From: Bill on
"john royce" wrote in message
>
> We have been trying to think of a means of supporting one casserole dish
> on top of another one ( the top one usually a smaller diameter ) by means
> of something that will tolerate microwaves and the hotter temperatures
> using the normal oven heating element. Does such a thing exist anywhere
> for this purpose, or what might be some neat way to solve this problem?
>

It would need to be something which does not conduct electricity - non
metal. Maybe you could find something like a cookie sheet for a regular oven
which is non metal and cut it to size, then support it with glass supports
at each corner. Or maybe a "glass blower" person could design something for
you?

Maybe even "glass rods" made into a rack with supports like a metal rack?

As to saving pennies or fractions thereof, if people would learn to add,
they would know that pennies add up to dollars! That is why my electric bill
will be $28 U.S. this month. Many things I have done to my electric system
which save pennies!


From: Lobster on
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
> In article <hcs16b$bst$1(a)news.eternal-september.org>,
> "john royce" <bluestar(a)mail.invalid> wrote:
>
>> But when using the combination feature (which I find usefully lessons the
>> cooking time) both normal heating and microwave are used "together". So when
>> the microwave is on, a metal rack cannot be used.
>
> My microwave came with a metal rack. . . .

Yeah, not sure what the whole deal is with metal and microwave ovens -
ours also came with two metal racks of different heights intended
(mainly) for combination-cooking of baked potatoes; ie micro first, then
direct heat to brown/crispen them.

I don't know whether the issue is that metal can become
disproportionately hot with microwaves only, thereby maybe melting a
plastic bowl or burning the unwary user?

Then again, the legs of our racks even have little rubber feet! so don't
ask me.

David


From: Michael Black on
On Wed, 4 Nov 2009, Dave C. wrote:

> On Wed, 4 Nov 2009 13:56:19 -0000
> "john royce" <bluestar(a)mail.invalid> wrote:
>
>>
>> When making casseroles in the microwave combination oven, I try to
>> fill the oven right up; so as to be frugal with electricity.
>>
>> Although some casserole dishes come with lids, I find that these
>> fairly close fitting lids usually create a build up of pressure and
>> some of the liquid then squirts out, all over the place.
>>
>> To utilise all available oven space it means stacking two casserole
>> dishes one on top of the other. Using a normal oven this would be
>> simple to do (bearing in mind I'm not using lids) by using a metal
>> rack on the lower one to support the upper one.
>>
>> But when using the combination feature (which I find usefully lessons
>> the cooking time) both normal heating and microwave are used
>> "together". So when the microwave is on, a metal rack cannot be used.
>>
>> We have been trying to think of a means of supporting one casserole
>> dish on top of another one ( the top one usually a smaller diameter )
>> by means of something that will tolerate microwaves and the hotter
>> temperatures using the normal oven heating element. Does such a
>> thing exist anywhere for this purpose, or what might be some neat way
>> to solve this problem? Thanks for advice.
>>
>
> Let's get this straight... you are trying to think of a creative way to
> save about .0000000000002 pennies worth of electricity? C'mon, be
> serious now... is this a troll? -Dave
>
No, problem solving can be cheap.

But in the original question, there is the assumption that filling the
microwave saves money. I'm not so sure, since the more you put in, the
longer it takes to heat up, and hence electricity use increases. The
advantage of smaller portions at a time is that you can better control how
it cooks, and it's certainly easier to open the door, take the lid off one
package and stir (when stirring is needed) than to deal with a full oven.

So in order for the need for some sort of rack, one first has to see if
there really is a savings from filling up that microwave, or is it
basically the same electricity useage cooking things separately.

Michael

From: Andy Cap on
On Wed, 4 Nov 2009 06:32:26 -0800, "Bill" <billnomailnospamx(a)yahoo.com> wrote:

>As to saving pennies or fractions thereof, if people would learn to add,
>they would know that pennies add up to dollars! That is why my electric bill
>will be $28 U.S. this month. Many things I have done to my electric system
>which save pennies!

And a KW costs what exactly ?

Andy C
From: sf on
On Wed, 4 Nov 2009 10:13:30 +0800, "Dave C." <noway(a)nohow.never>
wrote:

>Let's get this straight... you are trying to think of a creative way to
>save about .0000000000002 pennies worth of electricity? C'mon, be
>serious now... is this a troll? -Dave

These nut cases appear every so often. To store all of those
casseroles, he needs a large freezer... when the freezer is empty,
he's wasting electricity. It's a cycle he hasn't give much thought
to. Being frugal doesn't mean being cheap, it just means don't waste.
However, he's taking the concept to the point of being a cheapskate.
I wonder if he reuses toilet paper?

--
I love cooking with wine.
Sometimes I even put it in the food.