you are on the database your info is almost impossible to have
> removed or altered. Welcome to the Brave New World of the USSA.

Perhaps the US could earn money by renting out the FBI database. Or
maybe they already have...

--
Cheers, Bev
==================================================================
"Don't sweat it -- it's not real life. It's only ones and zeroes."
-- spaf (1988?)