From: s on
On May 3, 9:14 am, barbie gee <barbie....(a)NOSESPAMgmail.com> wrote:
> On Wed, 2 May 2007, s wrote:
> > On May 2, 9:22 pm, "Dave" <n...(a)nohow.not> wrote:
> >>> Well, when I checked with other people at my work they all report
> >>> around that number 140KWH. This made me feel something is wrong with
> >>> my usage. Besides, if I stay at home less than them and don't have
> >>> devices like T.V.,A.C. why should be mine higher than them?
> >>> '
>
> >> S - don't take this the wrong way, but either you are a troll, or your
> >> neighbors' electric meters are WAY off, apparently only reporting about
> >> 10-25% of the electricty that your neighbors are actually using.
>
> > Dave,
> > Thanks for the reply. But, what made you think I am a troll? The
> > people with whom I checked at work live in a different area than mine.
> > So, their landlord might have given them better equipment than mine.
> > Also, there are many things they might have tweaked which I did not
> > like adjusting temperature of water heater, cleaning of fridge filters
> > and other things. I need to determine what are those tweaks so I
> > posted in this group seeking aid.
>
> >> One
> >> average sized window A/C unit for example, will use about 160-250KWH per
> >> month, all by itself. That's twice the total you claim someone else using
> >> A/C is using, for their entire household. Typical household electricity
> >> usage is about 700KWH per month, unless they run A/C also, in which case
> >> totals over 1000KWH per month are not unusal.
>
> > Not quite. Many people with whom I have checked use only 140-200KWH
> > per month.
> > My understanding is it depends on type of equipment,how well it is
> > tweaked and amount of usage.
> > Tell me if someone uses electricity as I posted in my first post
> > shouldn't it be about 160KWH(assuming we factor 70KWH per month for
> > water heater and an energy efficient refrigerator which uses about
> > 70KWH/month)? They might have energy equipment unlike mine.
>
> > People who get more than 700KWH are those who use the A/C 12-14 hours
> > per day in my area. As I mentioned before I am new so am estimating on
> > how much others are using, what their charges are. Then I am trying to
> > figure why inspite of using lot less than others I am getting far more
> > bills.
>
> okay, more comes to mind;
>
> 1) this "checking" and "asking"... are you actually seeing peoples
> electric bills? for the same time periods? or are these self-reported
> numbers from memory or "off the top of the head"?

Yes, for the people who told me 140KWH I actually saw their bills.
They brought it as they were going to pay and I asked them casually
for viewing.Hence, my suspicions grew stronger.

> 2) are the meter readings ACTUAL or ESTIMATED? Around here, if a reader
> can't get in to see the meter, you get an Estimated reading until the
> month they actually read the meter, which is the time corrections get
> made. Does the actual reading on your meter come close to the number on
> the bill?

I believe they are actual. But, the problem is I did not note my meter
the day I moved in. The date they calculated my meter I went and
looked and it seemed close.

> 2.5) get an electrician/friend to come out and look at your breaker box,
> and figure out if you're paying for stuff not yours.

I don't know anyone as I am new to this area. But, getting a Wattmeter
as suggested is a good idea by which I can track the usage.

> 3) The water/discharge/so on stuff. That is all pro-rated by the
> municipality? They bill you directly? Make your case to them, not your
> landlord.- Hide quoted text -

Municipality told me they are going to bill me the maximum for
drainage rather than actual drainage.

Thanks for your reply and time.

