From: Niel J Humphreys on
"Rob Morley" <nospam(a)ntlworld.com> wrote in message
news:20091127084742.65009968(a)bluemoon...
> On Fri, 27 Nov 2009 08:32:22 GMT
> petrolcan <petrolcanSPAM(a)gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> In article <20091127073932.7d3baa73(a)bluemoon>, Rob Morley says...
>> >
>> > On Thu, 26 Nov 2009 17:01:52 -0000
>> > Kim Andrews <bykimbo(a)hotmail.com> wrote:
>> >
>> > > If the seller's messed up, they have a clear choice of suck it up
>> > > and sell anyway, or grovel. They don't seem to want to do
>> > > either. :o) You, however, can't *force* them sell to you by any
>> > > practical means, so I'd say get your cash back by whatever means
>> > > is fastest, neg them and move on.
>> > >
>> > Neg them even if they give a quick refund?
>>
>> The OP said that the transaction happened four weeks ago.
>
> He's also been arsing around trying to get them to sell when they
> obviously don't want to - I wonder how much more quickly and easily
> everything would have gone if he'd just agreed to cancel when they
> asked.

Quite, the OPs greed is not helping this be bought to a conclusion. No doubt
he will blame the seller for this instead of accepting that human beings
make mistakes from time to time and conceding that he can't freeload on this
one.

From what I can see the seller held their hands up pretty early on and
admitted their mistake but the OP decided to be arsey about it. This put the
seller on the defensive as it was probably evident that the OP was being a
unreasomable person. So they (wrightly or wrongly) took steps to protect
their chances of getting an EBay fee refund by asking the OP to agree to a
mutual cancellation before processing the refund. Had the OP said 'fair
enough' accepted the seller made a human error in pricing from the start and
walked away like any reasonable person would do I imagine this would all
have been over and done with in a matter of minutes.

Ebay has many buyers like this who don't want to accept that sellers can
make mistakes in listings when they see they have a possibility of getting
something for nothing (or on the cheap), sadly an example of the society we
live in these days.


From: petrolcan on
In article <heo4lh$k96$1(a)energise.enta.net>, Niel J Humphreys says...
>
> "Rob Morley" <nospam(a)ntlworld.com> wrote in message
> news:20091127084742.65009968(a)bluemoon...
> > On Fri, 27 Nov 2009 08:32:22 GMT
> > petrolcan <petrolcanSPAM(a)gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> >> In article <20091127073932.7d3baa73(a)bluemoon>, Rob Morley says...
> >> >
> >> > On Thu, 26 Nov 2009 17:01:52 -0000
> >> > Kim Andrews <bykimbo(a)hotmail.com> wrote:
> >> >
> >> > > If the seller's messed up, they have a clear choice of suck it up
> >> > > and sell anyway, or grovel. They don't seem to want to do
> >> > > either. :o) You, however, can't *force* them sell to you by any
> >> > > practical means, so I'd say get your cash back by whatever means
> >> > > is fastest, neg them and move on.
> >> > >
> >> > Neg them even if they give a quick refund?
> >>
> >> The OP said that the transaction happened four weeks ago.
> >
> > He's also been arsing around trying to get them to sell when they
> > obviously don't want to - I wonder how much more quickly and easily
> > everything would have gone if he'd just agreed to cancel when they
> > asked.
>
> Quite, the OPs greed is not helping this be bought to a conclusion. No doubt
> he will blame the seller for this instead of accepting that human beings
> make mistakes from time to time and conceding that he can't freeload on this
> one.
>
> From what I can see the seller held their hands up pretty early on and
> admitted their mistake but the OP decided to be arsey about it. This put the
> seller on the defensive as it was probably evident that the OP was being a
> unreasomable person. So they (wrightly or wrongly) took steps to protect
> their chances of getting an EBay fee refund by asking the OP to agree to a
> mutual cancellation before processing the refund. Had the OP said 'fair
> enough' accepted the seller made a human error in pricing from the start and
> walked away like any reasonable person would do I imagine this would all
> have been over and done with in a matter of minutes.

Personally, I think the seller should honour the price that they were
listed at. If nothing else it will make sure that they don't make the
same mistake again.

