From: Jim Elbrecht on
On Thu, 29 Jul 2010 00:26:22 -0400, Sum Guy <Sum(a)Guy.com> wrote:

>JimR wrote:
>
>> Using pruning paint is not a recommended procedure because it traps
>> moisture in the cavity and encourages rot, such as you found.
>
>This was insect-induced rot.

What insect *induces* rot? All the wood eating critters I know
about show up after the wood is dead.

>
>Moisture could not be trapped - this is a vertical surface we're talking
>about - roughly a circle about 3" diameter.
>
>Wood protected by oil-based coatings tends to weather better than left
>untreated.
>
>It's funny how pruning paint is somehow not good for exposed wood, yet
>you see people applying coatings to their decks and other exposed wood
>all the time.

Those decks and stuff are *dead* wood. Presumably you cut the branch
off on a live tree. The tree will bleed and heal the wound much
better without being insulted further by some foreign sealer.

>
>I've also found that pruning paint is good when applied to the top
>surface of horizontal limbs near the trunk that squirrels tend to tear
>apart - dammage that most people don't see because it's over their
>heads. The squirrels don't find the bark so tasty with the paint.

I prefer to apply lead directly to the squirrels. But I don't think
squirrels do any damage to hollows in trees

Jim
From: Sum Guy on
Jim Elbrecht wrote:

> >This was insect-induced rot.
>
> What insect *induces* rot?

By rot, I mean the development of cracks, fissures, cavities and holes
caused by the removal of wood caused by insect activity. I guess I used
the wrong term.

> All the wood eating critters I know about show up after the
> wood is dead.

When you cut a large limb off a tree, the inner wood that you expose
*is* dead. The only living part of the trunk is the bark.

> Those decks and stuff are *dead* wood. Presumably you cut the
> branch off on a live tree. The tree will bleed and heal the
> wound much better without being insulted further by some
> foreign sealer.

If the cut is large enough, it will expose dead wood, and that wood is
vulnerable to insect dammage and weather-related dammage (actual rot,
fungus, etc). This dammage may set in before the tree has enough time
to grow around and cover the exposed surface with new bark.
From: Jim Elbrecht on
On Thu, 29 Jul 2010 19:27:30 -0400, Sum Guy <Sum(a)Guy.com> wrote:

>Jim Elbrecht wrote:
>
>> Not the OP-- but here's why I want *my* silver maple. ...
>>
>> But it also provides a few gallons of sweet maple syrup when the
>> spirit moves me to tap it.
>
>Um - I didn't think that silver maples gave good syrup. That's why
>sugar maples are called "sugar maples".

I have 2 sugar maples on the other side of my house. Probably about
the same age as my silver- about 2feet in diameter. [the silver is
3-4] I tapped them a couple years. They gave less sap and it was
not as sweet as the silver.

I've talked to others with the same experience. Sugar maples are
less prone to limb damage and don't have surface roots. But other
than that I don't know why sugarbushes don't use them more.

Jim
[BTW- I've never tapped them, but others have extolled the virtues of
white birch and Box Elder [aka Black Maple] sap.]