From: Zilbandy on
On Wed, 2 May 2007 21:46:45 -0500, barbie gee
<barbie.gee(a)NOSESPAMgmail.com> wrote:

>You might be paying for lights in the common hallway, lobby, or exterior
>or basement lighting, depending on the wiring.

My wife rented office space in a small office complex many years ago,
and her electric bill seemed unusually large for her office size.
Turns out the complex outdoor lighting and a billboard sign were wired
to her office's electric meter. She complained to the landlord and
they worked out an agreement that they both could live with.

--
Zilbandy
From: s on
On May 4, 10:23 am, Zilbandy <z...(a)zilbandyREMOVETHIS.com> wrote:
> On Wed, 2 May 2007 21:46:45 -0500, barbie gee
>
> <barbie....(a)NOSESPAMgmail.com> wrote:
> >You might be paying for lights in the common hallway, lobby, or exterior
> >or basement lighting, depending on the wiring.
>
> My wife rented office space in a small office complex many years ago,
> and her electric bill seemed unusually large for her office size.
> Turns out the complex outdoor lighting and a billboard sign were wired
> to her office's electric meter. She complained to the landlord and
> they worked out an agreement that they both could live with.
>
> --
> Zilbandy


Thanks for the reply. I clarified it with my landlord and he told he
was paying for
the lights outside the apartment but considering my bills I am
skeptical.


From: w_tom on
On May 4, 9:37 am, s <s...(a)mailinator.com> wrote:
> One question I had was will using a surgeprotectorimpact the bills?
> And does leaving the surgeprotectorin the socket
> turned off consume power? I don't have it which is careless of me but
> was planning to get it but now am hesitant due
> to my high bills. I understand for equipments like laptop that is
> highly required.

Surge protector is a switch. It is not something magical. It is a
switch that remains open - conducts no electricity - except when a
massive surge current arrives. When the switch closes, then that
current is diverted. If the switch is connected single digit feet to
earth ground, then current is diverted to the protection. Protector
is not protection. Earth ground is the protection.

How to be frugal. One 'whole house' protector for everything in the
house. Dishwasher, microwave oven, and clock radio require
protection. And far more critical than a laptop is protecting smoke
detector, kitchen and bathroom GFCI, and furnace controls. IOW one
'whole house' protector for about $1 per protected appliance. Or the
plug-in protector that does not have the earthing connection, does not
claim to protect a laptop from the other and typically destructive
surge, and cost maybe $25 or $100 per appliance.

Surge protectors don't consume electricity. That 'switch' closes
only for microseconds maybe once every many years. But cost of and
if it does anything is more important. A protector too close to a
laptop may even earth a surge, destructively, through that laptop.
That's just not frugal.


From: w_tom on
On May 4, 9:48 am, s <s...(a)mailinator.com> wrote:
> Agreed, but they(mystery charges, fees and taxes) should be equal for
> all. If I am charged lot more
> than some household who use far less than me then either someone is
> tapping into my water/electric usage
> or there is a large leakage.

After doing the 'theoretically it should do this', well, junior high
school science. Do that theory. Then collect experimental evidence.
Learn to read the meters. Only when consumption is known
theoretically AND then confirmed with 'experimental' numbers from
meters; only then do you have a fact.

Run certain appliances, know what they are suppose to consume, and
then see same numbers on the gas, electric, or water meter.

From: George Grapman on
s wrote:
> On May 4, 10:23 am, Zilbandy <z...(a)zilbandyREMOVETHIS.com> wrote:
>> On Wed, 2 May 2007 21:46:45 -0500, barbie gee
>>
>> <barbie....(a)NOSESPAMgmail.com> wrote:
>>> You might be paying for lights in the common hallway, lobby, or exterior
>>> or basement lighting, depending on the wiring.
>> My wife rented office space in a small office complex many years ago,
>> and her electric bill seemed unusually large for her office size.
>> Turns out the complex outdoor lighting and a billboard sign were wired
>> to her office's electric meter. She complained to the landlord and
>> they worked out an agreement that they both could live with.
>>
>> --
>> Zilbandy
>
>
> Thanks for the reply. I clarified it with my landlord and he told he
> was paying for
> the lights outside the apartment but considering my bills I am
> skeptical.
>
>
You might try this. When the outside lights are on go to your meter
and turn it off. If the outside lights go off you know he is wrong.

--
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