From: NT on
On Nov 4, 1:56 pm, "john royce" <blues...(a)mail.invalid> wrote:
> When making casseroles in the microwave combination oven, I try to fill the
> oven right up;  so as to be frugal with electricity.
>
> Although some casserole dishes come with lids, I find that these fairly
> close fitting lids usually create a build up of pressure and some of the
> liquid then squirts out, all over the place.
>
> To utilise all available oven space it means stacking two casserole dishes
> one on top of the other.  Using a normal oven this would be simple to do
> (bearing in mind I'm not using lids)  by using a metal rack on the lower one
> to support the upper one.
>
> But when using the combination feature (which I find usefully lessons the
> cooking time) both normal heating and microwave are used "together". So when
> the microwave is on,  a metal rack cannot be used.
>
> We have been trying to think of a means of supporting one casserole dish on
> top of another one ( the top one usually a smaller diameter ) by means of
> something that will tolerate microwaves and the hotter temperatures using
> the normal oven heating element.  Does such a thing exist anywhere for this
> purpose, or what might be some neat way to solve this problem?   Thanks for
> advice.


Save far more money by tweaking recipes so very little of the
ingredietns even need heating, let alone cooking. Saves lots of time
too.


NT
From: Robert on

"john royce" <bluestar(a)mail.invalid> wrote in message
news:hcs16b$bst$1(a)news.eternal-september.org...
>
> When making casseroles in the microwave combination oven, I try to fill
> the oven right up; so as to be frugal with electricity.
>
> Although some casserole dishes come with lids, I find that these fairly
> close fitting lids usually create a build up of pressure and some of the
> liquid then squirts out, all over the place.
>
> To utilise all available oven space it means stacking two casserole dishes
> one on top of the other. Using a normal oven this would be simple to do
> (bearing in mind I'm not using lids) by using a metal rack on the lower
> one
> to support the upper one.
>
> But when using the combination feature (which I find usefully lessons the
> cooking time) both normal heating and microwave are used "together". So
> when the microwave is on, a metal rack cannot be used.
>
> We have been trying to think of a means of supporting one casserole dish
> on top of another one ( the top one usually a smaller diameter ) by means
> of something that will tolerate microwaves and the hotter temperatures
> using the normal oven heating element. Does such a thing exist anywhere
> for this purpose, or what might be some neat way to solve this problem?
> Thanks for advice.
>
>
>

Wooden sticks might have to soak in water?

Robert


From: Lou on

"Bob F" <bobnospam(a)gmail.com> wrote in message
news:hcsd5a$qua$1(a)news.eternal-september.org...

> Go to a cheapo tile shop, or even hardware store, and get appropriate size
> large ceramic floor tiles to separate/stack the dishes.

This is **food** we're talking about here - whatever you use, if it has a
chance of coming into contact with food, should be food grade.


From: Steve Walker on
On Wed, 04 Nov 2009 14:30:58 +0000, Ian & Hilda Dedic wrote:

> john royce wrote:
>> "Owain" <spuorgelgoog(a)gowanhill.com> wrote in message
>> news:d6d72abf-c38a-485c-8a04-9f2337478acb(a)d5g2000yqm.googlegroups.com...
>> On 4 Nov, 13:56, "john royce" wrote:
>>> We have been trying to think of a means of supporting one casserole dish
>>> on
>>> top of another one ( the top one usually a smaller diameter ) by means of
>>> something that will tolerate microwaves and the hotter temperatures using
>>> the normal oven heating element. Does such a thing exist anywhere for this
>>> purpose, or what might be some neat way to solve this problem? Thanks for
>>> advice.
>>
>> Could you make a rack out of chopsticks across the lower casserole?
>>
>> You could also put the chopsticks across the casserole before putting
>> the lid on top.
>> Owain
>>
>> Thanks to the sensible responses. The glass casserole dishes are so well
>> made that the lids are too closely fitting even when placed upside down.
>> Using the oven eating element easily brings the temperature up to where the
>> wood (chopsticks) cannot cope with it.
>>
>>
> what about the bottom of one of those chinese bamboo steamers which are
> a grid of bamboo sticks?
>
> These are pretty cheap, or you could use the lid of a microwave streamer
> as sold by matalan.
>
> dedics

You should actually be able to use metal skewers instead of chopsticks. As
long as the gap between them both and between them and the metal walls is
large enough, they will not spark and will have little effect on heating.

Oddly enough, our first microwave (a Tricity combination oven fifteen years
ago) had a metal rack and specifically mentioned that it was okay to use it
for combination cooking - I can only think that thanks to the glass
turntable, it was held far enough away from the metal casing.

SteveW
From: Steve Walker on
On Wed, 04 Nov 2009 14:41:33 +0000, Lobster wrote:

> Melba's Jammin' wrote:
>> In article <hcs16b$bst$1(a)news.eternal-september.org>,
>> "john royce" <bluestar(a)mail.invalid> wrote:
>>
>>> But when using the combination feature (which I find usefully lessons the
>>> cooking time) both normal heating and microwave are used "together". So when
>>> the microwave is on, a metal rack cannot be used.
>>
>> My microwave came with a metal rack. . . .
>
> Yeah, not sure what the whole deal is with metal and microwave ovens -
> ours also came with two metal racks of different heights intended
> (mainly) for combination-cooking of baked potatoes; ie micro first, then
> direct heat to brown/crispen them.
>
> I don't know whether the issue is that metal can become
> disproportionately hot with microwaves only, thereby maybe melting a
> plastic bowl or burning the unwary user?
>
> Then again, the legs of our racks even have little rubber feet! so don't
> ask me.
>
> David

The metal racks do not become hot from the microwaves, but in early
microwaves that didn't use turntables or steer the microwaves, all the
microwaves would come from one direction and bounce around until absorbed
and the metal racks could shield the food preventing it cooking properly.
Also if any metal in the microwave comes close enough to any other metal,
the gap between them will spark madly.

SteveW