From: Roger Shoaf on
If I may suggest a frugal alternative? Since you said Sears I assume this
is a Kenmore, AKA Whirlpool.

While It might not be worth $175 to replace the transmission, quite often
you can pick up perfectly functional machines on craigslist or out of the
want ads for $25 to $75. Often these machines are being sold by someone
that is moving to a place with machines in place or some other reason other
than failure.

The nice thing about these machines is that the parts are cheap and easy to
repair. While not as energy efficient as the new whizbang front loaders,
they do a good job at cleaning and the ones (front loaders) are really
expensive to repair as they have lots of electronics that go on the fritz.

If color or style is an issue, your old cabinet might fit right on the $50
replacement.

--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
they come up with this striped stuff.

"WoolyGooly" <boogers(a)lots.of.snot> wrote in message
news:lo2jv2dkfmt99pajt6sotb5vutom37l1k6(a)4ax.com...
> On Thu, 15 Mar 2007 10:16:27 -0700, "Roger Shoaf"
> <shoaf(a)nospamsyix.com> wrote:
>
> >What exactly is wrong with the washer, and what brand is it?
>
> My mechanic (aka husband) says the gearbox has siezed and is
> unrepairable. A replacement gearbox is about $175 with tax and
> shipping (because of course Sears doesn't actually stock parts for
> sale, one must order parts and pay not only local sales tax but also
> shipping, bleh).
>
> Today I'm scavenging the motor and timer box for future science
> project possibilities, the rest of the machine is going to the scrap
> yard.
>
> I gave brief consideration to fitting in a propane burner of some
> sort, lining the drum with fine steel mesh, and making myself one hell
> of a coffee roaster...


From: Dennis on
On Thu, 15 Mar 2007 12:12:08 -0500, WoolyGooly <boogers(a)lots.of.snot>
wrote:

>On Thu, 15 Mar 2007 09:38:35 -0700, Dennis <dgw80(a)hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>>
>>It's been a couple years for me, but when I was shopping, I found that
>>most of the energy-saving emphasis seems to be put on washers, not
>>dryers. A moisture-sensor feature helps some, but the biggest savings
>>comes from having a washer that spins more of the water out of the
>>clothes, shortening drying times.
>
>That's what I'm finding as well. The mixed "demo" load the Sears
>salescreature ran for me in the Oasis (lust lust) consisted of a dozen
>towels, half a dozen pairs of jeans and a set of queen sheets. Not a
>load I'd run myself, but I was pretty impressed with the relative
>dryness of the stuff coming out of the washer. The matching dryer
>finished the load in about 30 minutes, also impressive considering my
>~20yo dryer takes nearly an hour to dry 8 pairs of adult jeans.
>
>I'm having a hard time convincing DH we need to spend $1500 on a w/d
>though...The cost/benefit analysis doesn't predict a payoff for 10+
>years at current energy rates :\

When we were shopping 5 years ago, we found a mid-range Kenmore
(FriGeMore) HE front loader on sale at the local Sears. With the
retailer discounts, a rebate from our electric utility and an
applicable state tax credit, we wound up paying a net US$256 for the
washer. Still works great today. We shopped around and found a
KitchenAid (slightly upscale Whirlpool with a better warranty)
electric dryer with a moisture sensor for around US$300. The
monthly electric bill went down a bit, but I don't remember how much.
So far, so good.

Have you looked into the availability of any rebates or tax credits
for energy saving appliances in your area?

Dennis (evil)
--
My output is down, my income is up, I take a short position on the long bond and
my revenue stream has its own cash flow. -George Carlin
From: Vic Smith on
On Thu, 15 Mar 2007 13:04:22 -0700, Dennis <dgw80(a)hotmail.com> wrote:


>Have you looked into the availability of any rebates or tax credits
>for energy saving appliances in your area?
>
That's a good point. A couple years ago I spent about 5k to replace
my old single pane windows with thermals. Didn't even think to
look for credits when I did my taxes. Don't know if I could have
saved some money, and since it's too late now, I really don't want to
know. But it sure is something to check out.

--Vic

From: The Henchman on

"WoolyGooly" <boogers(a)lots.of.snot> wrote in message
news:rtkiv293gk8utu6a6vdslu7fgjni1resvj(a)4ax.com...
> The washer has died, the repair is more than half the cost of a new
> equivalent-model washer. I'm pitching for a new HE washer as well as
> a new dryer on the theory that a new dryer is probably more
> energy-efficient and will in the long run help reduce the gas bill.
>
> Any recommendations from folks who have been appliance shopping of
> late?

How can an electric dryer get any more efficient? It's just a heating
element and a tumbler....


From: Rick on
The Henchman wrote:
>
> "WoolyGooly" <boogers(a)lots.of.snot> wrote in message
> news:rtkiv293gk8utu6a6vdslu7fgjni1resvj(a)4ax.com...
> > The washer has died, the repair is more than half the cost of a new
> > equivalent-model washer. I'm pitching for a new HE washer as well as
> > a new dryer on the theory that a new dryer is probably more
> > energy-efficient and will in the long run help reduce the gas bill.
> >
> > Any recommendations from folks who have been appliance shopping of
> > late?
>
> How can an electric dryer get any more efficient? It's just a heating
> element and a tumbler....

It could be a whole boatload more efficient if we ever came close to
adopting Euopean efficieny standards. (You know, that place where they
don't feel they have a "right" to low cost fuel and invade countries to
keep it that way...) But that requires a design that involves a lot more
than "just a heating element and a tumbler."

Rick