From: s on
>
> If you have a low-energy-efficiency fridge and live where electricity
> cost is near or above national USA average, you can probably do well to
> buy your own replacement if you expect to use it for a few years.
> Otherwise I advise shopping for other landlords if that has reasonable
> expectation of reducing your monthly expense (which I consider more a
> matter of question).

Thanks for the reply.

The issue is I don't want to stay in this place more than
my lease term. Landlord is too bad. My beaker switch was emitting
sparks. When I informed him he did not
do anything. Finally, I had to hire an electrician from a nearby shop
to fix it at my own expense. The City Utility people
told me it is the landlord's responsibility. Moving a fridge I believe
could be difficult. Shopping for other
landlord's is not viable till the lease expires as then I will be
breaking the lease(which states if I do that
I will be responible for all rent,lose my security deposit and
attorney charges landlord will incur to take me
to court to get the remaining month's rent out of me. This has
happened with people who live in this area. Being a
landlord town it is quite notorious for such cases. Another issue is
they will ding my credit score and whenever
I try to get another place the new landlord will want to check with
the previous one to determine why I actually moved.
If my previous landlord(who is my present) gives him a bad press about
me it will be difficult for me to get a new
apartment. I have recently graduated so lack the funds to purchase a
home. Also, my present job is temporary
so I don't want to do any investments in this area at present.


> If there is cleaning you can and are allowed to do or which you can do
> well and get away with, it is in your interest to do so should you have a
> lazy landlord. Maybe move to a different landlord or to homeownership,
> but don't pay more to not let something needing to get done which you can
> do until it's done by the landlord just because the landlord is supposed
> to be responsible to do it.

Yes, but it is the cost/benefit ration before I invest as you and many
have indicated.
If I buy a new energy efficient fridge/AC then it will not compensate
for energy costs within
some 9 months. I have done the cleaning of fridge coils but for water
heater I don't
know and I don't want to hire someone as it could be expensive(and if
something
goes wrong I could be blamed by the landlord). What I am doing
is finding if anyone has purchased a new refrigerator and if so can I
get their
old(which hopefully will be more energy efficient than me)
one for a proper price. This has to be done carefully from someone I
know rather than
ebay and other sellers. The seller reputation is a factor in places
like ebay but still
I am skeptical in buying second hand things from auction places.




> Heck, sometimes in some cases you can even get documentable necessary
> work costs that the landlord needs to do but does not do deducted from
> rent!

Yes, but they are quite rare.

> Makes me think that if you need to live in the same apartment for at
> least 3 years, you have a good chance of positive impact to your bottom
> line by buying your own equipment. If you do so, you get to take it with
> you when you move!

No, after condition of equipment, insulation issues
I don't want to stay even till end of lease(but have to as have no
choice). I could
go to the City enforcement agency and complain about condition of my
apartment but
that would create more legal problems which my landlord has the time,
energy and legal support
to tackle but I don't. My work place people are saying you are
unfortunate. They have also
suffered such issues and they told me as you needed a place fast that
worked against you.
If you had time you could move into a place which has positive reviews
from people you
know and trust. But, I came in at a time when only few were vacant.


> >> > Some
> >> > do have equipment like mine but they generally have 4 or more incomes
> >> > in their household so
> >> > an extra 60-70$ per month due to old equipment does not matter that
> >> > much to them like me. When I told
> >> > my landlord that I am losing 60-70$ per month due to his old equipment
> >> > he retorted that it
> >> > is shameful and lazy on my part to be on single income in today's age
> >> > where most people have one full time and two or more part time jobs.
>
> I think that income has low relevance to ability to reduce outgo!
> I say consider means to reduce outgo!

Correct, even if your income is high you should not spend if you don't
have to(IMHO)
but what I was referring to is people on lower end like me get
impacted lot more
than people on higher end. There are few places like mine but they get
rented out
as the community is fairly affluent as I mentioned before so people
living in that
area don't need to worry if they are spending 2-3K per year more on
utility bills.

> Room heater? I suspect that this is on your own, and those tend to be
> already at close to maximum possible efficiency.