> - Show quoted text -


From: pc on
s wrote:
> On May 3, 1:22 am, Anthony Matonak
> <anthony...(a)nothing.like.socal.rr.com> wrote:
>> s wrote:
>>>> How do you cook? Gas?
>>> Yes, gas.
>> You should be aware that most gas ovens use glow bars. These are
>> electric heater elements that run into hundreds of watts and remain
>> on during the entire period the oven is turned on.
>
> Thanks for the reply.
> No, mine does not. I checked my stove. There are no wires going into
> or coming out of it.
>
>> You can also purchase a kill-a-watt meter to see what each
>> appliance, like a fridge, might be using. It'll record the
>> total kWh used over a period of time.
>>
>> http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E16882715001
>
> I will do that.
>
>> You might also look for non-obvious electric stuff. Doorbell
>> transformers, porch lights, coffee machines, microwave ovens,
>> cordless phones, emergency lights, fire alarms, CO alarms,
>> anything with a timer, remote control or transformer (wall wart).
>
> No doorbell, porch lights, coffee machines, microwave ovens,
> cordless phones, emergency lights, fire alarms, CO alarms,
> anything with a timer, remote control or transformer (wall wart).
> Just a smoke alarm which runs by battery and my cell phone I charge at
> work place or library outlet.
> Thanks for your aid and time.
>> Anthony >
>
>

Below is information on how you can contact your utility, in
Tallahassee, to request a free home energy audit. Hope it helps.

> The best way to reduce your utility bill is to reduce the amount of
electricity and water you use. Your Own Utilities provides free energy
audits of both homes and commercial buildings, as well as other energy
conservation programs.
> Request a free energy audit. Make sure to have your account number
handy. It is required to submit an online request.
> You can also call Energy Services at 891-4YOU (4968), then press 42,
for more information.




From: pc on
s wrote:

>>
>> You didn't mention what's heating your water either - is it an electric
>> water heater? That's about the most expensive way to do it.
>
> I have to ascertain that. It was too dark when I got home tonight at
> 9pm to find out.
>

If you don't pay a natural gas bill, an oil or propane bill, or see
solar panels on your roof..you are heating your water with electric.
From: George Grapman on
pc wrote:
> s wrote:
>
>>>
>>> You didn't mention what's heating your water either - is it an electric
>>> water heater? That's about the most expensive way to do it.
>>
>> I have to ascertain that. It was too dark when I got home tonight at
>> 9pm to find out.
>>
>
> If you don't pay a natural gas bill, an oil or propane bill, or see
> solar panels on your roof..you are heating your water with electric.

Agreed. I lives in a place once and the first month got a huge
electric bill, way out of line for a place that size. The villain was
the electric water heater.
The electric company came out and took a look. Their only suggestion
was to leave it off as much as possible. I wound up getting up 30
minutes earlier on work days,turning it on, going back to sleep and when
I woke up there was enough hot water for a shower. Inconvenient but it
shaved quite a bit off the bill.
Also tried to wash all the dishes from the day before after eating
breakfast.

--
To reply via e-mail please delete 1 c from paccbell
From: Lou on

"s" <s(a)mailinator.com> wrote in message
news:1178113906.710874.24350(a)h2g2000hsg.googlegroups.com...
>
> Well, my neighbour's water usage is 20 gallons per month and there are
> two people in his home and he cooks a lot more than me. This is what
> made me think something is wrong.

20 GALLONS A MONTH???!!!!??? I find that hard to believe. Look at it this
way. If you have a low flow shower head, one that delivers say 2.5 gallons
a minute, and you took one shower a day, and each shower lasted exactly one
minute, and the month under consideration is 30 days long, you'd use 2.5
gallons/day X 30 days/month = 75 gallons/month even if you never flushed a
toilet or had a drink of water from the tap or brushed your teeth. If you
have an older toilet and flush it once a day, you'd use around 150 to 180
gallons of water a month. Make it a brand spanking new low volume toilet
and flush it once a day and you'd use around 1.6 gallons a day, or 48
gallons a month.

That comes to 123 gallons a month for minimal daily use of shower and
toilet. I don't think I'd care to use that neighbor's bathroom if I were to
drop by for a visit.

There are lower flow shower heads than 2.5 gllons a minute, and there are
sponge baths, so it's possible to cut this number, perhaps substanstially.
But 20 gallons of water a month for an apartment dweller or homeowner in the
US in the last few months? Except maybe in some extrordinary circumstances,
like an outhouse and bathe in the local stream, I strongly doubt it.

I think something's wrong with these numbers too - 20 gallons a month is
hardly credible.


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