From: sno on


Jeff wrote:
>
> <snip>
> >
> >
> > If you have a low-energy-efficiency fridge and live where electricity
> > cost is near or above national USA average, you can probably do well to
> > buy your own replacement if you expect to use it for a few years.
> > Otherwise I advise shopping for other landlords if that has reasonable
> > expectation of reducing your monthly expense (which I consider more a
> > matter of question).
>
> Where's the energy loss at? Is it mostly loss through the insulation
> or is it efficiency of the compressor? Not that anyone makes a
> refrigerator blanket but it is conceivable to control some of these losses.
>
> Jeff
>
> <snip>

If you frig is really using that much electricity and it is one of
those that has the cooling coils on the bottom, with a fan that
blows against them.....rather then coils on the back...
it is possible that the fan is bad....the frig can keep on working
but the only indication that the fan is not cooling the coils is
an extreme use of electricity....open doors and when
frig comes on fan should come on also....

If it is bad then you can have your landlord bring in an appliance
repairman to replace the fan....if he will not replace the frig...

Also check the seals around the door...if they are the accordion
plastic type open the accordion and check there are no holes in
the gasket....if there are get the model number from the plate
that is usually at the bottom front center of the frig door....go
to an appliance parts place with the model number and get a new
gasket...not expensive and usually fairly easy to replace....

hope helps...have fun.....sno

--
No matter how dangerous nuclear power may or
may not be.....
Is it any more dangerous then what we are doing
now.....???

This tag line is generated by:
SLNG (Silly Little Nuclear Generator)
From: Logan Shaw on
s wrote:
> The first KillaWatt was having issues. I saw small sparks when I
> plugged my refrigerator
> into it.

Why would sparks be an issue? What else would you expect to see at
the moment that you bring together two electrical conductors which
are at a significantly different electrical potential (that is, voltage)?
The big difference in potential means that electrons want to move
from one point to the other very badly. Since air is not a perfect
insulator, when the conductors get close enough together, the
electron will jump across.

As long as that is happening, there is no issue.

- Logan
From: Logan Shaw on
s wrote:
> It is placed below my apartment. Landlord does not know how to do
> maintenance. He has a part time help for that purpose. I don't know
> how to open, clean, tweak and service it so that it uses proper amount
> of electricity rather than twice or thrice what it claims to use. I
> have already reduced running it to only 10mins/day but hope it does
> not use 10KWH/hr instead of its rated 4.5KWH/hr.

There is no chance at all that it is using "10KWH/hr". That's because
"10KWH/hr" is garbled, nonsense terminology. (And so is "4.5KWH/hr".
I can't imagine that a water heater really has that as a rating.)

If you want to start thinking logically about how much energy (or how
much power) the water heater is using, you need to understand the
concepts involved. Otherwise, you are just making stuff up.

- Logan
From: Don Klipstein on
In article <4647db14$0$8935$4c368faf(a)roadrunner.com>, Logan Shaw wrote:
>s wrote:
>> It is placed below my apartment. Landlord does not know how to do
>> maintenance. He has a part time help for that purpose. I don't know
>> how to open, clean, tweak and service it so that it uses proper amount
>> of electricity rather than twice or thrice what it claims to use. I
>> have already reduced running it to only 10mins/day but hope it does
>> not use 10KWH/hr instead of its rated 4.5KWH/hr.
>
>There is no chance at all that it is using "10KWH/hr". That's because
>"10KWH/hr" is garbled, nonsense terminology. (And so is "4.5KWH/hr".
>I can't imagine that a water heater really has that as a rating.)
>
>If you want to start thinking logically about how much energy (or how
>much power) the water heater is using, you need to understand the
>concepts involved. Otherwise, you are just making stuff up.

KWH/hr means kilowatts.

- Don Klipstein (don(a)misty.com)
From: s on
On May 13, 11:34 pm, Logan Shaw <lshaw-use...(a)austin.rr.com> wrote:
> s wrote:
> > The first KillaWatt was having issues. I saw small sparks when I
> > plugged my refrigerator
> > into it.
>
> Why would sparks be an issue? What else would you expect to see at
> the moment that you bring together two electrical conductors which
> are at a significantly different electrical potential (that is, voltage)?
> The big difference in potential means that electrons want to move
> from one point to the other very badly. Since air is not a perfect
> insulator, when the conductors get close enough together, the
> electron will jump across.
>
> As long as that is happening, there is no issue.

Logan,

Thanks for the reply and my apologies for the confusion.

Not at the moment only but also upto some time after I plugged it in
so I thought something could be wrong.
I did not mention that in my previous message which created confusion.
Coupled with the fact that most outlets
in my house don't have ground protection and my knowledge about
electricity is quite low made me speculate
incorrectly that something is wrong.

Thanks for your help and time.

>
> - Logan


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