I doubt it considering the condition of other equipment and from what
the energy
audit people told me that anything is efficient in my apartment. It
could be consuming
4-5 time more electricity than a normal room heater. I had got one
from Walmart
which claims it uses 1.5KWH per hour when I was in NY, brought it with
me and plan
to use than rather than which is in my apartment. That I got for about
18( a small one but
adequate to warm a small room where I stay most of the time when I am
at home).
The difficulty here is bad insulation in my apartment as the energy
audit people
will require it to run lot more than it has to as cold air will
slip in through leaks and hot air will escape. Asking the landlord to
fix the insualtion
was useless so I myself plugged the holes using small plastic
bags,tapes and hope
it will be fine in winter.


>I think a blanket or
> two, a quilt or two or a comforter or a duvet and a few sweaters and
> warmer pajamas (or sweatpants over pajama pants or maybe an electric
> blanket) would be a good investment.

Being from NY I have faced more snow there than this area has
encountered in past few
years and have all the required apparel you have mentioned. But, when
the outside
temperature is too cold all the clothes can't help and you need a room
heater
for some time.

> A/C is an area where if the landlord has bad old tech or equipment
> more than halfway aged to its grave then you may do well by taking
> ownership of such and buying the replacement if you expect to live there
> at least a few more years.
>
> >Our city charges about 15c/KWH (SNIP reasons)
>
> Above USA national average - conservation pays even more! If you can
> benefit from conservation moves even if you pay for them despite landlord
> owning the equipment that can be improved, guess who is the one to have
> the bottom line improved by forking over the money to buy better
> equipment?

Had I a certainity of living in this apartment or area I would have
done that
but my present situtation of a temporary job forestalls that.

> Don't like that - shop for landlords that give their tenants lower
> tenant-responsible energy bills, or move to homeownership!

Lease issues, checks by prospective landlords to previous landlords
and that there are
some 8-9 months for my lease to expire makes me think I am stuck here
for some time.

> >Agreed, but I believe it is his job to give me reasonably proper
> >equipment.
> >Mine according to the energy audit people is about 15-20 years old.
>
> If you can improve your bottom line and you landlord cannot do so by
> replacing any particular equipment item, chances are that it's up to you
> to take ownership of such equipment items!
> I suggest where possible replace without disposing of the landlord's
> junk, and take your better equipment with you when you move, and leave
> your rented bleeper with the costly junk that the landlord provided.

I have done that for room heater by planning to use mine rather than
his but for fridge
due to my situation it is not practical. I am looking for fridge's of
people which
might not be as bad as mine and who can sell it to me for a reduced
rate.

> As for new tenants: I do advise considering monthly energy expenses by
> landlord-provided necessary equipment when shopping for rented homes!

Yes, but lot of factors come into play for monthly utility bills.
First how efficient equipment is, how your landlord has tweaked them
or allows
you to tweak and maintain them(cleaning,servicing of equipment),
insulation
of a place and then tenant's usage. When I saw the apartment there was
no
electricity or water so I could not determine anything about the
equipment. Did not
know landlord did not care about fixing, maintaining or servicing his
equipment or how
well the insulation was. He assured me when I saw it he will fix
things promptly.
I had landlords before who claimed that and had fulfilled their claims
so I believed him but
that turned out to be a mistake.

> Whose bills get reduced? If not the landlord's bills, then you have to
> replace the equipment on your own (without disposing of the landlord's
> equipment) or else wait for the landlord's equipment to die a natural
> death through no fault or irresponsibility of your own and hope the
> landlord actually replaces the junk with good new equipment as opposed
> to replacement junk that works well enough to keep the landlord in
> compliance with your lease.

Agreed, I am in a sort of fix where there are somethings I cannot
change.
My situation of temporary job, bad landlord, equipment cost, my low
income
leads me where there is not much I can do. I believe even if his
equipment breaks
down he will bring another one which is equally bad if not worse(and
hope he does not
blame me for that and increase my rent which is quite likely with my
landlord)


> How do you have power to make the landlord reduce your monthly home
> cost bottom line and not his? Any recommendations from the energy audit
> that would benefit you and not benefit the landlord are probably up to
> you to do and only where permitted by your lease.

Complaining to the City that my landlord is not providing me a
reasonable housing
is an option but that would create serious legal
issues for me, not to mention finding a place elsewhere(when
prospective landlords
do a check with previous ones), costs and time. It is like filing a
case against your landlord
and legal matters are generally too expensive in my opinion.

> It appears to me that replacing incandescent lightbulbs with CFLs (by
> you) is normally allowable. It appears to me that buying a
> more-energy-efficient fridge and storing the landlord's lousy fridge is
> usually allowable.