> Ebay has many buyers like this who don't want to accept that sellers can
> make mistakes in listings when they see they have a possibility of getting
> something for nothing (or on the cheap), sadly an example of the society we
> live in these days.

Without wanting to start a row, you yourself are part of that society:

http://groups.google.com/group/uk.people.consumers.ebay/msg/104db5d600c8
151d
From: Fran on

"Niel J Humphreys" <admin(a)sznzozwdzoznzczozmzpzuztzezrzs.co.uk> wrote in
message news:heo4lh$k96$1(a)energise.enta.net...
> "Rob Morley" <nospam(a)ntlworld.com> wrote in message
> news:20091127084742.65009968(a)bluemoon...
>> On Fri, 27 Nov 2009 08:32:22 GMT
>> petrolcan <petrolcanSPAM(a)gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>> In article <20091127073932.7d3baa73(a)bluemoon>, Rob Morley says...
>>> >
>>> > On Thu, 26 Nov 2009 17:01:52 -0000
>>> > Kim Andrews <bykimbo(a)hotmail.com> wrote:
>>> >
>>> > > If the seller's messed up, they have a clear choice of suck it up
>>> > > and sell anyway, or grovel. They don't seem to want to do
>>> > > either. :o) You, however, can't *force* them sell to you by any
>>> > > practical means, so I'd say get your cash back by whatever means
>>> > > is fastest, neg them and move on.
>>> > >
>>> > Neg them even if they give a quick refund?
>>>
>>> The OP said that the transaction happened four weeks ago.
>>
>> He's also been arsing around trying to get them to sell when they
>> obviously don't want to - I wonder how much more quickly and easily
>> everything would have gone if he'd just agreed to cancel when they
>> asked.
>
> Quite, the OPs greed is not helping this be bought to a conclusion. No
> doubt he will blame the seller for this instead of accepting that human
> beings make mistakes from time to time and conceding that he can't
> freeload on this one.
>
> From what I can see the seller held their hands up pretty early on and
> admitted their mistake but the OP decided to be arsey about it. This put
> the seller on the defensive as it was probably evident that the OP was
> being a unreasomable person. So they (wrightly or wrongly) took steps to
> protect their chances of getting an EBay fee refund by asking the OP to
> agree to a mutual cancellation before processing the refund. Had the OP
> said 'fair enough' accepted the seller made a human error in pricing from
> the start and walked away like any reasonable person would do I imagine
> this would all have been over and done with in a matter of minutes.
>
> Ebay has many buyers like this who don't want to accept that sellers can
> make mistakes in listings when they see they have a possibility of getting
> something for nothing (or on the cheap), sadly an example of the society
> we live in these days.

I think you need to go back and reread the original post. The seller did not
make a simple mistake, they made a series of screw ups, INCLUDING
confirmation of dispatch. I don't see that as making an occasional mistake,
they sound grossly incompetent to me. The conclusion that the buyer is
trying to freeload simply cannot be drawn from any of their posts.

I'm with Kim on this one. A sensible customer focussed approach. And yes, I
have made mistakes in selling, but not one has rebounded on me, which I
ascribe to the way it was handled.


From: Willy Eckerslyke on
petrolcan wrote:

> I'm a firm believer in people learning lessons.

Well it's one way to earn a living. There'll never be a shortage of tory
MPs queuing up to be disciplined, even if they can no longer claim it on
expenses.
From: Niel J Humphreys on
"petrolcan" <petrolcanSPAM(a)gmail.com> wrote in message
news:MPG.2579aa1ae28510a9989abb(a)text.news.virginmedia.com...
>> Ebay has many buyers like this who don't want to accept that sellers can
>> make mistakes in listings when they see they have a possibility of
>> getting
>> something for nothing (or on the cheap), sadly an example of the society
>> we
>> live in these days.
>
> Without wanting to start a row, you yourself are part of that society:
>
> http://groups.google.com/group/uk.people.consumers.ebay/msg/104db5d600c8
> 151d

Don't be a Spacker :)

With respect, there is quite a difference in having a punt at something like
that and kicking off & crying about it when orders get cancelled. There is
no comparison to be made and that post is quite surprising & not something I
would expect to be coming from you.

--