From: Niel J Humphreys on
"John Hopkins" <glasshousejohn(a)ntlworld.com> wrote in message
news:1isun.44828$Yx6.40997(a)newsfe29.ams2...
> It seems that Ebay is now only going to allow 99p or lower auctions to be
> listed no more than 100 per month by non business users? I sell trading
> cards at reasonable prices and have had sold quite a few, they are only
> worth under 99p so from June I can only list 100 a month. The ones I sell
> are the ones left over from packs I bought to complete my collection.
>
> Also I have loads of card stock that I will never use and thought that
> offering cheap aperture cards would be a useful way of getting back some
> money on the card that I won't use, but NO Ebay says if I sell 'handmade
> items for profit' I have to register as a business?
>
> Any suggestions welcome

In the eyes of the law you are a business.

This change has been forced by all the Chinese sellers with multiple private
accounts flooding EBay with thousands of 99p items for no listing fees.



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From: MC on
John Hopkins wrote:

> It seems that Ebay is now only going to allow 99p or lower auctions
> to be listed no more than 100 per month by non business users? I
> sell trading cards at reasonable prices and have had sold quite a
> few, they are only worth under 99p so from June I can only list 100 a
> month. The ones I sell are the ones left over from packs I bought to
> complete my collection.


You must have a lot of "spare" cards if 100 a month limit is too small.
If you need to sell more than 100 a month of anything then you are more
than a casual "spare room clearout" seller and, thus, should really be
considered a business.


>
> Also I have loads of card stock that I will never use and thought
> that offering cheap aperture cards would be a useful way of getting
> back some money on the card that I won't use, but NO Ebay says if I
> sell 'handmade items for profit' I have to register as a business?
>


By definition, making something to sell for profit is a business
practice. So where is the problem?

MC
From: Rob Morley on
On 05 Apr 2010 23:54:40 GMT
"MC" <any(a)any.any> wrote:

> By definition, making something to sell for profit is a business
> practice.
>
But selling something that you made, at a profit, could be just a hobby.

From: The Older Gentleman on
Rob Morley <nospam(a)ntlworld.com> wrote:

> On 05 Apr 2010 23:54:40 GMT
> "MC" <any(a)any.any> wrote:
>
> > By definition, making something to sell for profit is a business
> > practice.
> >
> But selling something that you made, at a profit, could be just a hobby.

Indeed. But selling up to 1200 in a year almost certainly isn't.


--
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Try Googling before asking a damn silly question.
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From: Rob Morley on
On Tue, 6 Apr 2010 07:09:05 +0100
totallydeadmailbox(a)yahoo.co.uk (The Older Gentleman) wrote:

> Rob Morley <nospam(a)ntlworld.com> wrote:
>
> > On 05 Apr 2010 23:54:40 GMT
> > "MC" <any(a)any.any> wrote:
> >
> > > By definition, making something to sell for profit is a business
> > > practice.
> > >
> > But selling something that you made, at a profit, could be just a
> > hobby.
>
> Indeed. But selling up to 1200 in a year almost certainly isn't.
>
>
The relevant bit was not "from June I can only list 100 a month" but
"Ebay says if I sell 'handmade items for profit' I have to register as
a business". But I see now that he misquoted "You should register as
an eBay business if you make items yourself and sell them, intending
to make a profit".