From: john royce on

"Al" <albundy2(a)mailinator.com> wrote in message
news:ca94cb91-c5de-46e5-ac70-228b9992f08a(a)u13g2000vbb.googlegroups.com...
> On Nov 4, 5:32 pm, Rod <polygo...(a)ntlworld.com> wrote:
>> Al wrote:
>>
>> <>
>>
>> > You will save exactly nothing.
>> > The MW puts out so many BTUs and that is absorbed by the food. Two
>> > cups of water will take twice as long to boil because it takes twice
>> > as many BTUs to raise the temperature the the boiling point. The same
>> > principle applies to your plan to put piles of food in the oven. Two
>> > equal piles will take twice as long to cook and it won't cook as
>> > evenly either when the food is crowded together.
>> > Time to rethink your cunning plan. I use two different microwaves on
>> > two different circuits.
>>
>> Agreed. But the OP later wrote:
>>
>> "Using the oven eating element easily brings the temperature up to where
>> the wood (chopsticks) cannot cope with it."
>>
>> Which seems to question just what the OP is doing. Using microwave
>> heating, using element heating, or both?
>>
>> And if he really wants to minimise electricity usage perhaps a hay box
>> would help?
>> Rod

Thanks to all (except the couple of empty vessals who waste everyones time).
To answer some general points: this oven uses both microwave and heating
element both at the same time. Our instruction manual specifically say not
to use any metal. Once I put in a plate that had a gold glazed rim and it
started sparking like crazy. Its not just about economy, the microwave is
not so big; so to fill it up is more convenient. Upturned lids are so close
fitting that pressure builds up and liquid squirts out, so thats a no go.

Grateful especially for the information about the ignition temperatures of
wood. Mistakely I assumed that the higher temperatures produced by the
heating element would cause the wood to catch fire. This information has
now solved this issue since I can easily make something out of some strips
of hardwood. Thanks.


From: Lou on

"john royce" <bluestar(a)mail.invalid> wrote in message
news:hcuesk$gbv$1(a)news.eternal-september.org...
>
(snipped)
> Grateful especially for the information about the ignition temperatures of
> wood. Mistakely I assumed that the higher temperatures produced by the
> heating element would cause the wood to catch fire. This information has
> now solved this issue since I can easily make something out of some strips
> of hardwood. Thanks.

Just a note of (possibly excessive) caution here. Back in the 1970's energy
crisis, a lot of people tried home heating with wood burning stoves. At the
time, I read that the ignition temperature of wood can be drastically
lowered by long-term exposure to elevated temperatures - in extreme cases,
ignition temperature can be lower than the boiling point of water.

The article was in connection with placing a wood-burner an adequate
distance from walls and furniture for safety. I don't know how accurate
that information is, but if your wood rack will be exposed to elevated oven
temperatures over a period of years, this may apply to you as well.


From: sf on
On Thu, 5 Nov 2009 11:39:21 -0000, "john royce"
<bluestar(a)mail.invalid> wrote:

>Some people are so *opinionated* dont you think? The original question was
>not 'just' about saving money, (which if you are not a merkin, might
>actually have consequences) sometimes its just more convenient to cook as
>much as a microwave will take; which often is not all that much anyway.

John, your message was lost after "merkin". Lose that word and you'll
be listened to more closely.

--
I love cooking with wine.
Sometimes I even put it in the food.
From: Goomba on
john royce wrote:

> Some people are so *opinionated* dont you think? The original question was
> not 'just' about saving money, (which if you are not a merkin, might
> actually have consequences) sometimes its just more convenient to cook as
> much as a microwave will take; which often is not all that much anyway.
>
> Our cooking rarely if ever gets frozen, so why introduce to others such
> aspects as this that your over active mind uneccesarily produces? You
> readily call someone else a nutcase for asking a valid food related
> question, but empty vessals make the most noise, and you certainly qualify
> wouldn't you say? Its always a big problem in (therapy) groups that the
> shallow and opionated want to *hog* everything. when two or more empty
> vessals start talking to each other they succeed and then spoil the
> newsgroup for others. Why dont you look at yourself?
>

oh you're gonna fit right in with AmandaF/Mandy Ruby. You both sound
like twits.
From: "Malcom "Mal" Reynolds" on
In article
<hcudhj$60a$1(a)news.eternal-september.org
>,
"john royce" <bluestar(a)mail.invalid>
wrote:

> "sf" <sf(a)geemail.com> wrote in message
> news:n593f51amvd0a9p2olmv3b9msub24nsej8(a)4ax.com...
> > On Wed, 4 Nov 2009 10:13:30 +0800, "Dave C." <noway(a)nohow.never>
> > wrote:
> >
> >>Let's get this straight... you are trying to think of a creative way to
> >>save about .0000000000002 pennies worth of electricity? C'mon, be
> >>serious now... is this a troll? -Dave
> >
> > These nut cases appear every so often. To store all of those
> > casseroles, he needs a large freezer... when the freezer is empty,
> > he's wasting electricity. It's a cycle he hasn't give much thought
> > to. Being frugal doesn't mean being cheap, it just means don't waste.
> > However, he's taking the concept to the point of being a cheapskate.
> > I wonder if he reuses toilet paper?
>
> Some people are so *opinionated* dont you think? The original question was
> not 'just' about saving money, (which if you are not a merkin, might
> actually have consequences) sometimes its just more convenient to cook as
> much as a microwave will take; which often is not all that much anyway.
>
> Our cooking rarely if ever gets frozen, so why introduce to others such
> aspects as this that your over active mind uneccesarily produces? You
> readily call someone else a nutcase for asking a valid food related
> question, but empty vessals make the most noise, and you certainly qualify
> wouldn't you say? Its always a big problem in (therapy) groups that the
> shallow and opionated want to *hog* everything. when two or more empty
> vessals start talking to each other they succeed and then spoil the
> newsgroup for others. Why dont you look at yourself?

I'd suggest you ask your question in

rec.food.cooking
rec.food.equipment

or if it's that important, try to find a
bigger microwave/combo unit

or why aren't you just using a
regular/convection unit

(btw I actually don't have a full sized
one but use a counter-top
convection/toaster unit for lots of my
meals. I also have an advantium
microwave/convection oven but I don't
really like it and am hoping to switch
it out for a full sized convection oven)