From: JRWeiss on
sr wrote:

> So, when the Big Bang didn't happen, what did you think?

The people hired to sto it from happening did their jobs!
From: Michael Black on
On Sat, 17 Oct 2009, sr wrote:

> There seems to be so many survival suggestions, and techniques, how to do
> much with little to do with,
> made for an interesting group.
> Wish I had the money I spent on mobil solar panels, crank up radios, etc.
> That I really never
> figured out. Than again, if cap and trade goes through, ---- guess I'll
> hang on to the stuff
> a little longer, now that I think about it.
>
Frugality isn't about chasing trends, that's your problem. The only way
trends help frugality is if it makes something you want cheaper, or the
secondary event, they become available at garage sales (also cheap).

Frugality is about making informed choices, balancing things. So if
people got hoodwinked by a fear of some disaster happening and rushed
out and bought, they sure weren't frugal. Other people who looked into
the matter, maybe picking and choosing, came out ahead.

There is lot of frugality in stocking up. Not in outrageous amounts of
things you'll never eat, but in buying ahead when things are on sale. If
I know I'm going to eat canned corn, it is far better to buy when it's on
sale, and buy a number of cans to take me through to the next sale. If I
have the money, I save money by buying on sale, and I do have it in
case of emergency. An emergency is likely going to be a much simpler
thing, like being sick for a week and unable to get out shopping, so if
you have nothing in stock, you'll starve.

Someone who rushes out to buy a crank radio because everyone else is doing
it in fear of a Big Disaster is likely to be disatisfied with their
purchase, since they did it for a specific event and didn't use it. The
frugal person would look at things over a period of time, see the prices
drop or at least notice when they might be on sale, and decide it's worth
having just in case, when the price is right. They might feel a need for
a radio for every day use, and realize a crank radio would lessen the cost
of buying batteries (and they'd think about whether spending the money on
the crank radio is going to offset the cost of the batteries they might
use up). Or they might wait, until they can find a crank radio at a
garage sale (everyone else having bought them for some percieved Event
and then not wanting the "clutter" afterwards). Or they'd find it lying
in a pile of garbage waiting for the garbage trucks. Or they'd get one
when they bought something else that they wanted, and the store tossed
in a free crank radio.

I did find my crank radio in the garbage last summer, and when I bought
a shortwave radio a few weeks ago, at half price, the deal was sweatened
by a crank radio that otherwise cost an outrageous $60, which I gave
away. I still can't decide whether I got a $200 shortwave radio for
$40, or got it for a hundred with a free crank radio, or somewhere in
between.

The frugal person wouldn't be swayed by the "Emergency Event" but might
use it to consider how well prepared they are for emergencies in general.
And since they want to deal with the long term rather than some mass
event, they can just as easily wait till the Big Event is over, then buy
at a marked down price, getting prepared without the cost.

Michael

From: sr on
" that's your problem. "
you must be a joy to live with
"Michael Black" <et472(a)ncf.ca> wrote in message
news:Pine.LNX.4.64.0910180925521.9225(a)darkstar.example.net...
> On Sat, 17 Oct 2009, sr wrote:
>
>> There seems to be so many survival suggestions, and techniques, how to do
>> much with little to do with,
>> made for an interesting group.
>> Wish I had the money I spent on mobil solar panels, crank up radios, etc.
>> That I really never
>> figured out. Than again, if cap and trade goes through, ---- guess I'll
>> hang on to the stuff
>> a little longer, now that I think about it.
>>
> Frugality isn't about chasing trends, that's your problem. The only way
> trends help frugality is if it makes something you want cheaper, or the
> secondary event, they become available at garage sales (also cheap).
>
> Frugality is about making informed choices, balancing things. So if
> people got hoodwinked by a fear of some disaster happening and rushed
> out and bought, they sure weren't frugal. Other people who looked into
> the matter, maybe picking and choosing, came out ahead.
>
> There is lot of frugality in stocking up. Not in outrageous amounts of
> things you'll never eat, but in buying ahead when things are on sale. If
> I know I'm going to eat canned corn, it is far better to buy when it's on
> sale, and buy a number of cans to take me through to the next sale. If I
> have the money, I save money by buying on sale, and I do have it in
> case of emergency. An emergency is likely going to be a much simpler
> thing, like being sick for a week and unable to get out shopping, so if
> you have nothing in stock, you'll starve.
>
> Someone who rushes out to buy a crank radio because everyone else is doing
> it in fear of a Big Disaster is likely to be disatisfied with their
> purchase, since they did it for a specific event and didn't use it. The
> frugal person would look at things over a period of time, see the prices
> drop or at least notice when they might be on sale, and decide it's worth
> having just in case, when the price is right. They might feel a need for
> a radio for every day use, and realize a crank radio would lessen the cost
> of buying batteries (and they'd think about whether spending the money on
> the crank radio is going to offset the cost of the batteries they might
> use up). Or they might wait, until they can find a crank radio at a
> garage sale (everyone else having bought them for some percieved Event
> and then not wanting the "clutter" afterwards). Or they'd find it lying
> in a pile of garbage waiting for the garbage trucks. Or they'd get one
> when they bought something else that they wanted, and the store tossed
> in a free crank radio.
>
> I did find my crank radio in the garbage last summer, and when I bought
> a shortwave radio a few weeks ago, at half price, the deal was sweatened
> by a crank radio that otherwise cost an outrageous $60, which I gave
> away. I still can't decide whether I got a $200 shortwave radio for
> $40, or got it for a hundred with a free crank radio, or somewhere in
> between.
>
> The frugal person wouldn't be swayed by the "Emergency Event" but might
> use it to consider how well prepared they are for emergencies in general.
> And since they want to deal with the long term rather than some mass
> event, they can just as easily wait till the Big Event is over, then buy
> at a marked down price, getting prepared without the cost.
>
> Michael
>


