From: BluePlanet on
"Mike" <turnpike_user(a)turnpike_REMOVEuser.THIScomANDTHIS> wrote in message
news:2c03MpIMRqhHFwou(a)turnpike.home...
>
> So why the f*** are you bothering to read a thread marked OT and wasting
> your own time replying

He's just a troll, and impressively, one of the less intelligent ones.


From: BluePlanet on

"Colin Wilson" <REMOVEEVERYTHINGBUTnewsgroup(a)phoenixbbsZEROSPAM.co.uk> wrote
in message news:MPG.21f0aaf833000ccc98a509(a)news.individual.net...
>> You may indeed have been scammed. Some malware intercepts requests
>> addressed to interesting Web sites, such as eBay and online banks, and
>> redirects the requests to a Web server operated by the fraudster.
>
> My thinking as well - might be worth the OP contacting his bank too -
> it might be a case of a "poisoned DNS" redirecting him to what to all
> intents and purposes is the "right" site as far as the OP can tell,
> but actually sent him to a scam site despite entering the correct web
> address.
>
> http://www.theregister.co.uk/2007/12/11/dns_liar_attack/

Maybe watch the bank statements as you should be doing anyway, but I
wouldn't really be too concerned. Several other posters have confirmed this
is normal procedure, and if the DNS had been poisoned, it's likely the OP
would have noticed/been alerted to an invalid SSL certificate, since it was
https.


From: Angus Rodgers on
On Thu, 10 Jan 2008 23:38:13 -0000, "BluePlanet"
<me(a)privacy.net> wrote:

>Maybe watch the bank statements as you should be doing anyway, but I
>wouldn't really be too concerned. Several other posters have confirmed this
>is normal procedure, and if the DNS had been poisoned, it's likely the OP
>would have noticed/been alerted to an invalid SSL certificate, since it was
>https.

I imagine (and hope!) you're right, but I'll phone the credit card
people tomorrow anyway, just in case, and I'll also take the advice
another poster gave not to do any Internet banking for a while until
I'm satisfied that there's no spyware involved.

Rather than telephone eBay, I've e-mailed their Customer Support
people, with essentially the same message I posted here (leaving
out only the bit about "incompetence"!).
--
Angus Rodgers
(twirlip@ eats spam; reply to angusrod@)
Contains mild peril
From: Colin Wilson on
> I imagine (and hope!) you're right, but I'll phone the credit card
> people tomorrow anyway, just in case, and I'll also take the advice
> another poster gave not to do any Internet banking for a while until
> I'm satisfied that there's no spyware involved.

If you're stuck and really need to do a little online banking, can I
suggest a live linux boot CD as being a way of avoiding 'doze
altogether.

Unless the official distribution has been hacked, you're simply
working off a static disc image - nothing is saved on the system,
hence no spyware can squirm in.
From: Lin Chung on
Angus Rodgers wrote:
> Having just moved to a new ISP today, I tried to change the e-mail
> address with which I am registered at eBay. I had to try three
> times. The first two times, I was told to enter my credit card
> details, including the three-digit security code. On reflection,
> I don't think I have ever provided eBay with credit card details
> before (having only bought, never sold); but I didn't suspect
> anything amiss (except the second time, and even then I thought
> it was only some technical glitch).
> The promised e-mail to my new address didn't arrive (even after a
> couple of hours), so I tried a third time. This time I wasn't asked
> for any credit card details, and a web page appeared, saying that a
> message had been sent to my new e-mail address - which indeed it had.
> I confirmed the change; and my personal details have been updated.
> But there is no sign of any credit card information being recorded.
> On the first two attempts, instead of a web page telling me clearly
> that a confirmation request had been sent to my new e-mail address,
> there was a different, very poorly-designed web page, which just said
> at the top, neither prominently nor precisely, "Check e-mail", and a
> much more prominent sign-in box, whose attached text said something
> like, "Credit card details are required for this change of e-mail
> address". On both occasions, I complied. This part of the process
> looked professional enough, e.g., there was one of those images of
> decimal digits, which can only be read by human eyes, which I had to
> read and then type in as a security check. There was also a warning
> to make sure that the displayed web address began with something like
> https://ebay.co.uk - which it did.
> I am beginning to be worried that I have been scammed, in some way....



This report today is highly relevant.
"Warning on stealthy Windows virus"
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/7183008.stm

The tool mentioned in the article is here:
"GMER 1.0.13"
http://www.download.com/GMER/3000-8022_4-10720106.html

The comment in one of the reviews is right: it should be improved. It
doesn't give you warning of the presence of the virus but just quietly
proceeds to remove it, if there is one.

--
Lin Chung.
[Paste ntlworld over the Water Margin to send a private e-mail.]