From: spendwize.com on
Piling one dish upon another is going to alter the way the mocrowave heats
both dishes! The waves are going through double densities. So whatever you
think you are saving, you are probably spending in needing to heat longer.
If you want to cover a dish withour the top "exploding" just don't civer
it tightly; leave a little open space for the steam to escape.
xxxxo
-------------------------------------
john royce wrote:





> When making casseroles in the microwave combination oven, I try to fill
> the
> oven right up; so as to be frugal with electricity.

> Although some casserole dishes come with lids, I find that these fairly
> close fitting lids usually create a build up of pressure and some of
> the
> liquid then squirts out, all over the place.

> To utilise all available oven space it means stacking two casserole
> dishes
> one on top of the other. Using a normal oven this would be simple to
> do
> (bearing in mind I'm not using lids) by using a metal rack on the
> lower one
> to support the upper one.

> But when using the combination feature (which I find usefully lessons
> the
> cooking time) both normal heating and microwave are used
> "together". So when
> the microwave is on, a metal rack cannot be used.

> We have been trying to think of a means of supporting one casserole
> dish on
> top of another one ( the top one usually a smaller diameter ) by means
> of
> something that will tolerate microwaves and the hotter temperatures
> using
> the normal oven heating element. Does such a thing exist anywhere for
> this
> purpose, or what might be some neat way to solve this problem? Thanks
> for
> advice.








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From: Bob F on
Lou wrote:
> "Bob F" <bobnospam(a)gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:hcsd5a$qua$1(a)news.eternal-september.org...
>
>> Go to a cheapo tile shop, or even hardware store, and get
>> appropriate size large ceramic floor tiles to separate/stack the
>> dishes.
>
> This is **food** we're talking about here - whatever you use, if it
> has a chance of coming into contact with food, should be food grade.

Ceramic tile is used all the time for kitchen counters.

And it's just separating the dishes. Probably not even touching the food.


From: Rod Speed on
Bob F wrote:
> Lou wrote:
>> "Bob F" <bobnospam(a)gmail.com> wrote in message
>> news:hcsd5a$qua$1(a)news.eternal-september.org...
>>
>>> Go to a cheapo tile shop, or even hardware store, and get
>>> appropriate size large ceramic floor tiles to separate/stack the
>>> dishes.
>>
>> This is **food** we're talking about here - whatever you use, if it
>> has a chance of coming into contact with food, should be food grade.
>
> Ceramic tile is used all the time for kitchen counters.
>
> And it's just separating the dishes. Probably not even touching the food.

Makes more sense to use ceramic plates etc instead of tiles.

I use those Corelle plates for that, works fine in both a combo oven and pure oven of either type.


From: Al on
On Nov 5, 3:47 pm, info_at_1-script_dot_...(a)foo.com (spendwize.com)
wrote:
> Piling one dish upon another is going to alter the way the mocrowave heats
> both dishes! The waves are going through double densities. So whatever you
> think you are saving, you are probably spending in needing to heat longer.
> If you want to cover a dish withour the top "exploding" just don't civer
> it tightly; leave a little open space for the steam to escape.
> xxxxo

Please don't bother the OP with technical facts about how microwaves
work. HE/she would rather experiment with putting wood and other
objects into a device designed to cook food in certain reasonable
portions. I hope it works out for the OP. I would add in passing that
some of the off-gassing from putting objects not designed for
microwave cooking into such ovens can cause health problems, but what
the hell!
From: Al on
On Nov 5, 7:02 am, "john royce" <blues...(a)mail.invalid> wrote:
> "Al" <albun...(a)mailinator.com> wrote in message
>
> news:ca94cb91-c5de-46e5-ac70-228b9992f08a(a)u13g2000vbb.googlegroups.com...
>
>
>
> > On Nov 4, 5:32 pm, Rod <polygo...(a)ntlworld.com> wrote:
> >> Al wrote:
>
> >> <>
>
> >> > You will save exactly nothing.
> >> > The MW puts out so many BTUs and that is absorbed by the food. Two
> >> > cups of water will take twice as long to boil because it takes twice
> >> > as many BTUs to raise the temperature the the boiling point. The same
> >> > principle applies to your plan to put piles of food in the oven. Two
> >> > equal piles will take twice as long to cook and it won't cook as
> >> > evenly either when the food is crowded together.
> >> > Time to rethink your cunning plan. I use two different microwaves on
> >> > two different circuits.
>
> >> Agreed. But the OP later wrote:
>
> >> "Using the oven eating element easily brings the temperature up to where
> >> the wood (chopsticks) cannot cope with it."
>
> >> Which seems to question just what the OP is doing. Using microwave
> >> heating, using element heating, or both?
>
> >> And if he really wants to minimise electricity usage perhaps a hay box
> >> would help?
> >> Rod
>
> Thanks to all (except the couple of empty vessals who waste everyones time).
> To answer some general points: this oven uses both microwave and heating
> element both at the same time. Our instruction manual specifically say not
> to use any metal. Once I put in a plate that had a gold glazed rim and it
> started sparking like crazy. Its not just about economy, the microwave is
> not so big; so to fill it up is more convenient. Upturned lids are so close
> fitting that pressure builds up and liquid squirts out, so thats a no go.
>
I solved that lid problem by drilling 1/8" holes in the lids in
various places. Liquids can't squirt out unless the container is
either over filled and/or over heated. If you start boiling
everything, it has to go somewhere. Be prepared to replace your
equipment more often too as the cooking methods you favor are more
taxing to the electronics. Heat is one of the main killers of
electronic parts. Your oven is staying hotter longer and is not able
to dispense with the heat. One of the first things that goes with
microwaves subjected to this is the overheat sensor/s. These are mere
$30 parts, but take an expensive service call or bench charge to
replace. I'd do it for you for about $100. And that's the cheapest
thing that can happen.