From: Gary Heston on
In article <4806b$4ada8b4c$ccb5841b$24637(a)ispn.net>,
sr <solos42(a)uninets.net> wrote:
>Good suggestion.
> Not knowing much about computers.Back than,
>and not anymore today,
> I did put all that
>information on frugal living and survival tips ,on the computer ,I lost
>all of it, along with my income tax returns, stocks, all gone

There is this concept called "backups" which I highly recommend. In fact,
I found it appalling that Microsoft consumer operating systems didn't
incorporate a backup program prior to Windows XP (other than "copy").

Now, with low-cost flash and external USB drives or DVD writers, there's
no reason to not be making backups. Remember to store them offsite, too.

If you had a hard drive crash, data can frequently be recovered--but the
cost is pretty high.

>So, when the Big Bang didn't happen, what did you think?
[ ... ]

That all the doomsday soothsayers were wrong, as usual, particularly
since most of them knew next to nothing about IT. I've been working in
IT since the mid '80s and didn't stockpile anything or buy a generator.

The network I was supporting had no problems, and I don't personally
know anyone who did have any.

Now, someone is claiming that an ancient Aztec calendar says the world will
end in 2012; more nonsense to get attention and money.


Gary

--
Gary Heston gheston(a)hiwaay.net http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
"Where large, expensive pieces of exotic woods are converted to valueless,
hard to dispose of sawdust, chips and scraps." Charlie B.s' definition of
woodworking.
From: sr on
You wouldn't happen to be listening to that overnight show, would you?
That one, I am not getting sucked into. The Maine winters are more
threating to me than 2012.
Now, I had a friend that worked in the high tech business, he validated
the worry. I haven't heard from him since, as I lost my computer.
I would love to hear his explanation, however. He was one of the
BRAINS in school. So I took it serously. I have since wised up.
I think

"Gary Heston" <gheston(a)hiwaay.net> wrote in message
news:UJ-dnRGP5t402kbXnZ2dnUVZ_uednZ2d(a)posted.hiwaay2...
> In article <4806b$4ada8b4c$ccb5841b$24637(a)ispn.net>,
> sr <solos42(a)uninets.net> wrote:
>>Good suggestion.
>> Not knowing much about computers.Back than,
>>and not anymore today,
>> I did put all that
>>information on frugal living and survival tips ,on the computer ,I lost
>>all of it, along with my income tax returns, stocks, all gone
>
> There is this concept called "backups" which I highly recommend. In fact,
> I found it appalling that Microsoft consumer operating systems didn't
> incorporate a backup program prior to Windows XP (other than "copy").
>
> Now, with low-cost flash and external USB drives or DVD writers, there's
> no reason to not be making backups. Remember to store them offsite, too.
>
> If you had a hard drive crash, data can frequently be recovered--but the
> cost is pretty high.
>
>>So, when the Big Bang didn't happen, what did you think?
> [ ... ]
>
> That all the doomsday soothsayers were wrong, as usual, particularly
> since most of them knew next to nothing about IT. I've been working in
> IT since the mid '80s and didn't stockpile anything or buy a generator.
>
> The network I was supporting had no problems, and I don't personally
> know anyone who did have any.
>
> Now, someone is claiming that an ancient Aztec calendar says the world
> will
> end in 2012; more nonsense to get attention and money.
>
>
> Gary
>
> --
> Gary Heston gheston(a)hiwaay.net http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
> "Where large, expensive pieces of exotic woods are converted to valueless,
> hard to dispose of sawdust, chips and scraps." Charlie B.s' definition of
> woodworking.