I already did that when I was suggested in this group by getting CFLs
and for a
fridge I am asking friends and people I know if they have a old one to
sell.

>You get to take your fridge with you when you move
> (when feasible) and you have the responsibility to not in any way deprive
> the landlord of his junky fridge.

If I get a old one which uses less power than mine I intend to get it.

> Sadly, I would say that alternatives are moving to a different
> neighborhood, getting into homeownership, or getting rich by buying rental
> property in your neighborhood.

Agreed, I am in a sort of fix where there are somethings I cannot
change.
My situation of temporary job, heavy loans, lease agrement, bad
landlord, equipment cost, my low income
leads me where there is not much I can do. Had I a permanent job I
would consider getting into
homeownership or purhcasing rental property but moving is difficult as
that means breaking the
lease which may involve lot of legal issues and difficulties finding a
new apartment(due to checks
on previous landlord).


> And I am a tenant who just got into a lease that I likely have to pay
> rent on for the next 11 months! I just hope the fridge here is not so old
> and lousy that I would do better by storing it in my home while buying,
> owning and operating a fridge of my own in an apartment where space to
> some extent disfavors having two fridges with one doing nothing but taking
> up space! (as opposed to doing no major equipment purchase, otherwise see
> if I will be better off a few years from now by moving to homeownership or
> investing in rental property or staying where I am and investing in a
> broad market stock index mutual fund!)

Thanks for your aid and time. All the best with your apartment. Some
people
are little unfortunate like me but I hope things will improve for me.

Just one question is it safe to treat the water heater switch like a
bulb switch. It was initially
on whole time now I am turning it on in morning for 10 mins and then
turning it off.

Can someone please advise?

Thanks a lot.
> - Don Klipstein (d...(a)misty.com)


