From: Orak Listalavostok on
On Tue, 10 Aug 2010 22:23:13 -0700, Terra Arcane wrote:
> However, I don't see how you could make these with just a tap or die,
> as they involve a pilot, a relief, and a different lead-in thread angle,
> not just threads. Google ".75-11.5NH tap die" = 0 hits."

http://www.diy-forum.net/re-garden-hose-end-re-thread-die-t120356.html

"As noted, you're probably not going to find a die or tap for a garden
hose thread. The problem is, the male ends aren't cut threads anyway
on anything except perhaps the brass NPT/hose adapters--they're formed.
The female ends are so shallow that you would need a bottom tap and
probably couldn't reach but a portion of the first thread, anyway, even
if you had one."
From: Harold & Susan Vordos on

"Orak Listalavostok" <orak(a)listalavostok.net> wrote in message
news:i3tcac$qs9$1(a)speranza.aioe.org...
> On Tue, 10 Aug 2010 22:23:13 -0700, Terra Arcane wrote:
>> However, I don't see how you could make these with just a tap or die,
>> as they involve a pilot, a relief, and a different lead-in thread angle,
>> not just threads. Google ".75-11.5NH tap die" = 0 hits."
>
> http://www.diy-forum.net/re-garden-hose-end-re-thread-die-t120356.html
snip---

the male ends aren't cut threads anyway
> on anything except perhaps the brass NPT/hose adapters--they're formed.

Not always. There are machined brass ends available---but rarely (if ever)
found on cheap hoses.
I have machined brass ends on many of my hoses (I am a retired machinist---I
know the difference).

Harold



From: woodworker88 on
On Aug 11, 1:03 am, "Harold & Susan Vordos" <vor...(a)tds.net> wrote:

> Not always. There are machined brass ends available---but rarely  (if ever)
> found on cheap hoses.
> I have machined brass ends on many of my hoses (I am a retired machinist---I
> know the difference).
>
> Harold

Machined maybe, but not with a tap. More than likely they're either a
cut on a CNC lathe or thread milled or whirled on a dedicated machine.
From: Kat Rabun on
On Wed, 11 Aug 2010 11:47:35 -0500, DanG wrote:
> Good machined solid brass are available:
> http://www.tamparubber.com/product_pages/coupgard.htm

What most people do to clean up a garden hose is take an old garden hose
with good GHT fittings and slice a sharp channel crosswise across the
threads with a triangular file. This self-tapping channel should be shallow
at the beginning and as deep as you can get it near the bottom.

Then they use this "thread cutter" as a thread chaser on all their garden
hoses. Works both for the male and female ends of your lawn garden hose.

If you can find steel garden hose repair fittings, it works even better
than the sliced brass garden hose fittings to clean up the threads.
From: Ed Huntress on

<mkirsch1(a)rochester.rr.com> wrote in message
news:0883a921-2d15-481f-94b0-f6fb92eb940e(a)j8g2000yqd.googlegroups.com...
On Aug 12, 10:53 am, Kat Rabun <katspianostudio...(a)Use-Author-Supplied-
Address.invalid> wrote:
> What most people do to clean up a garden hose is take an old garden hose
> with good GHT fittings and slice a sharp channel crosswise across the
> threads with a triangular file. This self-tapping channel should be
> shallow
> at the beginning and as deep as you can get it near the bottom.

>No, "most people" certainly do not bother. They will either cut the
>hose and install a repair end, or throw the entire hose away.
>
>The garden hoses I see for sale, even the so-called "good" ones, have
>stamped brass ends. These are not re-threadable, or repairable in any
>way. They must be sliced off and replaced.

Ho-ho! You must be in another newsgroup. Here on RCM, we'd machine a female
die from A1 tool steel, calculate a appropriate load of Red Dot powder and
primer, and re-shape the end with explosive forming. As a bonus, it would
really clean out the inside of that hose.

It couldn't take more than four or five hours of work to save us from having
to buy a $3 replacement end. d8-)

--
Ed Huntress