From: Logan Shaw on
w_tom wrote:
> What would Logan's surge protector see during a typically
> destructive surge? Nothing. No voltage because same voltage is on
> both wires. That is zero volts to the protector while surge passes
> destructively through an adjacent appliance. Yes, some protectors are
> designed to protect from a surge defined by Logan. But those are not
> surges that typically destroy electronics.

The question wasn't how to effectively protect electronics. The question
was whether a (typical) surge protector uses any extra electricity.

- Logan
From: w_tom on
On May 6, 2:24 am, Logan Shaw <lshaw-use...(a)austin.rr.com> wrote:
> The question wasn't how to effectively protect electronics. The question
> was whether a (typical) surge protector uses any extra electricity.

Then why did you post obvious myths from that howstuffworks.com web
page?

Meanwhile, energy consumption of surge protectors was posted
previously starting with:
> Surge protector is a switch. It is not something magical. It is
> a switch that remains open - conducts no electricity - except
> when a massive surge current arrives. When the switch
> closes, then that current is diverted.

What a protector does was described. That is not relevant to energy
consumption. So why did you post myths from howstuffworks.com? It
neither answers the OPs question nor provides technically accurate
information.

Well, the OP did move on to ask for further information:
> How many feet can be considered too close? How far should
> be a surge protector from appliances connected to it?

howstuffworks.com pretends that wire length is irrelevant. The
author's questions were answered elsewhere including an example of why
its indicator lamps cannot not report a protector as good and what
that ground light may be reporting. These also reply to the OPs
questions. howstuffworks.com provided nothing useful and littel that
was accurate.

From: Logan Shaw on
w_tom wrote:
> On May 6, 2:24 am, Logan Shaw <lshaw-use...(a)austin.rr.com> wrote:
>> The question wasn't how to effectively protect electronics. The question
>> was whether a (typical) surge protector uses any extra electricity.
>
> Then why did you post obvious myths from that howstuffworks.com web
> page?

You're saying that surge protectors don't commonly use varistors?
Yes or no?

That's the only thing that's relevant to whether surge protectors
draw power.

- Logan
From: Don K on
"Logan Shaw" <lshaw-usenet(a)austin.rr.com> wrote in message
news:463e1c81$0$4658$4c368faf(a)roadrunner.com...
> w_tom wrote:
>> On May 6, 2:24 am, Logan Shaw <lshaw-use...(a)austin.rr.com> wrote:
>>> The question wasn't how to effectively protect electronics. The question
>>> was whether a (typical) surge protector uses any extra electricity.
>>
>> Then why did you post obvious myths from that howstuffworks.com web
>> page?
>
> You're saying that surge protectors don't commonly use varistors?
> Yes or no?
>
> That's the only thing that's relevant to whether surge protectors
> draw power.
>
> - Logan

From the tone, I think he's fighting other demons.

Don


From: val189 on

s wrote:

>
I use the shower for 10mins/day

If you are letting the water run constantly for 10 minutes....waaay
too long.
Plug the drain, and let water collect. See just how much you are
using
per shower. I read somewhere that if you can fill a bucket in a minute
or less, you are letting
the water run too fast. Get one of those shut off valves and use it
religiously.

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