From: pc on
s wrote:
>> If you have a low-energy-efficiency fridge and live where electricity
>> cost is near or above national USA average, you can probably do well to
>> buy your own replacement if you expect to use it for a few years.
>> Otherwise I advise shopping for other landlords if that has reasonable
>> expectation of reducing your monthly expense (which I consider more a
>> matter of question).
>
> Thanks for the reply.
>
> The issue is I don't want to stay in this place more than
> my lease term. Landlord is too bad. My beaker switch was emitting
> sparks. When I informed him he did not
> do anything. Finally, I had to hire an electrician from a nearby shop
> to fix it at my own expense. The City Utility people
> told me it is the landlord's responsibility. Moving a fridge I believe
> could be difficult. Shopping for other
> landlord's is not viable till the lease expires as then I will be
> breaking the lease(which states if I do that
> I will be responible for all rent,lose my security deposit and
> attorney charges landlord will incur to take me
> to court to get the remaining month's rent out of me. This has
> happened with people who live in this area. Being a
> landlord town it is quite notorious for such cases. Another issue is
> they will ding my credit score and whenever
> I try to get another place the new landlord will want to check with
> the previous one to determine why I actually moved.
> If my previous landlord(who is my present) gives him a bad press about
> me it will be difficult for me to get a new
> apartment. I have recently graduated so lack the funds to purchase a
> home. Also, my present job is temporary
> so I don't want to do any investments in this area at present.
>
>
>> If there is cleaning you can and are allowed to do or which you can do
>> well and get away with, it is in your interest to do so should you have a
>> lazy landlord. Maybe move to a different landlord or to homeownership,
>> but don't pay more to not let something needing to get done which you can
>> do until it's done by the landlord just because the landlord is supposed
>> to be responsible to do it.
>
> Yes, but it is the cost/benefit ration before I invest as you and many
> have indicated.
> If I buy a new energy efficient fridge/AC then it will not compensate
> for energy costs within
> some 9 months. I have done the cleaning of fridge coils but for water
> heater I don't
> know and I don't want to hire someone as it could be expensive(and if
> something
> goes wrong I could be blamed by the landlord). What I am doing
> is finding if anyone has purchased a new refrigerator and if so can I
> get their
> old(which hopefully will be more energy efficient than me)
> one for a proper price. This has to be done carefully from someone I
> know rather than
> ebay and other sellers. The seller reputation is a factor in places
> like ebay but still
> I am skeptical in buying second hand things from auction places.
>
>
>
>
>> Heck, sometimes in some cases you can even get documentable necessary
>> work costs that the landlord needs to do but does not do deducted from
>> rent!
>
> Yes, but they are quite rare.
>
>> Makes me think that if you need to live in the same apartment for at
>> least 3 years, you have a good chance of positive impact to your bottom
>> line by buying your own equipment. If you do so, you get to take it with
>> you when you move!
>
> No, after condition of equipment, insulation issues
> I don't want to stay even till end of lease(but have to as have no
> choice). I could
> go to the City enforcement agency and complain about condition of my
> apartment but
> that would create more legal problems which my landlord has the time,
> energy and legal support
> to tackle but I don't. My work place people are saying you are
> unfortunate. They have also
> suffered such issues and they told me as you needed a place fast that
> worked against you.
> If you had time you could move into a place which has positive reviews
> from people you
> know and trust. But, I came in at a time when only few were vacant.
>
>
>>>>> Some
>>>>> do have equipment like mine but they generally have 4 or more incomes
>>>>> in their household so
>>>>> an extra 60-70$ per month due to old equipment does not matter that
>>>>> much to them like me. When I told
>>>>> my landlord that I am losing 60-70$ per month due to his old equipment
>>>>> he retorted that it
>>>>> is shameful and lazy on my part to be on single income in today's age
>>>>> where most people have one full time and two or more part time jobs.
>> I think that income has low relevance to ability to reduce outgo!
>> I say consider means to reduce outgo!
>
> Correct, even if your income is high you should not spend if you don't
> have to(IMHO)
> but what I was referring to is people on lower end like me get
> impacted lot more
> than people on higher end. There are few places like mine but they get
> rented out
> as the community is fairly affluent as I mentioned before so people
> living in that
> area don't need to worry if they are spending 2-3K per year more on
> utility bills.
>
>> Room heater? I suspect that this is on your own, and those tend to be
>> already at close to maximum possible efficiency.
>
> I doubt it considering the condition of other equipment and from what
> the energy
> audit people told me that anything is efficient in my apartment. It
> could be consuming
> 4-5 time more electricity than a normal room heater. I had got one
> from Walmart
> which claims it uses 1.5KWH per hour when I was in NY, brought it with
> me and plan
> to use than rather than which is in my apartment. That I got for about
> 18( a small one but
> adequate to warm a small room where I stay most of the time when I am
> at home).
> The difficulty here is bad insulation in my apartment as the energy
> audit people
> will require it to run lot more than it has to as cold air will
> slip in through leaks and hot air will escape. Asking the landlord to
> fix the insualtion
> was useless so I myself plugged the holes using small plastic
> bags,tapes and hope
> it will be fine in winter.
>
>
>> I think a blanket or
>> two, a quilt or two or a comforter or a duvet and a few sweaters and
>> warmer pajamas (or sweatpants over pajama pants or maybe an electric
>> blanket) would be a good investment.
>
> Being from NY I have faced more snow there than this area has
> encountered in past few
> years and have all the required apparel you have mentioned. But, when
> the outside
> temperature is too cold all the clothes can't help and you need a room
> heater
> for some time.
>
>> A/C is an area where if the landlord has bad old tech or equipment
