From: Sum Guy on
I've found that PL-Premium (polyurethane construction adhesive) to be a
very durable, strong and water-proof glue for wood for all applications
(indoor and outdoor).

I just filled a couple of holes on the trunk of a silver maple that have
been formed by some sort of insect over the past maybe 6-months. The
hole is in the face of a limb-cut that I made a few years ago and had
painted with black pruning paint. I was surprised how deep the "rot"
was - I was able to push the plastic dispensing nozzle of the glue
cartridge all the way into down into the trunk.

So even though I've already done it, I'm wondering if anyone knows how
well this stuff works at filling holes in tree trunks to prevent further
rot and allow the tree to grow over and eventually cover exposed
heartwood.
From: JimR on

"Sum Guy" <Sum(a)Guy.com> wrote in message news:4C50D026.EC3A74C9(a)Guy.com...
> I've found that PL-Premium (polyurethane construction adhesive) to be a
> very durable, strong and water-proof glue for wood for all applications
> (indoor and outdoor).
>
> I just filled a couple of holes on the trunk of a silver maple that have
> been formed by some sort of insect over the past maybe 6-months. The
> hole is in the face of a limb-cut that I made a few years ago and had
> painted with black pruning paint. I was surprised how deep the "rot"
> was - I was able to push the plastic dispensing nozzle of the glue
> cartridge all the way into down into the trunk.
>
> So even though I've already done it, I'm wondering if anyone knows how
> well this stuff works at filling holes in tree trunks to prevent further
> rot and allow the tree to grow over and eventually cover exposed
> heartwood.

Using pruning paint is not a recommended procedure because it traps moisture
in the cavity and encourages rot, such as you found. It's better to leave
this type of wound alone and let the tree heal itself. (Palms are a
different matter . . . as monocots they don't heal . . .)


From: Sum Guy on
JimR wrote:

> Using pruning paint is not a recommended procedure because it traps
> moisture in the cavity and encourages rot, such as you found.

This was insect-induced rot.

Moisture could not be trapped - this is a vertical surface we're talking
about - roughly a circle about 3" diameter.

Wood protected by oil-based coatings tends to weather better than left
untreated.

It's funny how pruning paint is somehow not good for exposed wood, yet
you see people applying coatings to their decks and other exposed wood
all the time.

I've also found that pruning paint is good when applied to the top
surface of horizontal limbs near the trunk that squirrels tend to tear
apart - dammage that most people don't see because it's over their
heads. The squirrels don't find the bark so tasty with the paint.
From: Evan on
On Jul 29, 12:26 am, Sum Guy <S...(a)Guy.com> wrote:

> It's funny how pruning paint is somehow not good for exposed wood, yet
> you see people applying coatings to their decks and other exposed wood
> all the time.


Decks and other exposed wood which has been cut and milled
into lumber is no longer alive...

Wood on a tree is still alive and growing...

It is best to leave tree wounds alone and allow them to heal
naturally... Exceptions to this logic are rare...

~~ Evan
From: ransley on
On Jul 28, 11:26 pm, Sum Guy <S...(a)Guy.com> wrote:
> JimR wrote:
> > Using pruning paint is not a recommended procedure because it traps
> > moisture in the cavity and encourages rot, such as you found.
>
> This was insect-induced rot.
>
> Moisture could not be trapped - this is a vertical surface we're talking
> about - roughly a circle about 3" diameter.  
>
> Wood protected by oil-based coatings tends to weather better than left
> untreated.
>
> It's funny how pruning paint is somehow not good for exposed wood, yet
> you see people applying coatings to their decks and other exposed wood
> all the time.
>
> I've also found that pruning paint is good when applied to the top
> surface of horizontal limbs near the trunk that squirrels tend to tear
> apart - dammage that most people don't see because it's over their
> heads.  The squirrels don't find the bark so tasty with the paint.

what insect makes a hole 3"