From: john royce on

When making casseroles in the microwave combination oven, I try to fill the
oven right up; so as to be frugal with electricity.

Although some casserole dishes come with lids, I find that these fairly
close fitting lids usually create a build up of pressure and some of the
liquid then squirts out, all over the place.

To utilise all available oven space it means stacking two casserole dishes
one on top of the other. Using a normal oven this would be simple to do
(bearing in mind I'm not using lids) by using a metal rack on the lower one
to support the upper one.

But when using the combination feature (which I find usefully lessons the
cooking time) both normal heating and microwave are used "together". So when
the microwave is on, a metal rack cannot be used.

We have been trying to think of a means of supporting one casserole dish on
top of another one ( the top one usually a smaller diameter ) by means of
something that will tolerate microwaves and the hotter temperatures using
the normal oven heating element. Does such a thing exist anywhere for this
purpose, or what might be some neat way to solve this problem? Thanks for
advice.



From: Dave C. on
On Wed, 4 Nov 2009 13:56:19 -0000
"john royce" <bluestar(a)mail.invalid> wrote:

>
> When making casseroles in the microwave combination oven, I try to
> fill the oven right up; so as to be frugal with electricity.
>
> Although some casserole dishes come with lids, I find that these
> fairly close fitting lids usually create a build up of pressure and
> some of the liquid then squirts out, all over the place.
>
> To utilise all available oven space it means stacking two casserole
> dishes one on top of the other. Using a normal oven this would be
> simple to do (bearing in mind I'm not using lids) by using a metal
> rack on the lower one to support the upper one.
>
> But when using the combination feature (which I find usefully lessons
> the cooking time) both normal heating and microwave are used
> "together". So when the microwave is on, a metal rack cannot be used.
>
> We have been trying to think of a means of supporting one casserole
> dish on top of another one ( the top one usually a smaller diameter )
> by means of something that will tolerate microwaves and the hotter
> temperatures using the normal oven heating element. Does such a
> thing exist anywhere for this purpose, or what might be some neat way
> to solve this problem? Thanks for advice.
>

Let's get this straight... you are trying to think of a creative way to
save about .0000000000002 pennies worth of electricity? C'mon, be
serious now... is this a troll? -Dave
From: Ophelia on
john royce wrote:
> When making casseroles in the microwave combination oven, I try to
> fill the oven right up; so as to be frugal with electricity.
>
> Although some casserole dishes come with lids, I find that these
> fairly close fitting lids usually create a build up of pressure and
> some of the liquid then squirts out, all over the place.
>
> To utilise all available oven space it means stacking two casserole
> dishes one on top of the other. Using a normal oven this would be
> simple to do (bearing in mind I'm not using lids) by using a metal
> rack on the lower one to support the upper one.
>
> But when using the combination feature (which I find usefully lessons
> the cooking time) both normal heating and microwave are used
> "together". So when the microwave is on, a metal rack cannot be used.
>
> We have been trying to think of a means of supporting one casserole
> dish on top of another one ( the top one usually a smaller diameter )
> by means of something that will tolerate microwaves and the hotter
> temperatures using the normal oven heating element. Does such a
> thing exist anywhere for this purpose, or what might be some neat way
> to solve this problem? Thanks for advice.

Would it be possible to use the casserole lid but upside down, so that it
doesn't create the seal? Stand the top dish on the lid. Hopefully it would
give more stability that something flat.


From: Goomba on
john royce wrote:
> When making casseroles in the microwave combination oven, I try to fill the
> oven right up; so as to be frugal with electricity.
>
I can't muster up much concern over a penny worth of electricity for a
microwave. I just don't use it that way. How long do you have it running
that you feel you need to pack it full to make it most cost effective?
Does the quality of cooking suffer from being packed full?
From: Pete Verdon on
john royce wrote:
> When making casseroles in the microwave combination oven, I try to fill the
> oven right up; so as to be frugal with electricity.
[snip]
> We have been trying to think of a means of supporting one casserole dish on
> top of another one ( the top one usually a smaller diameter ) by means of
> something that will tolerate microwaves and the hotter temperatures using
> the normal oven heating element. Does such a thing exist anywhere for this
> purpose, or what might be some neat way to solve this problem?

If I had to support one pot on top of the other, I'd probably just take
a couple of chopsticks out of the drawer, lay them across the lower pot,
and sit the upper pot on top.

Have I missed something?

Pete