From: Gene S. Berkowitz on
In article <g9u42m$u1p$1(a)aioe.org>, none(a)none.net says...
> I'm looking for an LED night light. All I've been able to find so far are
> el cheapo ones that either use a single LED, aren't diffused properly, or
> don't produce enough lumens that my wife will let me get away with using it.
>
> I've tried a number of alternative technologies over the past few years -
> electrolumenscent, compact fluorescent, but she has trouble seeing at night,
> and says none of them make enough light. Right now we're using a 7 watt
> incandescent night light that makes perhaps 40 lumens of light, and she says
> it is barely enough.
>
>
> Therefore, I'm looking for an LED nightlight that is well diffused (not
> directional - I don't want a 'laser' type dot on the ceiling)& which makes
> 80+ lumens of light for our bathroom. I've looked at some at local
> supermarkets and such, but they don't say how many lumens. My experience is
> that if it has a single LED or doesn't mention the lumen output, it just
> won't be bright enough for my wife, who seems to lack the ability to see
> well in low light situations.
>
> I don't care if it uses 2 or 3 watts - I just need a decent amount of
> light output that isn't directional.
>
> I've spent over an hour searching online, and haven't been able to find
> what I need. I find loads and loads of night lights with 20-30 or so lumens
> of output, and which use less than a watt of power. I've tried those
> before, and they just end up in a box in the basement, because my wife says
> they are not up to par.
>
>
> Help!
>

I have a couple of AmerTac(TM) LED nightlights, model # 71381.
They're switchable from blue to green, and I actually find them a little
_too_ bright when I'm dark-adapted. They use 0.3 watts. I got them at
Home Depot.

--Gene
From: Frank on

"OhioGuy" <none(a)none.net> wrote in message news:g9u42m$u1p$1(a)aioe.org...
> I'm looking for an LED night light. All I've been able to find so far
> are el cheapo ones that either use a single LED, aren't diffused properly,
> or don't produce enough lumens that my wife will let me get away with
> using it.
>
> I've tried a number of alternative technologies over the past few years -
> electrolumenscent, compact fluorescent, but she has trouble seeing at
> night, and says none of them make enough light. Right now we're using a 7
> watt incandescent night light that makes perhaps 40 lumens of light, and
> she says it is barely enough.
>
>
> Therefore, I'm looking for an LED nightlight that is well diffused (not
> directional - I don't want a 'laser' type dot on the ceiling)& which makes
> 80+ lumens of light for our bathroom. I've looked at some at local
> supermarkets and such, but they don't say how many lumens. My experience
> is that if it has a single LED or doesn't mention the lumen output, it
> just won't be bright enough for my wife, who seems to lack the ability to
> see well in low light situations.
>
> I don't care if it uses 2 or 3 watts - I just need a decent amount of
> light output that isn't directional.
>
> I've spent over an hour searching online, and haven't been able to find
> what I need. I find loads and loads of night lights with 20-30 or so
> lumens of output, and which use less than a watt of power. I've tried
> those before, and they just end up in a box in the basement, because my
> wife says they are not up to par.
>
>
> Help!
>
>

Standard is 1/2 foot-candle minimum at the floor level. Go to a public
parking lot at night, its 1/2 to 1 foot-candle average, perhaps with hot
spots of 10 foot-candles or so. If she needs much more than that, why not
use motion detectors to light up the whole area. This should give her the
foot-candles as well as the comfort level. Motion detectors are efficient
and may qualify for a government energy tax credit.

BTW those blue LED on DVD players is just too bright and blinding. I put a
tape over the blue LED on my computer speaker. We have a LED night light
that lit up half of the room, rally don't need that much light. We also have
a few stereo components with blue LEDs so that night lights are not
required.