>> more than halfway aged to its grave then you may do well by taking
>> ownership of such and buying the replacement if you expect to live there
>> at least a few more years.
>>
>>> Our city charges about 15c/KWH (SNIP reasons)
>> Above USA national average - conservation pays even more! If you can
>> benefit from conservation moves even if you pay for them despite landlord
>> owning the equipment that can be improved, guess who is the one to have
>> the bottom line improved by forking over the money to buy better
>> equipment?
>
> Had I a certainity of living in this apartment or area I would have
> done that
> but my present situtation of a temporary job forestalls that.
>
>> Don't like that - shop for landlords that give their tenants lower
>> tenant-responsible energy bills, or move to homeownership!
>
> Lease issues, checks by prospective landlords to previous landlords
> and that there are
> some 8-9 months for my lease to expire makes me think I am stuck here
> for some time.
>
>>> Agreed, but I believe it is his job to give me reasonably proper
>>> equipment.
>>> Mine according to the energy audit people is about 15-20 years old.
>> If you can improve your bottom line and you landlord cannot do so by
>> replacing any particular equipment item, chances are that it's up to you
>> to take ownership of such equipment items!
>> I suggest where possible replace without disposing of the landlord's
>> junk, and take your better equipment with you when you move, and leave
>> your rented bleeper with the costly junk that the landlord provided.
>
> I have done that for room heater by planning to use mine rather than
> his but for fridge
> due to my situation it is not practical. I am looking for fridge's of
> people which
> might not be as bad as mine and who can sell it to me for a reduced
> rate.
>
>> As for new tenants: I do advise considering monthly energy expenses by
>> landlord-provided necessary equipment when shopping for rented homes!
>
> Yes, but lot of factors come into play for monthly utility bills.
> First how efficient equipment is, how your landlord has tweaked them
> or allows
> you to tweak and maintain them(cleaning,servicing of equipment),
> insulation
> of a place and then tenant's usage. When I saw the apartment there was
> no
> electricity or water so I could not determine anything about the
> equipment. Did not
> know landlord did not care about fixing, maintaining or servicing his
> equipment or how
> well the insulation was. He assured me when I saw it he will fix
> things promptly.
> I had landlords before who claimed that and had fulfilled their claims
> so I believed him but
> that turned out to be a mistake.
>
>> Whose bills get reduced? If not the landlord's bills, then you have to
>> replace the equipment on your own (without disposing of the landlord's
>> equipment) or else wait for the landlord's equipment to die a natural
>> death through no fault or irresponsibility of your own and hope the
>> landlord actually replaces the junk with good new equipment as opposed
>> to replacement junk that works well enough to keep the landlord in
>> compliance with your lease.
>
> Agreed, I am in a sort of fix where there are somethings I cannot
> change.
> My situation of temporary job, bad landlord, equipment cost, my low
> income
> leads me where there is not much I can do. I believe even if his
> equipment breaks
> down he will bring another one which is equally bad if not worse(and
> hope he does not
> blame me for that and increase my rent which is quite likely with my
> landlord)
>
>
>> How do you have power to make the landlord reduce your monthly home
>> cost bottom line and not his? Any recommendations from the energy audit
>> that would benefit you and not benefit the landlord are probably up to
>> you to do and only where permitted by your lease.
>
> Complaining to the City that my landlord is not providing me a
> reasonable housing
> is an option but that would create serious legal
> issues for me, not to mention finding a place elsewhere(when
> prospective landlords
> do a check with previous ones), costs and time. It is like filing a
> case against your landlord
> and legal matters are generally too expensive in my opinion.
>
>> It appears to me that replacing incandescent lightbulbs with CFLs (by
>> you) is normally allowable. It appears to me that buying a
>> more-energy-efficient fridge and storing the landlord's lousy fridge is
>> usually allowable.
>
> I already did that when I was suggested in this group by getting CFLs
> and for a
> fridge I am asking friends and people I know if they have a old one to
> sell.
>
>> You get to take your fridge with you when you move
>> (when feasible) and you have the responsibility to not in any way deprive
>> the landlord of his junky fridge.
>
> If I get a old one which uses less power than mine I intend to get it.
>
>> Sadly, I would say that alternatives are moving to a different
>> neighborhood, getting into homeownership, or getting rich by buying rental
>> property in your neighborhood.
>
> Agreed, I am in a sort of fix where there are somethings I cannot
> change.
> My situation of temporary job, heavy loans, lease agrement, bad
> landlord, equipment cost, my low income
> leads me where there is not much I can do. Had I a permanent job I
> would consider getting into
> homeownership or purhcasing rental property but moving is difficult as
> that means breaking the
> lease which may involve lot of legal issues and difficulties finding a
> new apartment(due to checks
> on previous landlord).
>
>
>> And I am a tenant who just got into a lease that I likely have to pay
>> rent on for the next 11 months! I just hope the fridge here is not so old
>> and lousy that I would do better by storing it in my home while buying,
>> owning and operating a fridge of my own in an apartment where space to
>> some extent disfavors having two fridges with one doing nothing but taking
>> up space! (as opposed to doing no major equipment purchase, otherwise see
>> if I will be better off a few years from now by moving to homeownership or
>> investing in rental property or staying where I am and investing in a
>> broad market stock index mutual fund!)
>
> Thanks for your aid and time. All the best with your apartment. Some
> people
> are little unfortunate like me but I hope things will improve for me.
>
> Just one question is it safe to treat the water heater switch like a
> bulb switch. It was initially
> on whole time now I am turning it on in morning for 10 mins and then
> turning it off.
>
> Can someone please advise?
>
> Thanks a lot.
>> - Don Klipstein (d...(a)misty.com)
>
>

