From: s on
On May 4, 12:40 pm, w_tom <w_t...(a)usa.net> wrote:
> On May 4, 9:37 am, s <s...(a)mailinator.com> wrote:
>
> > One question I had was will using a surgeprotectorimpact the bills?
> > And does leaving the surgeprotectorin the socket
> > turned off consume power? I don't have it which is careless of me but
> > was planning to get it but now am hesitant due
> > to my high bills. I understand for equipments like laptop that is
> > highly required.
>
> Surge protector is a switch. It is not something magical. It is a
> switch that remains open - conducts no electricity - except when a
> massive surge current arrives. When the switch closes, then that
> current is diverted. If the switch is connected single digit feet to
> earth ground, then current is diverted to the protection. Protector
> is not protection. Earth ground is the protection.

Thanks for the reply. I was thinking a surge protector is also like
other items mentioned
in this thread which consume power if plugged into a socket even when
they are off(laptop,cable modem).
I was under the impression that if a surge protector is plugged into
the wall socket even when it
is off it would be consuming some power. Or devices(laptop,modem)
connected to a surge protector
could be consuming power even if the main switch for surge protector
is off.


> How to be frugal. One 'whole house' protector for everything in the
> house. Dishwasher, microwave oven, and clock radio require
> protection. And far more critical than a laptop is protecting smoke
> detector, kitchen and bathroom GFCI, and furnace controls. IOW one
> 'whole house' protector for about $1 per protected appliance. Or the
> plug-in protector that does not have the earthing connection, does not
> claim to protect a laptop from the other and typically destructive
> surge, and cost maybe $25 or $100 per appliance.

I saw one at my friend's place a while ago. When plugged into the wall
socket
it had a glow in the protecting bulb indicating it was protecting
appliances connected to it
but there was no light in the grounded bulb. So, perhaps it was not
grounded to earth from the socket
to which the protector was connected. Is such a protector safe?

> Surge protectors don't consume electricity. That 'switch' closes
> only for microseconds maybe once every many years. But cost of and
> if it does anything is more important. A protector too close to a
> laptop may even earth a surge, destructively, through that laptop.
> That's just not frugal.

How many feet can be considered too close? How far should be a surge
protector
from appliances connected to it?

Thanks for your aid and time.

From: s on
On May 4, 12:50 pm, w_tom <w_t...(a)usa.net> wrote:
> On May 4, 9:48 am, s <s...(a)mailinator.com> wrote:
>
> > Agreed, but they(mystery charges, fees and taxes) should be equal for
> > all. If I am charged lot more
> > than some household who use far less than me then either someone is
> > tapping into my water/electric usage
> > or there is a large leakage.
>
> After doing the 'theoretically it should do this', well, junior high
> school science. Do that theory. Then collect experimental evidence.
> Learn to read the meters. Only when consumption is known
> theoretically AND then confirmed with 'experimental' numbers from
> meters; only then do you have a fact.
>
> Run certain appliances, know what they are suppose to consume, and
> then see same numbers on the gas, electric, or water meter.

Thanks. I will collect the evidence.

Incidentally, I noticed my earlier post was incorrect. I said "If I am
charged lot more
than some household who use far less than me then either someone is
tapping into my water/electric usage
or there is a large leakage." I intended to say
" If I am charged lot more
than some household who use far more(I inadvertently used less
instead) than me then either someone is
tapping into my water/electric usage
or there is a large leakage."
I am sorry for the confusion.

From: w_tom on
On May 4, 3:33 pm, s <s...(a)mailinator.com> wrote:
> Thanks. I will collect the evidence.
>
> Incidentally, I noticed my earlier post was incorrect. I said "If I am
> charged lot more
> than some household who use far less than me then either
> someone is tapping into my water/electric usage or there
> is a large leakage." I intended to say ...

I had already appreciated your intent. Doing those calculations and
then confirming them with the meter would address that and other
potential problems. For example, is the meter 'out of calibration'?
Of are your bills (meter readings) being confused with another
consumer? And finally, by doing these numbers, one begins to put
power consumption into perspective. Often people don't realize how
much a refrigerator consumes or how little some entertainment
appliances consume. The incandescent bulb consumers about seven times
more electricity compared to a Compact Fluorescent of same intensity.
Some will even proclaim that startup creates massive energy
consumption; assuming it is cheaper to leave something one.

Doing the number is to confirm calibration and billing errors do not
exist; AND to learn a perspective. Good luck with your research.

Meanwhile, consider this rather technically impressive tool (Kill-a-
Watt):
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00009MDBU
Nothing can inform better than the numbers.

From: val189 on
2000 to 3000 gals a month is not bad for two person household.
I use 2000 most months, once a while I'll hit the 3000 mark.
Even with 4 person company for a week, I never hit the 4000. I
replaced toilets
with low flow types, use shut off valve on shower head, no half loads
of dishes
or clothes.
Did you mention whether you do laundry at home or schlep it out?

From: Gary Heston on
In article <1178295013.894128.303540(a)y5g2000hsa.googlegroups.com>,
s <s(a)mailinator.com> wrote:
>On May 4, 10:23 am, Zilbandy <z...(a)zilbandyREMOVETHIS.com> wrote:
[ ... ]
>> My wife rented office space in a small office complex many years ago,
>> and her electric bill seemed unusually large for her office size.
>> Turns out the complex outdoor lighting and a billboard sign were wired
>> to her office's electric meter. She complained to the landlord and
>> they worked out an agreement that they both could live with.

>Thanks for the reply. I clarified it with my landlord and he told he
>was paying for
>the lights outside the apartment but considering my bills I am
>skeptical.

Presumably, you have a breaker panel in your place; turn off all the
breakers, then map out which breakers do what by turning on one at a
time and checking outlets with a lamp and lights via their switch.

Sketch out a map and mark every outlet and switch on it before you
start. You should have a double breaker (220V) for your water heater
and another for your stove. Once you find the breakers that control
what you need (lights, stove, refrigerator, water heater, the outlets
you know you use) leave the rest off.

Someone I used to work with had a high electric bill in their
apartment; they tracked it down to a workshop used by the apartment
complex maintenance staff, who had a habit of leaving the lights in
the workshop on 24/7. After offering to prosecute, their rent got
lowered.


Gary

--
Gary Heston gheston(a)hiwaay.net http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

Yoko Onos' former driver tried to extort $2M from her, threating to
"release embarassing recordings...". What, he has a copy of her album?
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