From: Don Klipstein on
In article <g9u42m$u1p$1(a)aioe.org>, OhioGuy wrote:
> I'm looking for an LED night light. All I've been able to find so far are
>el cheapo ones that either use a single LED, aren't diffused properly, or
>don't produce enough lumens that my wife will let me get away with using it.
>
> I've tried a number of alternative technologies over the past few years -
>electrolumenscent, compact fluorescent, but she has trouble seeing at night,
>and says none of them make enough light. Right now we're using a 7 watt
>incandescent night light that makes perhaps 40 lumens of light, and she says
>it is barely enough.
>
> Therefore, I'm looking for an LED nightlight that is well diffused (not
>directional - I don't want a 'laser' type dot on the ceiling)& which makes
>80+ lumens of light for our bathroom. I've looked at some at local
>supermarkets and such, but they don't say how many lumens. My experience is
>that if it has a single LED or doesn't mention the lumen output, it just
>won't be bright enough for my wife, who seems to lack the ability to see
>well in low light situations.
>
> I don't care if it uses 2 or 3 watts - I just need a decent amount of
>light output that isn't directional.
>
> I've spent over an hour searching online, and haven't been able to find
>what I need. I find loads and loads of night lights with 20-30 or so lumens
>of output, and which use less than a watt of power. I've tried those
>before, and they just end up in a box in the basement, because my wife says
>they are not up to par.

They probably have exaggerated claims of light output.

In general, white, non-yellowish-green and blue LEDs have higher
scotopic/photopic ratio than incandescents, especially low wattage ones.
That makes a significant difference where night vision has any role.

Now, for LED lights that truly produce 30 lumens and which should be OK:
Doggone, I am not aware of any that are diffused and not directional.

One can be homebrewed: Luxeon star, 10 ohm resistor at least a watt
(sandstome style 5 and 10 watt ones are cheap and convenient), a
5 volt cellphone charger, and an appropriate diffuser, and a .315 or .5
amp fuse in case something goes wrong.

However, a 3 watt compact fluorescent produces about 100 lumens. Also,
that wattage is usually cold cathode - meaning generally longer life.
Look for a life rating of 20,000 or 25,000 hours or so.

- Don Klipstein (don(a)misty.com)
From: Don Klipstein on
In article <joGdnZXA177nMl_VnZ2dnUVZ_oPinZ2d(a)earthlink.com>, Derald wrote:
>"OhioGuy" <none(a)none.net> wrote:
>
>> ...they just end up in a box in the basement, because my wife says
>>they are not up to par.
> Seriously: Think, "flashlight" ("torch"). DW&I have each owned and
>used bulletproof 2-AA minimag flashlights since the early '80's. They've
>served us well while camping, on cine/photo sets, back stage, _and_ as
>bedside "night" lights. DW often uses hers as a in-bed reading light,
>too. Last week, I installed one of the conversion kits to transform my
>25-year-old minimag into a LED. Truth is, I paid as much for the kit as
>I would have for a new flashlight and I'm not sure that I'm pleased with
>the conversion because I don't perceive it as nearly as bright as the
>(genuine) minimag halide "peanut" lamp (although the color of the light
>may be a factor) and it lacks the wide-to-spot choke that makes the
>minimag so versatile.

I have tried 2-AA and 3-AA LED MAGs. Not conversions, but made as LED
flashlights. I found the 2-AA one a little dim, but I do like the 3-AA
one. And it is adjustable.

I suspect it can be "souped up" by replacing the LED with a Luxeon
K2-with-TFFC, which is a more efficient LED than the one I see in the unit
I bought about a year ago.

- Don Klipstein (don(a)misty.com)
From: John Savage on
"OhioGuy" <none(a)none.net>
> I'm looking for an LED night light. All I've been able to find so far are
>el cheapo ones that either use a single LED, aren't diffused properly, or
>don't produce enough lumens that my wife will let me get away with using it.

It's not clear whether you want light to fall on the floor, or the walls.
In general, I expect this to be dependent on the sightedness or fraility of
the persons navigating the rooms.

A small circle of light is wasted when directed onto a dark floor, but it
can be stretched into a large triangle by directing it downwards along a
white wall. A series of such LEDs will light the way.

Some of the solar garden lights (solar cell, NiCd, single LED) contain a
very clever one-piece optics which converts a narrow vertical beam into
a few hundred radial beams. You might be able to cannibalise these for
their optics. (Cheaper by the dozen.) Then you could add in your own
choice of high lumen LED. As a night light it works well when placed near
floor level against a light-coloured wall.

As far as the "frugal" theme extends, if you were to have the lights
switch on automatically, by an infrared sensor, you might be able to
power them off cells recharged by the garden light solar cells mounted
in a sunny out-of-the-way spot.
--
John Savage (my news address is not valid for email)