From: RicodJour on
On Jul 29, 1:21 pm, Jim Elbrecht <elbre...(a)email.com> wrote:
>
> Not the OP-- but here's why I want *my* silver maple.   It is 150
> years old & has more character than I can afford to buy.   It also
> shades the back of my house and my patio.        
>
> It is messy-- it drops limbs, seeds, buds, and leaves during the year.
>
> But it also provides a few gallons of sweet maple syrup when the
> spirit moves me to tap it.

How long does it take to boil it down, and where do you do it?

R
From: Sum Guy on
RicodJour wrote:

> The non-cambium layers of a tree's wood is dead, but not dead in
> the way animals die. Wood is pretty stupid, pardon my French -
> it doesn't _know_ it's dead. So it keeps on trying to fulfill
> its function which is to transport water.

Again you are talking about the recently-dead layers (xylem) immediately
under the vascular cambium. Under that layer is the secondary xylem,
which no longer conducts water and is used to store waste products (in
some cases - resins). The secondary xylem is also known as heartwood,
and this is what is used to produce modern dimensional lumber.

Both the Xylem and heartwood (secondary xylem) are composed of dead
cells. They are structurally intact, but they no longer respire (ie -
they are not biochemically active).

When a limb of sufficient size is cut near the trunk, you will be
exposing this dead heartwood region, which is incapable of protecting
itself against weather, sun, fungal and insect dammage. Only new
cambium growth over the exposed area will eventually provide this
protection.

> It will do this whether or not it is still in tree form or
> built into a deck or whatever.

Not really. Heartwood is not a good conductor of water. In fact, it is
necessary that the heartwood not contain significant amounts of water,
since that would dammage it during freeze-thaw (expansion-contraction)
cycles in the winter.

> Any coating put on a tree that is intended to protect it from water
> will interfere with the tree's eons-long evolution of its healing
> process.

Heartwood is not normally exposed, so the application of a coating to it
will shield it against sun, rain, humidity, fungal and insect attack.
Normally the cambium and bark performs this function.

> It is important how, when and where to prune limbs. Improper
> pruning will not allow the tree to heal.

Yes, there is a correct cut-line to use for the most optimal removal of
a limb from the trunk. But we digress.
From: Sum Guy on
Jim Elbrecht wrote:

> Not the OP-- but here's why I want *my* silver maple. ...
>
> But it also provides a few gallons of sweet maple syrup when the
> spirit moves me to tap it.

Um - I didn't think that silver maples gave good syrup. That's why
sugar maples are called "sugar maples".
From: Gary Heston on
In article <ssd356tjkh759ch2ktmdmd7pv3iotl9vvt(a)4ax.com>,
Jim Elbrecht <elbrecht(a)email.com> wrote:
>On Thu, 29 Jul 2010 09:01:20 -0400, "Marty B." <none(a)none.net> wrote:
>-snip-
>>Silver maple is a garbage tree. The wood is soft because they grow so
>>fast. Surely you've noticed how they break during wind, and how fast those
>>things grow. Why you would want to save the thing is beyond comprehension.

>Not the OP-- but here's why I want *my* silver maple. It is 150
>years old & has more character than I can afford to buy. It also
>shades the back of my house and my patio.

>It is messy-- it drops limbs, seeds, buds, and leaves during the year.

>But it also provides a few gallons of sweet maple syrup when the
>spirit moves me to tap it.

That's a sugar maple. Leaves shaped like the one on the Canadian flag,
with dark grey-brown bark and well-behaved roots (they stay underground).

Silver maples have white bark, leaves are pointed ovals, dark green on
top and silver-white on the bottom, with roots that break the surface
every 2-3 feet.

Sugar maples are good trees; silver maples are not.


Gary

--
Gary Heston gheston(a)hiwaay.net http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

If you want to reduce the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere,
go plant trees.
From: Jim Elbrecht on
gheston(a)hiwaay.net (Gary Heston) wrote:

>In article <ssd356tjkh759ch2ktmdmd7pv3iotl9vvt(a)4ax.com>,
>Jim Elbrecht <elbrecht(a)email.com> wrote:
>>On Thu, 29 Jul 2010 09:01:20 -0400, "Marty B." <none(a)none.net> wrote:
>>-snip-
>>>Silver maple is a garbage tree. The wood is soft because they grow so
>>>fast. Surely you've noticed how they break during wind, and how fast those
>>>things grow. Why you would want to save the thing is beyond comprehension.
>
>>Not the OP-- but here's why I want *my* silver maple. It is 150
>>years old & has more character than I can afford to buy. It also
>>shades the back of my house and my patio.
>
>>It is messy-- it drops limbs, seeds, buds, and leaves during the year.
>
>>But it also provides a few gallons of sweet maple syrup when the
>>spirit moves me to tap it.
>
>That's a sugar maple. Leaves shaped like the one on the Canadian flag,
>with dark grey-brown bark and well-behaved roots (they stay underground).

No. no. no, and definitely don't.
>
>Silver maples have white bark, leaves are pointed ovals, dark green on
>top and silver-white on the bottom, with roots that break the surface
>every 2-3 feet.

Also known as swamp, river, white, soft, or water maple. The Latin
taxonomy is Acer saccharinum. An argument has been made that
Linnaeus meant for the Silver Maple to be a sugar maple-- it was a
century later that someone named the Eastern US 'sugar' maple.
("The Sugar Maples" by Benjamin Franklin Bush, American Midland
Naturalist, Vol. 12, No. 11 (Sep., 1931), pp. 499-503)

See my other post for my own experience with both species on my
property.

>
>Sugar maples are good trees; silver maples are not.

There are no bad trees-- just trees that don't please us sometimes.<g>
I am willing to put up with my Silver's foibles in exchange for its
benefits.

Jim