From: Grimly Curmudgeon on
We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the
drugs began to take hold. I remember "john royce"
<bluestar(a)mail.invalid> saying something like:

>We have been trying to think of a means of supporting one casserole dish on
>top of another one ( the top one usually a smaller diameter ) by means of
>something that will tolerate microwaves and the hotter temperatures using
>the normal oven heating element. Does such a thing exist anywhere for this
>purpose, or what might be some neat way to solve this problem? Thanks for
>advice.

Pyrex casserole dish lid, turned upside down, is just the thing.
From: Al on
On Nov 4, 8:56 am, "john royce" <blues...(a)mail.invalid> wrote:
> When making casseroles in the microwave combination oven, I try to fill the
> oven right up; so as to be frugal with electricity.
>
> Although some casserole dishes come with lids, I find that these fairly
> close fitting lids usually create a build up of pressure and some of the
> liquid then squirts out, all over the place.
>
> To utilise all available oven space it means stacking two casserole dishes
> one on top of the other. Using a normal oven this would be simple to do
> (bearing in mind I'm not using lids) by using a metal rack on the lower one
> to support the upper one.
>
> But when using the combination feature (which I find usefully lessons the
> cooking time) both normal heating and microwave are used "together". So when
> the microwave is on, a metal rack cannot be used.
>
> We have been trying to think of a means of supporting one casserole dish on
> top of another one ( the top one usually a smaller diameter ) by means of
> something that will tolerate microwaves and the hotter temperatures using
> the normal oven heating element. Does such a thing exist anywhere for this
> purpose, or what might be some neat way to solve this problem? Thanks for
> advice.

You will save exactly nothing.
The MW puts out so many BTUs and that is absorbed by the food. Two
cups of water will take twice as long to boil because it takes twice
as many BTUs to raise the temperature the the boiling point. The same
principle applies to your plan to put piles of food in the oven. Two
equal piles will take twice as long to cook and it won't cook as
evenly either when the food is crowded together.
Time to rethink your cunning plan. I use two different microwaves on
two different circuits.
From: Rod on
Al wrote:
<>
> You will save exactly nothing.
> The MW puts out so many BTUs and that is absorbed by the food. Two
> cups of water will take twice as long to boil because it takes twice
> as many BTUs to raise the temperature the the boiling point. The same
> principle applies to your plan to put piles of food in the oven. Two
> equal piles will take twice as long to cook and it won't cook as
> evenly either when the food is crowded together.
> Time to rethink your cunning plan. I use two different microwaves on
> two different circuits.

Agreed. But the OP later wrote:

"Using the oven eating element easily brings the temperature up to where
the wood (chopsticks) cannot cope with it."

Which seems to question just what the OP is doing. Using microwave
heating, using element heating, or both?

And if he really wants to minimise electricity usage perhaps a hay box
would help?

--
Rod
From: Al on
On Nov 4, 5:32 pm, Rod <polygo...(a)ntlworld.com> wrote:
> Al wrote:
>
> <>
>
> > You will save exactly nothing.
> > The MW puts out so many BTUs and that is absorbed by the food. Two
> > cups of water will take twice as long to boil because it takes twice
> > as many BTUs to raise the temperature the the boiling point. The same
> > principle applies to your plan to put piles of food in the oven. Two
> > equal piles will take twice as long to cook and it won't cook as
> > evenly either when the food is crowded together.
> > Time to rethink your cunning plan. I use two different microwaves on
> > two different circuits.
>
> Agreed. But the OP later wrote:
>
> "Using the oven eating element easily brings the temperature up to where
> the wood (chopsticks) cannot cope with it."
>
> Which seems to question just what the OP is doing. Using microwave
> heating, using element heating, or both?
>
> And if he really wants to minimise electricity usage perhaps a hay box
> would help?
>
> --
> Rod

He could save electricity by cutting vent holes in the top and using
all those sticks for kindling under the food. In other words, use the
oven like a hibachi. There's plenty of sticks lying about in this
season. Do this outside though for safety reasons. Also, this may
void the warranty on your microwave.
From: john royce on

"sf" <sf(a)geemail.com> wrote in message
news:n593f51amvd0a9p2olmv3b9msub24nsej8(a)4ax.com...
> On Wed, 4 Nov 2009 10:13:30 +0800, "Dave C." <noway(a)nohow.never>
> wrote:
>
>>Let's get this straight... you are trying to think of a creative way to
>>save about .0000000000002 pennies worth of electricity? C'mon, be
>>serious now... is this a troll? -Dave
>
> These nut cases appear every so often. To store all of those
> casseroles, he needs a large freezer... when the freezer is empty,
> he's wasting electricity. It's a cycle he hasn't give much thought
> to. Being frugal doesn't mean being cheap, it just means don't waste.
> However, he's taking the concept to the point of being a cheapskate.
> I wonder if he reuses toilet paper?

Some people are so *opinionated* dont you think? The original question was
not 'just' about saving money, (which if you are not a merkin, might
actually have consequences) sometimes its just more convenient to cook as
much as a microwave will take; which often is not all that much anyway.

Our cooking rarely if ever gets frozen, so why introduce to others such
aspects as this that your over active mind uneccesarily produces? You
readily call someone else a nutcase for asking a valid food related
question, but empty vessals make the most noise, and you certainly qualify
wouldn't you say? Its always a big problem in (therapy) groups that the
shallow and opionated want to *hog* everything. when two or more empty
vessals start talking to each other they succeed and then spoil the
newsgroup for others. Why dont you look at yourself?