From: Owain on
On 4 Nov, 13:56, "john royce" wrote:
> We have been trying to think of a means of supporting one casserole dish on
> top of another one ( the top one usually a smaller diameter ) by means of
> something that will tolerate microwaves and the hotter temperatures using
> the normal oven heating element.  Does such a thing exist anywhere for this
> purpose, or what might be some neat way to solve this problem?   Thanks for
> advice.

Could you make a rack out of chopsticks across the lower casserole?

You could also put the chopsticks across the casserole before putting
the lid on top.

Owain

From: john royce on

"Owain" <spuorgelgoog(a)gowanhill.com> wrote in message
news:d6d72abf-c38a-485c-8a04-9f2337478acb(a)d5g2000yqm.googlegroups.com...
On 4 Nov, 13:56, "john royce" wrote:
> We have been trying to think of a means of supporting one casserole dish
> on
> top of another one ( the top one usually a smaller diameter ) by means of
> something that will tolerate microwaves and the hotter temperatures using
> the normal oven heating element. Does such a thing exist anywhere for this
> purpose, or what might be some neat way to solve this problem? Thanks for
> advice.

Could you make a rack out of chopsticks across the lower casserole?

You could also put the chopsticks across the casserole before putting
the lid on top.
Owain

Thanks to the sensible responses. The glass casserole dishes are so well
made that the lids are too closely fitting even when placed upside down.
Using the oven eating element easily brings the temperature up to where the
wood (chopsticks) cannot cope with it.


From: Melba's Jammin' on
In article <hcs16b$bst$1(a)news.eternal-september.org>,
"john royce" <bluestar(a)mail.invalid> wrote:

> When making casseroles in the microwave combination oven, I try to fill the
> oven right up; so as to be frugal with electricity.

How full are we talking here? You need some space in there for heat
circulation.

> Although some casserole dishes come with lids, I find that these fairly
> close fitting lids usually create a build up of pressure and some of the
> liquid then squirts out, all over the place.

A build-up of pressure? That's a new one to me. Are you sure it's just
not the contents of the casserole bubbling due to the cooking?
>
> To utilise all available oven space it means stacking two casserole dishes
> one on top of the other. Using a normal oven this would be simple to do
> (bearing in mind I'm not using lids) by using a metal rack on the lower one
> to support the upper one.
>
> But when using the combination feature (which I find usefully lessons the
> cooking time) both normal heating and microwave are used "together". So when
> the microwave is on, a metal rack cannot be used.

My microwave came with a metal rack. . . .

> We have been trying to think of a means of supporting one casserole dish on
> top of another one ( the top one usually a smaller diameter ) by means of
> something that will tolerate microwaves and the hotter temperatures using
> the normal oven heating element. Does such a thing exist anywhere for this
> purpose, or what might be some neat way to solve this problem? Thanks for
> advice.

Invert a pie place over the bottom one and don't fill the bottom
casserole so full that it will bubble over. Set your second casserole
on top of the inverted pie plate.

PS: I am not responsible for any burns you may incur, nor any mess, nor
any bad language.

Alternatively, get a pizza stone, the right drill bit, and drill holes
in it � the DIY rack you seek.
--
-Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
http://web.me.com/barbschaller - Who Said Chickens Have Fingers?
10-30-2009
From: Melba's Jammin' on
In article <4af18c41$0$9424$bed64819(a)gradwell.net>,
Pete Verdon <usenet(a)verdonet.organisation.unitedkingdom.invalid>
wrote:

> john royce wrote:
> > When making casseroles in the microwave combination oven, I try to fill the
> > oven right up; so as to be frugal with electricity.
> [snip]
> > We have been trying to think of a means of supporting one casserole dish on
> > top of another one ( the top one usually a smaller diameter ) by means of
> > something that will tolerate microwaves and the hotter temperatures using
> > the normal oven heating element. Does such a thing exist anywhere for this
> > purpose, or what might be some neat way to solve this problem?
>
> If I had to support one pot on top of the other, I'd probably just take
> a couple of chopsticks out of the drawer, lay them across the lower pot,
> and sit the upper pot on top.
>
> Have I missed something?
>
> Pete

Great idea, Pete! Better than mine and I wish I'd thought of it first.
--
-Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
http://web.me.com/barbschaller - Who Said Chickens Have Fingers?
10-30-2009
From: Ian & Hilda Dedic on
john royce wrote:
> "Owain" <spuorgelgoog(a)gowanhill.com> wrote in message
> news:d6d72abf-c38a-485c-8a04-9f2337478acb(a)d5g2000yqm.googlegroups.com...
> On 4 Nov, 13:56, "john royce" wrote:
>> We have been trying to think of a means of supporting one casserole dish
>> on
>> top of another one ( the top one usually a smaller diameter ) by means of
>> something that will tolerate microwaves and the hotter temperatures using
>> the normal oven heating element. Does such a thing exist anywhere for this
>> purpose, or what might be some neat way to solve this problem? Thanks for
>> advice.
>
> Could you make a rack out of chopsticks across the lower casserole?
>
> You could also put the chopsticks across the casserole before putting
> the lid on top.
> Owain
>
> Thanks to the sensible responses. The glass casserole dishes are so well
> made that the lids are too closely fitting even when placed upside down.
> Using the oven eating element easily brings the temperature up to where the
> wood (chopsticks) cannot cope with it.
>
>
what about the bottom of one of those chinese bamboo steamers which are
a grid of bamboo sticks?

These are pretty cheap, or you could use the lid of a microwave streamer
as sold by matalan.

dedics