s..

As many posters have said, your bills don't seem way out of line. A $50
or $60 bill, when you heat water with electric and have an old fridge is
pretty good.

You have spent money on Kil-A Watts and other testers. You have spent a
great deal of psychic energy on solving this problem.

Spend a few dollars on caulk and a caulking gun if you have gaps and
cracks in walls. Don't worry about insulation. You can't do anything
about it anyways.

Per your water heater...you do not need to drain it. Water in FL does
not usually have sediment in it like in some other areas of the country.
There really are no maintenance issues with the heater. It
works..until it doesn't work.

You can see if the temperature settings are correct. Turn off the
circuit breaker. Remove BOTH panels on the front of the heater. Inside
are thermostats. With a small slot screwdriver reduce them both. I
have mine at 110 degrees.

If you previously had problems with your circuit breaker panel, like you
mentioned, I would not flip the water heater breaker every day.
Reducing the temperature should help alleviate the need to do that.

Good luck.
From: s on

pc,
Thanks for the reply.

> As many posters have said, your bills don't seem way out of line. A $50
> or $60 bill, when you heat water with electric and have an old fridge is
> pretty good.

Yes, but I am worried what if my equipment degrades more, heater usage
in winter or fan/AC usage in summer.
The problem is in my area there are some fixed charges of 55 per
month(water,drainage,garbage,fire,storm,electricity) which is mnimum
55. So, even if I don't use anything my fixed charges will be 55.
Electric bill of 60(now) makes it 115 and then water,drainage makes it
close to 130. My bills don't seem out of line for a average household
of 3-4 people who use A.C./heater/fans extensively but when the energy
audit people told me instead of 90KWH you are getting 297KWH and when
people in this area like me who use fan/AC get about 142KWH I feel I
should do something.

> Spend a few dollars on caulk and a caulking gun if you have gaps and
> cracks in walls. Don't worry about insulation. You can't do anything
> about it anyways.

Thanks. I will do that.

> Per your water heater...you do not need to drain it. Water in FL does
> not usually have sediment in it like in some other areas of the country.
> There really are no maintenance issues with the heater. It
> works..until it doesn't work.
>
> You can see if the temperature settings are correct. Turn off the
> circuit breaker. Remove BOTH panels on the front of the heater. Inside
> are thermostats. With a small slot screwdriver reduce them both. I
> have mine at 110 degrees.

I am waiting for the landlord's maintenance person to show me that
which will not take
place until few weeks if at all it takes place. Trouble is my landlord
does not know how to do it
and does not want me to do it even if it is just opening some screws.
I suspect he does not
want even his maintenance person as that maintenance person is like a
contractor who will charge my
landlord for each visit he makes to a tenant's place.

> If you previously had problems with your circuit breaker panel, like you
> mentioned, I would not flip the water heater breaker every day.
> Reducing the temperature should help alleviate the need to do that.

I am speculating it is bad circuit breaker which is too old
or something else on those lines.

I thought if my water heater runs for only 10mins/day it could be a
significant savings rather than if I leave it on
continously(in which case it may run for a hour or so daily depending
on outside temperature, insulation etc.). Was I thinking wrong? Is
flipping the water heater breaker an incorrect approach as they are
not designed to be used as
bulb switch?


Thanks for your aid and time.

From: Jeff on
<snip>
>
>
> If you have a low-energy-efficiency fridge and live where electricity
> cost is near or above national USA average, you can probably do well to
> buy your own replacement if you expect to use it for a few years.
> Otherwise I advise shopping for other landlords if that has reasonable
> expectation of reducing your monthly expense (which I consider more a
> matter of question).

Where's the energy loss at? Is it mostly loss through the insulation
or is it efficiency of the compressor? Not that anyone makes a
refrigerator blanket but it is conceivable to control some of these losses.

Jeff

<snip>
From: Rod Speed on
Jeff <dont_bug_me(a)all.uk> wrote:
> <snip>
>>
>>
>> If you have a low-energy-efficiency fridge and live where
>> electricity cost is near or above national USA average, you can
>> probably do well to buy your own replacement if you expect to use it
>> for a few years. Otherwise I advise shopping for other landlords if
>> that has reasonable expectation of reducing your monthly expense
>> (which I consider more a matter of question).

> Where's the energy loss at?

Thru the insulation and the door seal.

> Is it mostly loss through the insulation

Yep.

> or is it efficiency of the compressor?

Nope.

> Not that anyone makes a refrigerator blanket but it is conceivable to control some of these
> losses.

Yep, most obviously with fixing deteriorated door seals.


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