From: mkirsch1 on
On Aug 12, 10:53 am, Kat Rabun <katspianostudio...(a)Use-Author-Supplied-
Address.invalid> wrote:
> What most people do to clean up a garden hose is take an old garden hose
> with good GHT fittings and slice a sharp channel crosswise across the
> threads with a triangular file. This self-tapping channel should be shallow
> at the beginning and as deep as you can get it near the bottom.

No, "most people" certainly do not bother. They will either cut the
hose and install a repair end, or throw the entire hose away.

The garden hoses I see for sale, even the so-called "good" ones, have
stamped brass ends. These are not re-threadable, or repairable in any
way. They must be sliced off and replaced.
From: dpb on
Ed Huntress wrote:
....
> Ho-ho! You must be in another newsgroup. Here on RCM, we'd machine a female
> die from A1 tool steel, calculate a appropriate load of Red Dot powder and
> primer, and re-shape the end with explosive forming. As a bonus, it would
> really clean out the inside of that hose.
>
> It couldn't take more than four or five hours of work to save us from having
> to buy a $3 replacement end. d8-)

Chuckle... :)

I've done things like re-round them after crushing, certainly, but not
by explosive forming...

--


From: rangerssuck on
On Aug 12, 4:48 pm, dpb <n...(a)non.net> wrote:
> Ed Huntress wrote:
>
> ...
>
> > Ho-ho! You must be in another newsgroup. Here on RCM, we'd machine a female
> > die from A1 tool steel, calculate a appropriate load of Red Dot powder and
> > primer, and re-shape the end with explosive forming. As a bonus, it would
> > really clean out the inside of that hose.
>
> > It couldn't take more than four or five hours of work to save us from having
> > to buy a $3 replacement end. d8-)
>
> Chuckle... :)
>
> I've done things like re-round them after crushing, certainly, but not
> by explosive forming...
>
> --

Or hand write the G-code to CNC a pattern and then cast a new end. But
first you have to build the machinery and the furnace...